4 Techniques to Ace GMAT Sentence Correction Questions
Posted on
17
Jun 2021

4 Techniques to Ace GMAT Sentence Correction Questions

By: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Andrej Ivanovski
Date: 17th June 2021

 

The GMAT Sentence Correction questions are one of the three question formats that comprise the Verbal section, with the other two being Reading Comprehension and Critical Reasoning. Test takers should expect to come across anything between 11 and 16 sentence correction questions on the exam. Each GMAT Sentence Correction question contains a part that is underlined, and you will be prompted to identify the mistake in the sentence and replace it with one of the five options provided.

Even though this might sound like a piece of cake at first glance, there is a catch. The reason that most GMAT test takers find the Sentence Correction questions challenging is the fact that the sentences provided are usually several lines long and the grammatical mistakes are not very apparent. If you follow these 4 GMAT Sentence Correction techniques you will find it a lot easier to spot the mistakes and ace the GMAT Sentence Correction questions.

Get rid of the extra information

The GMAC intentionally makes the GMAT Sentence Correction problems long by including a lot of fluff and descriptive information which very often covers up the error and makes it very difficult to spot. Therefore, getting rid of that extra information would not only make the sentence shorter and simpler, but it would also make it easier for you to uncover the mistake. But, how do you know which part of the sentence to get rid of?

 

  • Look for parts of the sentence set off by commas. Oftentimes, the part that is set off the comma only serves to better explain or give more details about the subject, and when removed it would not affect the meaning of the sentence. Here’s what extra information looks like in a sentence (note that there are no mistakes in the given example):

Maria, Stephen’s youngest and most talented daughter, moved to Sweden. 

Maria, Stephen’s youngest and most talented daughter, moved to Sweden. 

In the sentence above, the part set off by commas is not necessary to convey the meaning of the sentence. So, even if you get rid of that part, you would still be left with a complete sentence. However, one caveat to keep in mind is that the extra information does not necessarily have to be separated by two commas, as it can come at the beginning or the end of the sentence (a modifier), in which case it would only be set off with a single comma.

  • Look for adjectives and adverbial phrases. These could be a little more challenging to find, as they are not set off by commas and one needs to understand the meaning of the sentence in order to identify them.

A group of young men coming from Dubai held a conference in New York.

The sentence above can exist without the two underlined parts: of young men and coming from Dubai. Even though they make the sentence more descriptive, they do not convey the main meaning of the sentence, and can therefore be taken out of the sentence for the sake of simplicity and spotting the mistake more easily.

Pay attention to the meaning

We have already established that grammar is vital if you want to do well on the GMAT Sentence Correction problems. Is grammar necessary? Absolutely! Is grammar everything that you need? Definitely not! No matter how good you are at grammar, solely relying on it is guaranteed to get you stuck at one point or another.

It is often the case that GMAT Sentence Correction problems are free of grammatical errors, but contain logical ones. GMAT test-makers are actually hoping that test-takers will only rely upon grammar and would not pay attention to less formal errors, so if you want to do well on this type of question you absolutely need to pay attention to the meaning of the sentence.

In order to do so, you first need to read the sentence carefully and try to understand the meaning behind it. Oftentimes, it might seem that the sentence is perfectly correct and free of grammar mistakes, and you would not be able to find a logical gap or an inconsistency. In that case, you will want to look through the answers provided and try to assess the message that they are trying to convey. When doing that, you might get an idea of what could be wrong with the original sentence and that way find the correct one.

Use “splits”

Another strategy which includes using the answer choices in order to successfully answer the GMAT Sentence Correction problems is the so-called “splits” strategy. This strategy involves trying to find similarities and dissimilarities, or any kind of patterns in the answer choices. In order to explain this strategy, we will use a GMAT Sentence Correction problem from the GMAT Official Guide.

 

The overall slackening of growth in productivity is influenced less by government regulation, although that is significant for specific industries like mining, than the coming to an end of a period of rapid growth in agricultural productivity.

  • the coming to an end of
  • the ending of
  • by the coming to an end of
  • by ending
  • by the end of

 

In a question like this, the mistake might not be apparent at first. Therefore, in order to get an idea of what the mistake could be, we will have a look at the answer choices. In there, we can see two patterns: C, D and E all contain “by”, whereas A and B do not. If we look at the sentence, we can see that the first part of it says “is influenced less by”, which implies that the second part of the questions has to begin with “…than by”. Therefore, the split AB, and we continue looking for the answer in the CDE split. If we try to plug each of these three answers into the sentence, we can see that E is the only one that is grammatically correct and therefore we get E as an answer.

The “splits” technique is especially useful in helping you narrow down the choices and find the right answer more easily.

Learn the most common GMAT idioms

In order to do well on the Sentence Correction GMAT questions, you need to have a good command of idioms. If you have already started preparing you might have come across a GMAT idiom list in the prep materials. So, you might be wondering why it is important to learn them and how they will be tested on the GMAT.

First, let us begin by explaining what an idiom is. Chances are, if you are not a “grammar freak” you might not be sure what the exact meaning of an idiom is. An idiom is a common expression or a grammatical structure in a given language, in this case – English. Oftentimes, the term idiom is used to describe a saying such as “let the cat out of the bag” or “a piece of cake”. Even though these are important to know if you want to sound more fluent and natural in English, they are not tested on the GMAT. In the context of the GMAT, an idiom is a formation of two or more words that are often used together, such as “invest in” or “indicate that”.

So, now that we have gotten the definition out of the way, you might be wondering why it is important to learn some of the most common GMAT idioms, and how they will be tested. In the GMAT Sentence Correction problems, oftentimes you will come across an incorrectly used idiom. The mistake can take several different forms. 

  • Preposition

Take, for instance, the expression invest on. Here, the preposition used is on when in fact it should be in. Even though it could be apparent in this case, on the GMAT the mistake can often be subtle and a little more difficult to spot. 

  • Word choice 

This is also a common mistake, especially when it comes to words that are close in meaning. Examples of such words are among/between, fewer/less, whether/if, like/as, and so on.

  • Correlatives

Correlatives are words that are used together to serve a single function in a sentence. Some examples include both/and, either/or and neither/nor. A mistake in correlative pairs is also common, especially when it comes to longer and more complex sentences, as these mistakes could be more difficult to spot in those cases.

Conclusion

Here’s a summary of all of the techniques that we discussed here:

  1. Get rid of extra information
  2. Pay attention to the meaning
  3. Use “splits”
  4. Get familiar with the most common GMAT idioms

These techniques are not mutually exclusive and they can be used in combination with one another. Applying them and putting them into practice can save you a whole lot of work and help you do better on the GMAT Sentence Correction problems. And if you feel like you could use some more guidance, please make sure to check out our highly personalized one-on-one GMAT tutoring. Our tutoring sessions are delivered by 770+ scoring tutors and are available both online and in-person, no matter where in the world you are.

 

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How Important is the Integrated Reasoning Section of the GMAT?
Posted on
15
Jun 2021

How Important is the Integrated Reasoning Section of the GMAT?

By: Dana Coggio
Published: 15th June 2021

What is the Integrated Reasoning Section? 

The Integrative Reasoning section on the GMAT attempts to measure your ability to solve complex problems through data interpretation. Doing well on this portion of the test is necessary for your overall GMAT score. Plus, according to MBA.com, MBA programs look at this score in order to assess your ability to do the following: 

  • Synthesize information presented in graphics, text, and numbers.
  • Evaluate relevant information from different sources.
  • Organize information to see relationships and to solve multiple, interrelated problems.
  • Combine and manipulate information from multiple sources to solve complex problems.

These are all valuable skills which can set you apart from other candidates. Proving you can excel in these qualities reflects your ability to succeed not only in your MBA program but also in your business career as well. 

How is the IR portion split up? 

The Integrated Reasoning portion of the exam contains four question variants totaling 12 questions overall. Usually, these questions have multiple steps meaning the 30 minutes allotted for you to complete the portion will most likely be utilized fully. The questions provided utilize both quantitative and verbal reasoning in various combinations. It is imperative that you answer all sub-questions of a single question correctly. Points are awarded only to questions completed with 100% correctness. 

The four types of questions in this portion are: 

  • Multi-Source Reasoning 
  • Table Analysis
  • Graphics Interpretation 
  • Two-Part Analysis
Multi-source Reasoning:


Utilizes text, table, and/or graphics to measure your ability to recognize discrepancies, draw inferences, and determine relevant data from the given information. This portion provides solutions as either ‘multiple choice’ questions or ‘multiple dichotomous’ questions. Multiple Choice questions has you select the best option from five possibilities. Multiple Dichotomous questions offer three phrases, statements, numerical values or algebraic expressions that need you to select the proper condition. 

Table Analysis:

Presents you with a table of data with which you prove your ability to analyze and sort present information. A simple text is provided with the presented data or table. You are then required to pick one of the conditions provided in that is the best suited response. Examples of how the possible solutions are formulated are as follows: 

  • Each statement is true (yes or no), according to the information in the table
  • Each statement or numerical value is consistent or inconsistent with the information in the table
  • Each statement or numerical value can or cannot be determined on the basis of the information in the table 
Graphics Interpretation:

Utilizes graphs or similar imagery to measure how well you can read and interpret the information displayed. Graphs on the portion present themselves as bar graphs, line graphs, scatter plots, bubble graphs, pie charts or flow charts. It is necessary that you brush up on these various graphs and how to read them in order to ace the Integrated Reasoning portion. 

Two-Part Analysis:

Is the complex problem portion where you are given either a quantitative and/or verbal question to solve. These questions usually are broad in topic and are written as a brief scenario. Be sure to read these questions carefully so to understand what the question is asking. An example of answers are formulated are as follows: 

  • Calculate the proportions of two different components in a mixture
  • Determine something that would be lost and something that would be gained in a trade-off
  • Find the maximum number of two different products that could be purchased within a certain budget
  • Identify a first action and a second action that together would bring a company into compliance with a new rule 

What is a good IR score? 

Scores on the Integrative Reasoning portion of the exam range from 1-8. Seven percent of test-takers (or the 93rd percentile) score a perfect score (8) on the exam. Following that, a score of 7 ranks you in the 82nd percentile, a score of 6 in the 70th, a score of 5 in the 55th, a score of 4 in the 40th, a score of 3 in the 26th, and a score of 2 in the 12th percentile. 

While it is quite impossible to say the exact score top-tier business schools look for when assessing an applicant, achieving a high score is looked favorably upon by recruiters. Because your Integrated Reasoning score directly reflects your abilities as a student and an employee in the business world, it is vital to take time to study this portion fully. Having a high overall GMAT score but with a low Integrative Reasoning score will help you application stand out, however, not in the way you would like. Some studies show that your Integrated Reasoning score does positively correlate with your future GPA as a student. This is something that top-tier business schools do take into consideration when sifting their piles of potential applicants. 

Tips for excelling at the IR portion

It is important not to lose sleep over your Integrated Reasoning score as it is not the be all and end all, however, learning how to crack the code of this section can mean the difference between having your positively stand out to admissions teams, or to be sidelined when compared to other applicants. If you are looking for tips on how to study for the integrative reasoning portion then Apex GMAT has written an entire article dedicated to helping you with your studies! You can read more about the Integrative Reasoning portion and study techniques here: 

As with all sections of the GMAT, understanding the nuances of the exam can help you succeed. Working with a private tutor can help you achieve your goals and streamline your understanding of the various GMAT sections. You can find more information on working with a private tutor HERE

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How Difficult is the Executive Assessment
Posted on
10
Jun 2021

How Difficult is the Executive Assessment?

By: Dana Coggio
Published:  10th June 2021

How Difficult is the Executive Assessment?

As subjective as that question is, you are not the first person to be asking it. When comparing the Executive Assessment to the GMAT a general conclusion has been reached that this test is easier. As it is geared towards individuals who have already been working in the field of business and management for quite some time, there is an expectation for people taking the exam that they may not have an exorbitant amount of time put towards studying and preparing. At 1.5 hours, the Executive Assessment takes only half as long as the GMAT. Quant questions on the exam are geared towards individuals who have been out of school for quite some time, and thus may not remember basic high school or college math techniques so some of the quantitative sections that you would find on the GMAT are not on the Executive Assessment, such as Geometry.

Even the format of the exams is not as strict as that of the GMAT. During the exam, you will have the ability to jump around from question to question within a section. Unlike the GMAT, where each question is successive without the possibility to review, the EA gives you the possibility to return to questions to redo or review them. Keep in mind, however, that you will not receive any additional time to review your questions.

Taking all this into account, it is quite impossible to give a quantifiable answer on whether or not the EA is difficult. Given its structure and the amount and type of questions, it can be assumed that the Executive Assessment test is easier, if not of the same caliber, as the GMAT test.

Structure of the EA

Simply put, the Executive Assessment test is designed and structured to best cater towards individuals who may be too busy with work, family, or other important priorities to commit to the GMAT. Meant for EMBA programs, the Executive Assessment is similar to the GMAT in that it tests and measures your complex judgement, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills.

The Executive Assessment is a 90-minute exam split up into three sections and scored between 100 and 200 points. The three sections are the Verbal Section, the Quantitative Section, and the Integrated Reasoning Section. (Feel free to click on the links to read more on these sections – as they may appear on the GMAT – and how to study for them). All three sections are 30-minutes in length, with the Verbal and Quantitative sections having a total of 14 questions and the Integrated Reasoning having 12. Similar verbal and quantitative questions can be found on both the Executive Assessment and the GMAT. The Integrated Reasoning Portion, on the other hand, is weighted exactly the same as the other two sections. This is different than on the GMAT where the Integrated Reasoning is weighted less than the other sections.  

Another striking difference between the GMAT and the EA is how it is administered online. Unlike with the GMAT, those who take the EA are given the opportunity to review their answers and change any responses they would like. Another difference is that the EA’s Quantitative and Verbal sections are section adaptive (compare that to the GMAT which is question adaptive. You can read more about the structure of the GMAT HERE.) The sectionality of the EA means that there are two subsections within each portion of the test that consists of 7 questions each. This is an advantage for the test taker as, at the end of each section, you have the possibility to review your answers and change any responses within the subsection. 

Percentiles of the GMAT vs EA

There is little data available on Executive Assessment scores and their impact on school admissions. This is because the Executive Assessment first came out in 2016. The Executive Assessment has published that a score of 150 ranks an individual as being in the 50th percentile, though more percentiles have not been released. That being said, preliminary data show that a score of 168 and above places an individual within the 99th percentile.

As with the majority of admissions processes your score is just one of many factors that is taken into account when you apply for an EMBA program. However, for admission to a top-tier EMBA program, scoring above a 150 is very important. Even better would be to score above a 163 which would set you apart from other applicants. If you are interested in EA prep materials or finding a private tutor to help you in your journey to reach your goal click HERE.  

How the EA is scored

The Executive Assessment score ranges from 100-200. However, according to GMAC, it is not possible to score lower than a 120 or higher than a 174. Thus, scoring above a 160 makes an applicant more competitive. Because the Executive Assessment is designed for individuals who have quite a few years of practical experience under their belt, the questions on the exam are meant to draw upon the knowledge you may have gained during your work experience. That being said, you should still take the time to study for the exam so that you can answer the questions being asked within a narrow timeframe. Just like with the GMAT, study materials for the EA are available as well as tutors who can help you achieve your desired score. More information on various prep materials can be found HERE. If you are interested in learning more about a potential EA tutor, you can set up a complimentary call with an APEX instructor HERE

 

Where the EA is accepted

Many top-tier business schools accept your EA exam results. The following schools are some (but not all) which do accept the EA exam in place of the GMAT for their EMBA Programs:

  1. Chicago Booth   
  2. INSEAD   
  3. Duke Fuqua  Yale School of Management
  4. Emory – Goizueta Business School   
  5. NYU – STERN         
  6. Berkeley Haas          
  7. ESMT Berlin  UNC – Kenan Flagler Business School        
  8. London Business School
  9. University of Oxford Vlerick Business School      
  10. University of Pennsylvania – Wharton 
  11. MIT Management. Sloan School        
  12. IE Business School     
  13. University of Virginia                

 

 

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When to Hire a Private GMAT Tutor?
Posted on
08
Jun 2021

When to Hire a Private GMAT Tutor?

By: Dana Coggio
Published: 8th June 2021

Once you have made the decision to get your MBA, the next challenge awaits you: Studying for and taking the GMAT. You’ve purchased the books, set up a study schedule, prepared yourself mentally for the task that lays before you. (This infographic provides you with handy tips for your GMAT study prep). And yet, as you begin studying, you find yourself stuck and unsure of what to do next. First things first, it is important for you to understand that this is perfectly normal. The GMAT is an exam that tests more than just your quantitative and analytical skills, it is meant to score your ability to think critically and outside of the box. If you find yourself rereading sections of your GMAT prep books or googling various study tricks and tips, it might be time to consider getting yourself a private GMAT tutor.

That in and of itself seems a daunting task. Where do you even begin with finding someone capable of helping you achieve your goals? Well, before you look for a private GMAT tutor, it is necessary that you first understand when to get yourself a private tutor. This important step means you, and your tutor, are ready to work together to achieve a well thought out goal.

Establish your Goals

Before you begin looking for a private GMAT tutor, you need to know what your GMAT and MBA goals are. Perhaps you are striving for a 700+ and looking to apply to a top-tier MBA program. Or maybe you are looking to up your score by 50 points to be considered more competitive for your dream MBA. Whatever the reason, you need to have a good grasp on why you are taking the GMAT and what your goals are.

Having a clear mindset means you can search for a private GMAT tutor whose skills match your goals. This also means you are not wasting precious time with your GMAT tutor recapping where you see yourself in 20 years. As GMAT tutors can be pricey, it is important to optimize your time with your tutor. Additionally, it is important to research how private tutors can help you achieve your goal. If you are interested in increasing your score above a 700, for example, our article on how private GMAT tutors help you in this task can be read here: How Can Private Tutoring Help You Score 700+ on the GMAT?

Establish your baseline

One of the most important things you can do when starting to study for the GMAT is to take a practice exam. You can find a free practice GMAT exam HERE. Once you have taken the practice GMAT exam, you will have a better understanding of where your strengths and weaknesses lie. However, knowing how to strengthen your weakness or grow your strengths may seem intimidating. This is why, when looking for a private GMAT tutor, you should go into your first meeting with a clear understanding of where you score on the GMAT and what some of your initial GMAT prep challenges are.

This gives your private tutor a better understanding of what aspects of the GMAT you struggle the most with and which parts require only brief reviews. Even better would be to take the mock GMAT exam with your tutor present so that they provide you with more knowledgeable feedback and study plans. In Apex’s case for instance, in a 2.5 hour assessment session an instructor puts you through your paces to see where you need the most help and where they should focus your efforts to get the most leverage in your allotted prep time.  

Begin Studying

So, you have created achievable goals and established your baseline GMAT score. You are confident about beginning your studying, and yet, as the weeks pass and the GMAT exam comes closer you realize you aren’t anywhere near where you want to be. This is an important realization for you as a student. If you recognize that no matter how many hours you commit to studying or how many practice exams you take your understanding of the material is not increasing then, perhaps, it is time to turn to a professional to support you in your journey.

A private GMAT tutor will not only help you in comprehension of the materials, but they also will give you confidence and the support to achieve your goals while holding you accountable to your studies. This scoring plateau phenomenon is what most GMAT prep students face at one point or another during the GMAT journey. 

Investing in a GMAT tutor

When it is time to look for a private GMAT tutor it is important to know that this decision is an investment. Although they may not always say so outright, numerous MBA students at many top-tier universities invested in a private GMAT tutor to help them study for the exam. Investing in a private GMAT tutor is an investment in your future and can pay off in the long run even after you have been admitted to your dream MBA program. Working with a high achieving tutor can be pricey.

The costs associated with a reputable GMAT tutor should reflect the investment they put into helping you achieve your goals. Your time is valuable, and so looking for a private GMAT tutor shouldn’t be the main objective of your studies but investing a couple hours to find the right fit can pay off in the end as a stellar GMAT score will not only help in your MBA application process, but it could land you quality scholarships and a place at some of the top consulting firms after b-school.  

Where to look for a GMAT tutor

Finding a proper GMAT tutor means finding a tutor who works with you to achieve your goals. There are a lot of GMAT tutors on the market who claim to ‘know the secret’ or can ‘guarantee a score’. Be wary of these tutors, as there is no true way to guarantee success. Success on the GMAT comes down to you as an individual and the time you invest in studying. A private GMAT tutor is there to help guide you and support you on your GMAT study journey. It is important to find a reputable GMAT tutor whose skills and ways of teaching match how you learn and your goals.

On an average search engine, a deluge of offers and potential tutors appear, and this plethora can seem quite overwhelming.  Luckily, Apex GMAT offers a complimentary 30-minute session with one of our instructors. This session gives you the opportunity to gauge whether or not a private GMAT tutor is right for you. To learn more about where to find a fitting GMAT tutor, check out our article on How to Select a GMAT Tutor.

Finally…

…whether you are 6 months into studying or you are just starting the process, it is never too late to invest in a GMAT tutor. The sooner you do, however, the more your tutor can support you and the more you can get out of the experience. We have worked with clients who are 8 months into their GMAT journey and beaten down to newcomers who are looking at the test through fresh eyes, so we have heard it all before.

Knowing when to get a GMAT tutor is vital to your success. We highly suggest signing up for a complimentary consultation with one of our tutors, as they can help you more narrowly define when to find a GMAT tutor and if a GMAT tutor is right for you. You can sign up for a complimentary 30-minute slot HERE. Still unsure, feel free to listen HERE for some testimonials from people, just like you, who invested in a private GMAT tutor and are very glad they did! 

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executive assessment test
Posted on
03
Jun 2021

All You Need To Know About The Executive Assessment Online

by: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Uerda Muça
Date: 3rd June 2021

As a consequence of the Covid-19 pandemic almost every exam has to now be taken online, including the Executive Assessment. Since this was an unprecedented situation, it has taken some time to adjust to these changes. When introducing something new, it is understandable that many questions might arise. So, in this article, you will find all there is to know about the Executive Assessment Online Exam. 

What is the EA Online?

The Executive Assessment Online is an online and remote proctored version of the Executive Assessment. This interim solution was developed to assist both test-takers and schools during the closure of the test centers as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic. The new online format intends to assist those applicants who are working on meeting their upcoming application deadlines. 

What important information should you know about EA Online?

How long is the EA Online?

The timing for the Executive Assessment Online hasn’t changed; it is still 90 minutes, 30 minutes per section. Apart from the 90 minutes, we suggest setting aside 15 minutes before the exam starts for the check-in process. During this process, you will be asked to show a valid government-issued ID that has a recognizable and recent photo (e.g. passport or driver’s license). Also, your identity will be verified via facial recognition technology, meaning that you will have to show your face on the camera of the device you’re using. 

What is the structure of the Online EA?

The format of the Executive Assessment Online has remained the same as the structure of the Executive Assessment exam delivered in test centers. The exam includes 3 main sections: Quantitative Reasoning (14 questions), Verbal (14 questions), and Integrated Reasoning (12 questions). Besides the number of questions per section not changing, the types of questions you should expect in each section haven’t changed either. 

How is the Executive Assessment Online scored?

The scoring algorithm and the scoring scale used in the test center-based version are used for the Section Score and Total Score in the online version of the Executive Assessment. The total scale of the exam ranges from 100 to 200 while the scale for each section varies from 0 to 20. Even though the IR section has fewer questions than the other two sections, they are weighted all the same when determining your total score. 

When is the Executive Assessment Online available?

Since it is an online version of the Executive Assessment, appointments are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. An appointment can be scheduled up to 24 hours before an available testing window. 

Who can take the Executive Assessment Online?

If you’re wondering if there are any requirements you have to fulfill in order to take the Executive Assessment Online, the answer is no; it’s open to all test takers. However, due to regulatory and local data privacy rules, the Executive Assessment Online is NOT available in these locations:

  • Cuba 
  • Iran
  • Mainland China
  • North Korea
  • Sudan

Who will protect the exam’s integrity?

As mentioned, the Executive Assessment Online is a remote proctored exam. Just like in the Executive Assessment taken in a test center, human proctors are going to monitor you (your session and your workspace). The only difference is that the whole process is supported by AI technology. Something else to keep in mind is that your assessment (audio feeds and live video) is going to be recorded. 

Quick tip. Don’t forget to ask proctors for help if you encounter any issues. Just click on the chat link within the OnVUE application or wave your hand to speak to the proctor.

How often can I take the Executive Assessment Online?

You can take the Executive Assessment Online up to two times. However, a really important clarification to make here is that these two attempts provided by the online version of the exam are independent of any attempts completed in a Test Center. Also, if you happen to go through some technical issues and are required to take the test again, it doesn’t count as an extra attempt. 

As per your second online attempt, it can be scheduled before or after your first online test. Keep in mind that there should be at least 16 days between the two appointments, meaning the second appointment has to be scheduled at least 16 days after your first attempt. 

How much does the Executive Assessment online cost?

The registration fee for the Executive Assessment Online is $350 (USD) and you don’t have to worry about costs associated with rescheduling since free unlimited reschedules are included in this price and also you will get your scores without any extra cost. However, if you decide to cancel your appointment, a $100 (USD) cancellation fee applies.

Important!  No appointment changes can be made within 24 hours of a scheduled appointment time.

Since it was first introduced in March 2016, the format of the Executive Assessment has not changed, and adapting to the new online version might take some time. However, now that you know what to expect in terms of the format, scoring, and availability of the exam, the process of adaptation is going to get smoother. 

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GMAT Prep & Test Approaches to Score in the 650 - 700 range
Posted on
01
Jun 2021

GMAT Prep & Test Approaches to Score in the 650 to 700 Range

By: Andrej Ivanovski
Date: 1st June 2021

Getting a good GMAT score is no walk in the park. A lot of test takers struggle with hitting the minimum score to get into their desired graduate program, and they find themselves taking the GMAT multiple times before achieving their score goal. But, what is a good GMAT score? The answer is, as you might have guessed, it depends. Different business schools have different expectations. What might be considered an excellent score at one school, could be viewed as acceptable but not stellar at another.

Therefore, it is safe to say that a good GMAT score is one that gets you into the graduate program of your choice. However, one thing to keep in mind is that sometimes achieving the minimum scoring requirement may not be enough. Generally speaking, it is better to aim for the average class GMAT score, or higher. A score in the 650 to 700 range is very likely to secure you a spot at some great business schools (given that you satisfy the other admission requirements), but at the end of the day, it all depends on the specific program that you are applying to. In this article, we are going to look at some of the most important GMAT prep and test approaches which can help you score in the 650 to 700 range.

4 Tips to Score in the 650 – 760 Range

Practice your pacing

Wouldn’t the GMAT be a whole lot easier if you did not have to think about timing? Timing is a huge issue and often curtails test takers from attaining their desired score. If you distribute the given time equally, you only have around two minutes per question. Planning your time accordingly is integral to success, spending less time on easier questions allows you to spend more time on more challenging ones. Different questions have different difficulty levels, so it is normal that some questions might take longer than others. Our advice is to forget about the timing aspect of your GMAT prep altogether, and instead focus on mastering the skills you need to answer the questions correctly. In this way you will find that timing issues take care of themselves. If you want to learn more pacing techniques, make sure to check out our video on time management.

Learn how to skim

This one might seem obvious – and you might even say: “Of course I know how to skim”. But do you really? A lot of people think that they are skimming a passage, when in fact they are skipping it. The difference between skimming and skipping is that skimming includes paying attention to the author’s tone and point of view, but without actually reading the passage word for word. When you find yourself being able to take away the important pieces of information from the passage, and understand what the author is trying to say, then it is safe to say that you have learned how to skim. Mastering the art of skimming can help you do well on the Verbal section, which can ultimately lead you to a 650 – 700 GMAT score.

Pay attention to transition words

We definitely do not mean to sound like your middle school English teacher, but paying attention to transition words could save you a whole lot of time on the GMAT. Transition words are used to show the relationship between sentences (or parts of sentences). For instance, if the author is using transition words such as “however”, “nevertheless”, “in spite of”, “on one hand” or “on the contrary”, then you would know that the author is trying to express a contrasting point. Even though you can understand that by reading the whole passage, paying attention to transition words can save you a lot of time.

Use an appropriate strategy to solve quant problems

No matter how well prepared you are, there are always going to be questions whose answers you are not entirely sure of. Of course, it should be your goal to reduce the chances of that happening, but the GMAT is not designed to be that easy. When you find yourself struggling to answer a question, at first it might seem like all of the answers make sense. For that reason, it is good to have multiple strategies to tackle all types of GMAT problem types.

  • Elimination: write down ABCDE on the scratch board, and work on eliminating the answers that do not make much sense. When you are left with 2 or 3 answers to pick from, the chances of getting the right one are much higher (you do the math).
  • Guessing: leaving questions unanswered on the GMAT is not a good practice, as it is not favored by the grading algorithm. That is why it is important that you answer all of the questions from a given section, even if that means guessing the answer to some questions that you are not sure about.
  • Graphical solution path: sometimes it is easier to solve a problem graphically, rather than taking the standard, mathematical approach. Our instructor, and director of curriculum development, Mike Diamond, talks about the graphical solution path in his videos. If you want to find out more about this approach, see how he solves the Snack Shop problem and the Rope problem using a graphical solution path.
  • Story telling: some problems on the GMAT might require you to put yourself in the story and retell it from your perspective. This is especially useful when you are given information about two or more entities relative to each other. For instance, For some questions like, John was three years older than Tim was 5 years ago. Tim will be 23 two years from now. How old is John now? Here putting yourself in the story and retelling it can help you make the information easy to follow

Which schools can a 650 – 700 GMAT score get you into?

A GMAT score in the 650 – 700 can definitely get you into some of the highest ranked MBA programs in the world, and our clients are proof of that.

Kyle

kyle scored a 650 after working with Apex and got accepted to Georgetown university
Kyle scored 650 on the GMAT and he was able to get into the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University. In his words:  I wouldn’t be in business school if I hadn’t gone through this process with an Apex tutor, not only from a scoring standpoint but also from a mental preparation standpoint.

Amy

amy scored a 690 on her GMAT and went to dukeAmy got into the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University with a GMAT score of 690. She says: After working with Apex I could look at a problem and know exactly what they were testing me on and the steps that I needed to take to get to the desired solution. They were always there to help and offered multiple solution paths in case the first one did not resonate.

Lohe

lohe scored a 690on her gmat and got into columbiaA GMAT score of 680 was able to help Lohe get into Columbia University. She says: When I started working with Apex we mostly focused on improving my stress and anxiety. So we worked on different kinds of breathing exercises and on different problem solving techniques that were not the usual math solutions. Once I was able to get comfortable with these techniques my speed and score increased a lot. It was a good mix of stress management and thinking out of the box.

 

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taking the gmat in Amsterdam
Posted on
27
May 2021

Taking the GMAT Exam in Amsterdam

Table of Contents:

  1. Who administers the GMAT test?
  2. What does the test center look like?
  3. Where are the test centers located?
  4. Test center holidays
  5. Top MBA programs in the area
  6. Tips
  7. Test Day FAQs

About ¾ of the way through your extensive GMAT prep you should begin to start planning your test day, including scheduling the test, preparing your trip to the test center, and even pre-visiting the test center so that you know exactly where it is. This guide is here to offer you all the required information related to taking the GMAT in Amsterdam

Who administers the GMAT test?

Pearson Professional Centers – administers the GMAT and EA exam on behalf of the GMAC. To find out more about the Pearson Professional test centers visit https://www.pearson.com/us/

What does the test center look like?

A Pearson Professional Center will include individual testing areas for each test taker with a separation screen between each test-taker.

Where are the test centers in Amsterdam?

This is the top location where test-takers generally had the best experience:

Compu’Train Amsterdamgmat test center in amsterdam

BCN Amsterdam Arena – Computrain
Hoogoorddreef 5
5th floor
1101 BA Amsterdam
Netherlands

By car:

From Central Amsterdam (25 minutes):

  • Take Nieuwezijds Voorburgwal to Raadhuisstraat
  • Head south on Spuistraat toward Vliegendesteeg
  • Continue onto Spui
  • Spui turns left and becomes Nieuwezijds Voorburgwal
  • Nieuwezijds Voorburgwal turns slightly left and becomes Raadhuisstraat
  • Take Stadhouderskade/S100, s110 and A2 to Hoogoorddreef in Amsterdam-Zuidoost
  • Continue on Hoogoorddreef to your destination

Test-takers’ review:

This test center was rated 4.0 by Google reviewers. Great training facility and very responsive staff. Lunch restaurant is good and well stocked with tons of choices to match any diet. Free coffee tea soda juices candy bars and fruit.

Test Center Holidays:

The most popular times for GMAT preparation and test-taking are during the holiday seasons. Be mindful of dates that you will not be able to take the GMAT or EA at any of the test centers mentioned above. Pearson test centers are closed during the following dates:

  • 1 Jan – New Year’s Day
  • 2 Apr – Good Friday  
  • 5 Apr – Easter Monday
  • 3 May – May Day
  • 31 May – Late May Bank Holiday  
  • 30 Aug – August Bank Holiday
  • 25 Dec – Christmas Day
  • 26 Dec – Boxing Day
  • 27 Dec – Christmas Holiday
  • 28 Dec – Boxing Day Holiday

Top MBA programs in Amsterdam:

Tips:

  • During the test there will not be complete silence – you will be able to hear noise from other test takers so it is best to prepare for this by studying for the exam in similar scenarios. This can prepare you for any distractions (such as coughing, sneezing, or computer clicking sounds) that might occur while taking your exam.
  • Try to spend some time actually prepping in the lobby of the test center weeks/days in advance of your exam date. Since the place will be familiar to you come test day this can help curb test anxiety should you have any.
  • Here is a helpful test day planning guide: Link to guide
  • Find a test day checklist here: link to checklist

Test Day FAQs

Here are the top 5 questions that clients ask us about exam day information:

  • Are you allowed to listen to music while taking the GMAT exam?

You are not allowed to listen to music while taking the GMAT exam and you are not allowed to wear earphones as well.

  • What should I do if I fall sick on the exam day?

If you do not feel well come exam day you will have to make the decision as to whether or not you can take the test and perform at your best. Most people will not be able to do this so it will be best to cancel it. If you do so on the day of the exam you will incur a loss of your full $250 exam fee. If you cancel the exam 7 days in advance you will be charged a penalty of $50. If it is the first time that you will sit the exam and you are up for sitting through a 4 hour test, this may be a good opportunity to experience the test as you have the ability to cancel the score right afterwards if you are unhappy with it. Ultimately, it is best to take the GMAT when you are feeling your best as this will result in your optimum test performance.

  • What can I bring with me to the test center?

You are allowed in the test center with the following:

  • GMAT approved identification
  • Appointment confirmation letter or email you received from Pearson VUE
  • Prescription eyeglasses
  • Light sweater or light non-outerwear jacket
  • Comfort items only if they were pre-approved as an accommodation received in advance

Any additional personal belongings that you bring with you such as your cell phone, bag, snacks, and earphones will need to be stored in one of the provided lockers. You may eat your snack during the breaks. Any cell phone use throughout the test time (including breaks) is prohibited.

The test center will provide you with everything that you need in order to take the test including scratch paper and a pencil.

  • Should I wear a mask during the exam?

At the test centers above they strongly recommend that you wear a face mask or some type of face-covering in the test center and for the duration of your test to protect yourself and others. Test centers do not provide face masks for candidates.

Please note that if you have any flu-like symptoms upon arrival at the test center, you may be requested to reschedule your exam for another time when you are in full health.

  • What can I expect at the test center?

A usual test center is typically quite small. Once you arrive you will have to provide the administrator with the relevant documents and while these are being processed you will be asked to wait in the waiting area. In this area, you can still access all your personal belongings up until you are called into the testing room.

Once in the room, you will be allocated an individual exam station where you will find a computer.

For any questions or comments please reach out to us at www.apexgmat.com.
To speak to an Apex instructor about your GMAT prep, schedule a call HERE.

Read more
taking the gmat in beijing article
Posted on
25
May 2021

Taking the GMAT Exam in Beijing

Table of Contents:

  1. Who administers the GMAT test?
  2. What does the test center look like?
  3. Where are the test centers located?
  4. Test center holidays
  5. Top MBA programs in the area
  6. Tips
  7. Test Day FAQs

About ¾ of the way through your extensive GMAT prep you should begin to start planning your test day, including scheduling the test, preparing your trip to the test center, and even pre-visiting the test center so that you know exactly where it is. This guide is here to offer you all the required information related to taking the GMAT in Beijing

Who administers the GMAT test?

Pearson Professional Centers – administers the GMAT and EA exam on behalf of the GMAC. To find out more about the Pearson Professional test centers visit https://www.pearson.com/us/

What does the test center look like?

A Pearson Professional Center will include individual testing areas for each test taker with a separation screen between each test-taker.

Where are the test centers in Beijing?

This is the top location where test-takers generally had the best experience:

Pearson Professional Centers-Beijing, China
gmat test location in beijing

China
Beijing
Haidian District
6 Southern Road Capital Gym
Rm 1153, New Century Hotel Office Tower
100044

 

Test-takers’ review:

There are no test takers reviews to report about this test center at this time. 

Test Center Holidays:

The most popular times for GMAT preparation and test-taking are during the holiday seasons. Be mindful of dates that you will not be able to take the GMAT or EA at any of the test centers mentioned above. Pearson test centers are closed during the following dates:

  • 1 Jan – New Year’s Day 
  • 25-28 Jan – Chinese New Year/ Lunar New Year
  • 4 Apr – Qingming Festival
  • 10 Apr – Good Friday
  • 11 Apr – Holy Sunday
  • 13 Apr – Easter Monday
  • 30 Apr – Buddha’s Birthday
  • 1 May – Labour Day
  • 25 Jun – Dragon Boat Festival
  • 1 Jul – Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Establishment
  • 1 Oct – National Day of the People’s Republic of China
  • 26 Oct – Double Ninth Festival
  • 25 Dec – Christmas Day
  • 26 Dec – Boxing Day

Top MBA programs in Beijing:

Tsinghua University  

Tips:

  • During the test there will not be complete silence – you will be able to hear noise from other test takers so it is best to prepare for this by studying for the exam in similar scenarios. This can prepare you for any distractions (such as coughing, sneezing, or computer clicking sounds) that might occur while taking your exam.
  • Try to spend some time actually prepping in the lobby of the test center weeks/days in advance of your exam date. Since the place will be familiar to you come test day this can help curb test anxiety should you have any.
  • Here is a helpful test day planning guide: Link to guide
  • Find a test day checklist here: link to checklist

Test Day FAQs

Here are the top 5 questions that clients ask us about exam day information:

  • Are you allowed to listen to music while taking the GMAT exam?

You are not allowed to listen to music while taking the GMAT exam and you are not allowed to wear earphones as well.

  • What should I do if I fall sick on the exam day?

If you do not feel well come exam day you will have to make the decision as to whether or not you can take the test and perform at your best. Most people will not be able to do this so it will be best to cancel it. If you do so on the day of the exam you will incur a loss of your full $250 exam fee. If you cancel the exam 7 days in advance you will be charged a penalty of $50. If it is the first time that you will sit the exam and you are up for sitting through a 4 hour test, this may be a good opportunity to experience the test as you have the ability to cancel the score right afterwards if you are unhappy with it. Ultimately, it is best to take the GMAT when you are feeling your best as this will result in your optimum test performance.

  • What can I bring with me to the test center?

You are allowed in the test center with the following:

  • GMAT approved identification
  • Appointment confirmation letter or email you received from Pearson VUE
  • Prescription eyeglasses
  • Light sweater or light non-outerwear jacket
  • Comfort items only if they were pre-approved as an accommodation received in advance

Any additional personal belongings that you bring with you such as your cell phone, bag, snacks, and earphones will need to be stored in one of the provided lockers. You may eat your snack during the breaks. Any cell phone use throughout the test time (including breaks) is prohibited.

The test center will provide you with everything that you need in order to take the test including scratch paper and a pencil.

  • Should I wear a mask during the exam?

At the test centers above they strongly recommend that you wear a face mask or some type of face-covering in the test center and for the duration of your test to protect yourself and others. Test centers do not provide face masks for candidates.

Please note that if you have any flu-like symptoms upon arrival at the test center, you may be requested to reschedule your exam for another time when you are in full health.

  • What can I expect at the test center?

A usual test center is typically quite small. Once you arrive you will have to provide the administrator with the relevant documents and while these are being processed you will be asked to wait in the waiting area. In this area, you can still access all your personal belongings up until you are called into the testing room.

Once in the room, you will be allocated an individual exam station where you will find a computer.

For any questions or comments please reach out to us at www.apexgmat.com.
To speak to an Apex instructor about your GMAT prep, schedule a call HERE.

Read more
fundan mba program in shanghai
Posted on
20
May 2021

Taking the GMAT Exam in Shanghai

Table of Contents:

  1. Who administers the GMAT test?
  2. What does the test center look like?
  3. Where are the test centers located?
  4. Test center holidays
  5. Top MBA programs in the area
  6. Tips
  7. Test Day FAQs

About ¾ of the way through your extensive GMAT prep you should begin to start planning your test day, including scheduling the test, preparing your trip to the test center, and even pre-visiting the test center so that you know exactly where it is. This guide is here to offer you all the required information related to taking the GMAT in Shanghai

Who administers the GMAT test?

Pearson Professional Centers – administers the GMAT and EA exam on behalf of the GMAC. To find out more about the Pearson Professional test centers visit https://www.pearson.com/us/

What does the test center look like?

A Pearson Professional Center will include individual testing areas for each test taker with a separation screen between each test-taker.

Where are the test centers in Shanghai?

This is the top location where test-takers generally had the best experience:

Pearson Professional Centers-Shanghai South, Chinagmat test center in shanghai

China
Shanghai
Xuhui District
333 Tianyaoqiao Road
Room 805, 8/F, Ascendas Plaza
200030

By car:

From Central Park (17 minutes):

  • Take 建国西路 and 瑞金二路 to 瑞金一路
  • Take 延安中路 to 愚园路 in 静安区
  • Turn right onto 愚园路

Test-takers’ review:

There are no test takers reviews to report about this test center at this time. 

Test Center Holidays:

The most popular times for GMAT preparation and test-taking are during the holiday seasons. Be mindful of dates that you will not be able to take the GMAT or EA at any of the test centers mentioned above. Pearson test centers are closed during the following dates:

  • 1 Jan – New Year’s Day 
  • 25-28 Jan – Chinese New Year/ Lunar New Year
  • 4 Apr – Qingming Festival
  • 10 Apr – Good Friday
  • 11 Apr – Holy Sunday
  • 13 Apr – Easter Monday
  • 30 Apr – Buddha’s Birthday
  • 1 May – Labour Day
  • 25 Jun – Dragon Boat Festival
  • 1 Jul – Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Establishment
  • 1 Oct – National Day of the People’s Republic of China
  • 26 Oct – Double Ninth Festival
  • 25 Dec – Christmas Day
  • 26 Dec – Boxing Day

Top MBA programs in Shanghai:

  • FUDAN School of Management
  • CEIBS- China Europe International School of Business

Tips:

  • During the test there will not be complete silence – you will be able to hear noise from other test takers so it is best to prepare for this by studying for the exam in similar scenarios. This can prepare you for any distractions (such as coughing, sneezing, or computer clicking sounds) that might occur while taking your exam.
  • Try to spend some time actually prepping in the lobby of the test center weeks/days in advance of your exam date. Since the place will be familiar to you come test day this can help curb test anxiety should you have any.
  • Here is a helpful test day planning guide: Link to guide
  • Find a test day checklist here: link to checklist

Test Day FAQs

Here are the top 5 questions that clients ask us about exam day information:

  • Are you allowed to listen to music while taking the GMAT exam?

You are not allowed to listen to music while taking the GMAT exam and you are not allowed to wear earphones as well.

  • What should I do if I fall sick on the exam day?

If you do not feel well come exam day you will have to make the decision as to whether or not you can take the test and perform at your best. Most people will not be able to do this so it will be best to cancel it. If you do so on the day of the exam you will incur a loss of your full $250 exam fee. If you cancel the exam 7 days in advance you will be charged a penalty of $50. If it is the first time that you will sit the exam and you are up for sitting through a 4 hour test, this may be a good opportunity to experience the test as you have the ability to cancel the score right afterwards if you are unhappy with it. Ultimately, it is best to take the GMAT when you are feeling your best as this will result in your optimum test performance.

  • What can I bring with me to the test center?

You are allowed in the test center with the following:

  • GMAT approved identification
  • Appointment confirmation letter or email you received from Pearson VUE
  • Prescription eyeglasses
  • Light sweater or light non-outerwear jacket
  • Comfort items only if they were pre-approved as an accommodation received in advance

Any additional personal belongings that you bring with you such as your cell phone, bag, snacks, and earphones will need to be stored in one of the provided lockers. You may eat your snack during the breaks. Any cell phone use throughout the test time (including breaks) is prohibited.

The test center will provide you with everything that you need in order to take the test including scratch paper and a pencil.

  • Should I wear a mask during the exam?

At the test centers above they strongly recommend that you wear a face mask or some type of face-covering in the test center and for the duration of your test to protect yourself and others. Test centers do not provide face masks for candidates.

Please note that if you have any flu-like symptoms upon arrival at the test center, you may be requested to reschedule your exam for another time when you are in full health.

  • What can I expect at the test center?

A usual test center is typically quite small. Once you arrive you will have to provide the administrator with the relevant documents and while these are being processed you will be asked to wait in the waiting area. In this area, you can still access all your personal belongings up until you are called into the testing room.

Once in the room, you will be allocated an individual exam station where you will find a computer.

For any questions or comments please reach out to us at www.apexgmat.com.
To speak to an Apex instructor about your GMAT prep, schedule a call HERE.

Read more
Featured Video Play Icon
Posted on
19
May 2021

GMAT Algebra Problem – Parts – Hotdogs & Donuts

GMAT Algebra Problem Introduction

Hi guys. Today I’m here with a classic GMAT Algebra problem, what we call a parts problem. And if you take a look at this problem you’re going to realize that it just looks like a bunch of algebra. But the key here is in how you frame it. We’ve got this diner or whatnot selling hot dogs and then after that point, so imagine like a timeline, they start selling donuts. Then they give us a piece of information about hot dogs to donuts over that course of secondary time but then give us this overarching total number of food products sold.

Distill The Ration

So what we need to do are two steps: the first one is fairly straightforward. We see that we have to get rid of the hot dogs that were sold in advance in order to distill the ratio but then the ratio can seem very, very complex, especially because it just tells us seven times and a lot of times the GMAT will do this as a way to throw us off the scent. So when we have seven times, what that means is we have eight parts. That is it’s saying for every one of these we have one, two, three, four, five, six, seven of these. Meaning in total there are eight. So while seven is kind of a scary number, eight is a number we can divide by easily. You always want to look for that when you’re given a ratio of one thing to another especially when they say something times as many.

Solving the GMAT Problem

We take that thirty thousand two hundred knock off the fifty four hundred and get to twenty four thousand eight hundred and lo and behold that’s divisible by eight meaning each part is going to be 3100. Notice there’s no complex division there, 24 divided by 8, 800 divided by 8 and that’s the sort of mental math we can expect from the GMAT always. Which as you’ve seen before: if you’re doing that you’re doing something wrong.

Each part is 3100 and we’re concerned with the seven parts so we can either scale that 3100 up by seven into 21700, again the math works out super smoothly or we can take the 24800 knock off 3100 and get to that 21700. Notice in the answer choices there’s a few things to address sort of common errors that might be made.

Reviewing the Answer Signals

On one of the answer choices what you’re looking at is dividing the total, the 30 200 by eight and multiplying by seven that is seven eighths of it without getting rid of those first 5400. Another answer is close to our 21700 correct answer and this is also a fairly reliable signal from the GMAT.

When they give you a range of answers but two of them are kind of tightly clustered together a lot of times it’s going to be one of the two and that second one there is to prevent you from too roughly estimating. But at the same time if you’re short on time or just in general you want to hone down and understand what you’re supposed to do that serves as a really strong signal. And then one of the answer choices is the 1/8 of it rather than the 7/8.

Clustered Answer Choices

I want to speak a little more deeply about that signal about those two tightly clustered answer choices because as I said it can help you narrow to a very quick 50/50 when you’re constrained for time or this problem is just one that’s really not up your alley but it also can be leveraged in a really, really neat way.

If we assume that one or the other is the answer choice we can differentiate these two different answer choices by what they’re divisible by and so notice the 21700 is very clearly, with strong mental math is divisible by seven. Where the other one is not. Also neither of them are divisible by eight. We can look at these two say okay one of them is probably right, one of them is divisible by seven, the other one is not, so there’s our right answer and we can move on to the next problem. So I hope this helps. Write your comments and questions below. Subscribe to our channel at Apex GMAT here and give us a call if we can ever help you.

To work on similar GMAT algebra problem/s see this link: Work Rate Problem.

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