5 Executive Assessment Test Prep Strategies to Help You Prepare Effectively
Posted on
23
Sep 2021

5 EA Test Prep Strategies to Help You Prepare Effectively

By: Apex GMAT 
Contributer: Altea Sulollari
Date: September 23, 2021

Let’s set the scene: you are a working professional looking to get into an Executive MBA program in order to give you a competitive edge to advance your career. That sure seems like a good plan, but there is one step that you’re missing: you need to take an Executive Assessment exam before getting admitted to a top EMBA program.

The executive assessment is similar in structure to the GMAT exam and it aims to test similar skills but also those that you have acquired during your career. As such, there is no need to extensively prepare for the exam, however, there are a few strategies that can help you get the score you’re aiming for, and we are here to tell you all about them.

The Executive Assessment (EA) Exam – Explained

The Executive Assessment exam is an admissions exam designed for working professionals who are aiming to get into different Executive MBA (EMBA) programs. The exam tests on-the-job skills like problem-solving and critical thinking. It is usually done over a shorter period of time as it includes fewer sections than the GMAT exam, and that is why you do not necessarily need to spend an extensive period of time preparing for this exam.

The EA is similar in structure to the GMAT exam. However, it only features 3 main sections (the Verbal section, the Quantitative Reasoning section, and the Integrated Reasoning section), as opposed to the GMAT which also contains an additional AWA section. When it comes to the question difficulty, the Executive Assessment is regarded as an easier exam than the GMAT, as it is not item-adaptive, meaning that it does not get easier or harder depending on the previous question. Rather, the Executive Assessment exam is section-adaptive, thus it changes after a block of questions. 

The Executive Assessment contains a total of 40 questions that are to be completed within a 90-minute time frame. There are 12 questions in the Integrated Reasoning section, and 14 questions on the Quantitative Reasoning and in the Verbal section respectively. The score ranges from 100-200 points. Keep in mind that a 150+ score is considered a good enough score that can get you into a top program.  

This exam has a shorter time duration as it contains fewer sections and it is often regarded as an easier exam compared to the GMAT. 

5+ EA Test Prep Strategies 

Here are the best strategies to help you with your EA test prep:

Provide yourself with enough time to practice and create a schedule!

Refrain from leaving the bulk of your prep to the last 2 weeks. Instead, create a schedule and try to follow it rigorously so you can work a bit every day. It is true that you do not need as much preparation before you take the Executive Assessment exam as you would when taking the GMAT exam. However, it is a good idea to be prepared for everything that will be coming your way so you know what to expect on test day. That is why you need to set time aside for your EA prep. You’d also want to dedicate short periods of time to your prep instead of a full 2-3 hours at a time. That way, you won’t feel overwhelmed and you’ll be able to see progress in a shorter period of time.

Practice a lot!

The more practice you get before you take the actual exam, the more familiar you’ll get with the structure of the exam and the question types. That will make you feel more confident come test day. Practice will also help you get a feel of what the actual Executive Assessment will be like on test day. You won’t know what to expect until you practice with mock tests and see for yourself.

Pro tip: Apart from the books, guides, and mock exams, you can also try to include prep videos into your routine. EA prep videos are a great method that will help you cover more material in a shorter period of time, and you also won’t get bored from reading all the time.

Stay focused!

Try to stay focused on your schedule and avoid distractions that will draw your attention away from the exam prep. Keeping yourself focused will help you get more done and in a shorter period of time. That is why you should refrain from using your phone during your EA prep time. You can also create To-Do lists with small tasks to complete each day. In that way, you’ll know what you have to do each day in order to see progress during your preparation, and you’ll be more focused and motivated to work harder.

Time yourself!

The Executive Assessment is a timed exam. Therefore, the best way to go about preparing for it successfully is to practice under a time constraint. That will help you gauge how well you’ll perform under time pressure and will help you get used to the timing consideration.

Pro tip: ApexGMAT’s tutors suggest practicing without time constraints in the beginning. Once you’re more familiar with the test structure and the question types, you can introduce the concept of time in your test prep. That way, you will be able to focus on mastering the concepts before including the added level of time into the mix.

Try EA tutoring

Hire an EA private tutor to help you with your preparation. A specialized tutor will help you focus on what is important and will help you get the most out of your prep. They will also know how to tailor the experience to your own specific needs so you’ll be able to master the exam and use your time strategically.

If you are interested in hiring a private tutor to help you with your Executive Assessment test prep, you can schedule a time to discuss your goals with a top-scoring EA instructor here!

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Berlin
Posted on
21
Sep 2021

Taking the GMAT Exam in Berlin

Table of Contents:

  1. Who administers the GMAT test?
  2. What does the test center look like?
  3. Where are the test centers located?
  4. Test center holidays
  5. Top MBA programs in the area
  6. Tips
  7. Test Day FAQs

About ¾ of the way through your extensive GMAT prep you should begin to start planning your test day, including scheduling the test, preparing your trip to the test center, and even pre-visiting the test center so that you know exactly where it is. This guide is here to offer you all the required information related to taking the GMAT exam in Berlin.

Who administers the GMAT test?

The GMAT exam in Berlin is administered in a computer training school.

What does the test center look like?

The location will include individual testing areas for each test taker with a separation screen between each test-taker.

Where are the test centers in Berlin?

These are the top locations where test-takers generally had the best experience:

New Horizons CLC – Puder & Rahn GmbH

Berlin GMAT Test Center

Berliner Str.112A
1.OG/1st. Floor
13189 Berlin
Germany
Phone: +49 30 2063950

 

By car:

From Downtown Berlin (20 minutes):

  • Head northeast on Franz-Mehring-Platz toward Singerstraße
  • Take Mollstraße, Prenzlauer Allee and Neumannstraße to Borkumstraße
  • Turn left onto Borkumstraße
  • Turn right onto Berliner Str.
Test-takers’ review:

This test center was rated 3.3 by Google reviewers. The test takers mentioned that the staff was friendly and helpful, and the location was easy to find. 

Test Center Holidays

The most popular times for GMAT preparation and test-taking are during the holiday seasons. Be mindful of dates that you will not be able to take the GMAT or EA at any of the test centers mentioned above. Pearson test centers are closed during the following dates:

  • 1 Jan – New Year’s Day 
  • 6 Jan – Three King’s Day
  • 24 Feb – Fasching
  • 8 Mar – International Women’s Day
  • 10 Apr – Good Friday
  • 12 Apr – Easter Sunday
  • 13 Apr – Easter Monday 
  • 1 May – May Day 
  • 8 May – Victory in Europe Day
  • 10 May- Mother’s Day
  • 21 May – Ascension Day
  • 21 May – Father’s Day
  • 1 Jun – Whit Monday
  • 11 Jun – Corpus Christi
  • 15 Aug – Assumption Day
  • 20 Sep- World Children’s Day
  • 3 Oct – German Unity Day
  • 31 Oct – Reformation Day
  • 1 Nov – All Saints’ Day
  • 18 Nov – Repentance Day
  • 25 Dec – Christmas Day
  • 26 Dec – St. Stephen’s Day

Top MBA programs in Berlin

  • ESMT Berlin

Tips:

  • During the test there will not be complete silence – you will be able to hear noise from other test takers so it is best to prepare for this by studying for the exam in similar scenarios. This can prepare you for any distractions (such as coughing, sneezing, or computer clicking sounds) that might occur while taking your exam.
  • Try to spend some time actually prepping in the lobby of the test center weeks/days in advance of your exam date. Since the place will be familiar to you come test day this can help curb test anxiety should you have any.

Test Day FAQs

Here are the top 5 questions that clients ask us about exam day information:

  • Are you allowed to listen to music while taking the GMAT exam?

You are not allowed to listen to music while taking the GMAT exam and you are not allowed to wear earphones as well.

  • What should I do if I fall sick on the exam day?

If you do not feel well come exam day you will have to make the decision as to whether or not you can take the test and perform at your best. Most people will not be able to do this so it will be best to cancel it. If you do so on the day of the exam you will incur a loss of your full $250 exam fee. If you cancel the exam 7 days in advance you will be charged a penalty of $50. If it is the first time that you will sit the exam and you are up for sitting through a 4 hour test, this may be a good opportunity to experience the test as you have the ability to cancel the score right afterwards if you are unhappy with it. Ultimately, it is best to take the GMAT when you are feeling your best as this will result in your optimum test performance.

  • What can I bring with me to the test center?

You are allowed in the test center with the following:

  • GMAT approved identification
  • Appointment confirmation letter or email you received from Pearson VUE
  • Prescription eyeglasses
  • Light sweater or light non-outerwear jacket
  • Comfort items only if they were pre-approved as an accommodation received in advance

Any additional personal belongings that you bring with you such as your cell phone, bag, snacks, and earphones will need to be stored in one of the provided lockers. You may eat your snack during the breaks. Any cell phone use throughout the test time (including breaks) is prohibited.

The test center will provide you with everything that you need in order to take the test including scratch paper and a pencil.

  • Should I wear a mask during the exam?

At the test centers above they strongly recommend that you wear a face mask or some type of face-covering in the test center and for the duration of your test to protect yourself and others. Test centers do not provide face masks for candidates.

Please note that if you have any flu-like symptoms upon arrival at the test center, you may be requested to reschedule your exam for another time when you are in full health.

  • What can I expect at the test center?

A usual test center is typically quite small. Once you arrive you will have to provide the administrator with the relevant documents and while these are being processed you will be asked to wait in the waiting area. In this area, you can still access all your personal belongings up until you are called into the testing room.

Once in the room, you will be allocated an individual exam station where you will find a computer.

For any questions or comments please reach out to us at www.apexgmat.com.
To speak to an Apex instructor about your GMAT prep, schedule a call HERE.

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Taking the GMAT in Tel Aviv
Posted on
09
Sep 2021

Taking the GMAT Exam in Tel Aviv

Table of Contents:

  1. Who administers the GMAT test?
  2. What does the test center look like?
  3. Where are the test centers located?
  4. Test center holidays
  5. Top MBA programs in the area
  6. Tips
  7. Test Day FAQs

About ¾ of the way through your extensive GMAT prep you should begin to start planning your test day, including scheduling the test, preparing your trip to the test center, and even pre-visiting the test center so that you know exactly where it is. This guide is here to offer you all the required information related to taking the GMAT exam in Tel Aviv.

Who administers the GMAT test?

Pearson Professional Centers – administers the GMAT and EA exam on behalf of the GMAC. To find out more about the Pearson Professional test centers visit https://www.pearson.com/us/.

What does the test center look like?

The location will include individual testing areas for each test taker with a separation screen between each test-taker.

Where are the test centers in Tel Aviv?

These are the top locations where test-takers generally had the best experience:

Pearson Professional Centers-Tel Aviv, Israel

Tel Aviv GMAT Center

2 Derech Ben Gurion
BSR Building 1. 9th floor
Ramat Gan
Israel

 

By car:

From Central Tel Aviv (9 minutes):

  • Take Route 481 to Harei HaGil’ad St in Ramat Gan
  • Turn left onto Harei HaGil’ad St
  • Follow Route 482 to David Ben Gurion Rd
Test Center Holidays

The most popular times for GMAT preparation and test-taking are during the holiday seasons. Be mindful of dates that you will not be able to take the GMAT or EA at any of the test centers mentioned above. Pearson test centers are closed during the following dates:

  • 1 Jan – New Year’s Day 
  • 21 Mar – Human Rights Day
  • 10 Apr – Good Friday   
  • 13 Apr – Family Day
  • 27 Apr – Freedom Day 
  • 1 May – Workers’ Day
  • 16 Jun – Youth Day
  • 9 Aug – National Women’s Day
  • 10 Aug – Public Holiday
  • 24 Sep – Heritage Day
  • 16 Dec – Day of Reconciliation
  • 25 Dec – Christmas Day
  • 26 Dec – Day of Goodwill

Top MBA programs in Tel Aviv

  • Tel Aviv University – Leon Recanati Graduate School of Business Administration

Tips:

  • During the test there will not be complete silence – you will be able to hear noise from other test takers so it is best to prepare for this by studying for the exam in similar scenarios. This can prepare you for any distractions (such as coughing, sneezing, or computer clicking sounds) that might occur while taking your exam.
  • Try to spend some time actually prepping in the lobby of the test center weeks/days in advance of your exam date. Since the place will be familiar to you come test day this can help curb test anxiety should you have any.

Test Day FAQs

Here are the top 5 questions that clients ask us about exam day information:

  • Are you allowed to listen to music while taking the GMAT exam?

You are not allowed to listen to music while taking the GMAT exam and you are not allowed to wear earphones as well.

  • What should I do if I fall sick on the exam day?

If you do not feel well come exam day you will have to make the decision as to whether or not you can take the test and perform at your best. Most people will not be able to do this so it will be best to cancel it. If you do so on the day of the exam you will incur a loss of your full $250 exam fee. If you cancel the exam 7 days in advance you will be charged a penalty of $50. If it is the first time that you will sit the exam and you are up for sitting through a 4 hour test, this may be a good opportunity to experience the test as you have the ability to cancel the score right afterwards if you are unhappy with it. Ultimately, it is best to take the GMAT when you are feeling your best as this will result in your optimum test performance.

  • What can I bring with me to the test center?

You are allowed in the test center with the following:

  • GMAT approved identification
  • Appointment confirmation letter or email you received from Pearson VUE
  • Prescription eyeglasses
  • Light sweater or light non-outerwear jacket
  • Comfort items only if they were pre-approved as an accommodation received in advance

Any additional personal belongings that you bring with you such as your cell phone, bag, snacks, and earphones will need to be stored in one of the provided lockers. You may eat your snack during the breaks. Any cell phone use throughout the test time (including breaks) is prohibited.

The test center will provide you with everything that you need in order to take the test including scratch paper and a pencil.

  • Should I wear a mask during the exam?

At the test centers above they strongly recommend that you wear a face mask or some type of face-covering in the test center and for the duration of your test to protect yourself and others. Test centers do not provide face masks for candidates.

Please note that if you have any flu-like symptoms upon arrival at the test center, you may be requested to reschedule your exam for another time when you are in full health.

  • What can I expect at the test center?

A usual test center is typically quite small. Once you arrive you will have to provide the administrator with the relevant documents and while these are being processed you will be asked to wait in the waiting area. In this area, you can still access all your personal belongings up until you are called into the testing room.

Once in the room, you will be allocated an individual exam station where you will find a computer.

For any questions or comments please reach out to us at www.apexgmat.com.
To speak to an Apex instructor about your GMAT prep, schedule a call HERE.

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How-to GMAT: No Calculator? Use These Mental Math Tips Instead
Posted on
07
Sep 2021

How-to GMAT: No Calculator? Use These Mental Math Tips Instead

The GMAT is an exam largely focused on numbers and numerical data. And while doing math on the GMAT should be avoided sometimes it is inevitable. True, the test-taker is given a calculator for the duration of the Integrated Reasoning section but the same cannot be said for the Quantitative Reasoning Section. 

This article is going to provide some smart calculation shortcuts and mental math tips to help you go through some arithmetical questions without losing too much time and help you get a higher score on the GMAT Quant.

The Basics

Before explaining any methods for dividing and multiplying with ease, let’s make sure we have revised a few simple rules:

  • Numbers with an even last digit are divisible by 2 – 576 is and 943 is not;
  • Numbers with a sum of digits divisible by 3 are also divisible by 3 – 3,465 for example (3+4+6+5=18);
  • If the last 2 digits of a number a divisible by 4, the number itself is divisible by 4 – 5,624 for example (because 24/4=6);
  • Numbers with last digit 0 or 5 are divisible by 5;
  • Numbers that can be divided by both 2 and 3 can be divided by 6;
  • Similar to numbers divisible by 3, numbers divisible by 9 must have a sum of digits divisible by 9 – 6,453 for example;
  • If the last digit of a number is 0 it is divisible by 10;

With that out of the way, we can move onto some more advanced mental math techniques.

Avoid division at all costs

Don’t divide unless there is no other option. And that is especially true with long division. The reason why long division is so perilous is that it is very easy to make a careless mistake as there are usually several steps included in the calculation, it takes too much time, and to be honest, few people are comfortable doing it.

Fortunately, the GMAT doesn’t test the candidates’ human-calculator skills but rather their capacity to think outside the box and show creativity in their solution paths, especially when under pressure – exactly what business schools look for.

However, sometimes you cannot avoid division, and when that is the case remember: Factoring is your best friend. Always simplify fractions especially if you’ll need to turn them into decimals. For example, if you have 234/26 don’t start immediately trying to calculate the result. Instead, factor them little by little until you receive something like 18/2 which is a lot easier to calculate.

A tip for factoring is to always start with smaller numbers as they are easier to use (2 is easier to use compared to 4, 6, or 8) and also look for nearby round numbers. 

If you have to calculate 256/4 it would be far less tedious and time-consuming to represent 256 as 240+16 and calculate 240/4+16/4=60+4=64. Another example is 441/3. If we express it like 450-9 it is far easier to calculate 450/3-9/3=150-3=147.

Dividing and Multiplying by 5

Sometimes when you have to divide and multiply by 5 (you’ll have to do it a lot) it would be easier to substitute the number with 10/2. It might not always be suitable for your situation but more often than not it can be utilized in order to save some time.

Using 9s

With most problems, you could safely substitute 9 with 10-1. For example, if you have to calculate 46(9) you can express it as 46(10 – 1) which is a lot more straightforward to compute as 46(10) – 46(1) = 460 – 46 = 414

You can also use the same method for other numbers such as 11, 8, 15, 100, etc:

18(11) = 18(10 + 1) = 180 + 18 = 198

28(8) = 28(10 – 2) = 280 – 56 = 224

22(15) = 22(10 + 5) = 220 + 110 = 330

26(99) = 26(100 – 1) = 2600 – 26 = 2574

Dividing by 7

The easiest way to check if a number is divisible by 7 is to find the nearest number you know is divisible by 7. For instance, if you want to check if you can divide 98 by 7 you should look for the nearest multiple of 7. In this instance either 70, 77, or 84. Start adding 7 until you reach the number: 70 + 7 = 77 + 7 = 84 + 7 = 91 + 7 = 98. The answer is yes, 98 is divisible by 7 and it equals 14

Squaring

When you have to find the square of a double-digit number it might be easier to break the number into components. For example, 22^2 would be calculated like this:

22^2
= (20 + 2)(20 + 2)
= 400 + 40 + 40 + 4
= 484

Similarly, if you have to find the square of 39 instead of calculating (30 + 9)(30 +9) you could express it like this:

39^2
= (40 – 1)(40 – 1)
= 1600 – 40 – 40 + 1
= 1521

You can use the same approach when multiplying almost any double-digit numbers, not only squaring. For example 37 times 73:

(40 – 3)(70 + 3)
= 2800 + 120 – 210 – 9
= 2701

Conclusion

This ends the list of mental math tips and tricks you can utilize to make the Quant section a bit less laborious. Keep in mind that no strategy or shortcut would be able to compensate for the lack of proper prep so it all comes down not only to practicing but doing so the right way.

For more information regarding the GMAT Calculator, GMAT Calculator & Mental Math – All You Need To Know, is a very insightful article to read.

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At-Home GMAT Prep: A Handy Guide
Posted on
02
Sep 2021

At-Home GMAT Prep: A Handy Guide

Ready to take the next step in your academic career and select an MBA program that will open new doors for you? Well first, you need to take one of the most important exams of your life – the GMAT. This is not something you can take easily as it can potentially score you some scholarships that will help fund your education and it’s one of those things that employers will want to take a look at. That’s why people spend months preparing for the GMAT. That being said, Apex tutors suggest a prep time period of 90 to 120 days.

So, to make the process easier for you, we came up with a guide full of the best tips and tricks that will help you prepare for the GMAT at home, along with some common mistakes to avoid when prepping.

The 2 Main Benefits of At-Home GMAT Prep

It essentially comes down to you to work hard and follow some best practices. Here’s how at-home self-prep will help you succeed:

  • You’ll be able to study in a familiar place. That will make you more comfortable and having a designated GMAT prep space will keep you more focused on your progress.
  • This is a good opportunity for you to study at your own pace and at a schedule that best suits you and your needs. This is definitely a much more convenient alternative than any GMAT prep class that you can take to help you prep.

Top 5 Tips To Follow for a Successful At-Home GMAT Prep

Here are the top 5 best practices to follow when preparing for the GMAT at home:

Find a Good Location

What you want to do is have a designated space where you sit down every day and work on the GMAT. You’d want to pick a place where there are no distractions and where you’ll be able to get work done without being bothered. One thing to keep in mind is that you don’t want to get too comfortable as you actually want to get some work done and not just end up laying down and napping every time you decide to study for the GMAT.

Give Yourself Enough Time

Make sure to start early with your GMAT preparation as the more time you have to work on improving, the higher your chances of succeeding and getting a higher score. That’s why you’d want to give yourself a minimum of 3 months to prepare depending on your prior knowledge and the level of preparation that you’ll need to succeed.

Follow a Structured Schedule

As soon as you decide to start preparing for the GMAT, you’re going to have to come up with a personalized schedule that you have to follow until the exam day. Following a schedule where you have to practice a bit every day instead of cramming everything on the last week, will keep you more focused. It will also not overwork you and you’ll have just enough time to go through every section in detail and also some extra time to take some mock tests to practice your knowledge.

Practice, Practice, Practice!

You know what they say: practice makes perfect. Well, they’re not wrong! The more practice you get before taking the actual exam, the better, especially because mock tests help you point out the areas that you need to work harder on. Mock exams also help you get used to the exam’s format and scoring system so you won’t have trouble navigating the exam in the future.

To make things easier, here are a few alternatives where you can get practice tests and official materials to practice on:

Learn to Manage Your Time!

The test-takers’ #1 pitfall is not focusing on the time when preparing for the GMAT, being well-aware that GMAT is a timed exam. We suggest practicing without a time constraint at first, just so you can get used to the format and the concepts. After you get a better understanding of what to expect, you can start timing yourself. You’d want to practice with a timer in order to actually see how well you’d perform in the real GMAT exam. Time pressure is a real thing, and what you don’t want to do is show up and not be able to finish your test on time.

Top 3 Mistakes To Avoid When Preparing for the GMAT

Now that we went over some of the best tips, let’s talk about some common mistakes that students make that you definitely need to avoid:

Procrastinating

Deciding that you need to start prepping for the GMAT in advance is one thing, but what most people end up doing is doing a little bit in the beginning and then procrastinating until it’s too late to go back. You don’t want to cram everything in the last 2 weeks: that’s not time-efficient and it won’t help you master the exam. Instead, you’ll just get more stressed and overwhelmed. In other words, try to keep the same pace throughout the whole 3-4 month period of your at-home GMAT prep in order to get the score you’re aiming for.

Stressing Way Too Much On Exam Day

It’s normal to worry about your scores as this exam can very well determine your future. However, worrying way too much can affect your performance on exam day. Instead, take your time to prepare and do your best when the time comes for you to take the GMAT, and you’ll be just fine. One extra step that you can take to help you manage the stress is visiting the test center before the exam. That way, you’ll get used to the journey and the place and you’ll also feel more relaxed if you know what to expect.  

Studying Instead Of Practicing

Another mistake students make is studying study guides instead of practicing extensively. Study guides can help you so much, but practicing on real exams is what will essentially put all that textbook knowledge into practice. So make sure to spend most of your time on actual practice, rather than focusing on learning concepts by heart.

Pro tip: Another way to help you accelerate learning is by working with a one-on-one GMAT instructor. The help of an expert can be beneficial, especially when you find that you are not making any progress with your prep or if you find yourself falling victim to any of the at-home prep mistakes listed above. These instructors know their way around the exam and will bring some structure to your at-home GMAT prep as they work around your schedule and will keep you focused on what’s important.

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Featured Video Play Icon
Posted on
01
Sep 2021

Additional Voters – GMAT Quant Problem

Additional Voters – GMAT Quant Problem

Hey guys, today we’re going to look at a particularly challenging GMAT Quant problem that just about everyone resorts to an algebraic solution path on, but there’s a very elegant part solution path. When we take a look at this problem we observe immediately that the difficulty is that we have no baseline for the number of voters that we start with. That’s the confusing part here and this is one of the ways that the GMAT modulates difficulty; when they give us a problem without fixed numbers, and where we’re not free to run a scenario because there are add-on numbers that change the relative values.

Additional Voters Problem Introduction

GMAT Quant Problem

Here they’re adding the 500 and the 600 which means there exist fixed values at the beginning, but we don’t know what they are. What we want to do here is remove ourselves a bit from the problem and let the ratios that they give us guide our way.

We start out with three parts Republicans, five parts Democrats. These eight parts constitute everything, but we don’t know how many voters are in each part – it could be one voter in each, or a hundred, or a thousand, and we can’t speculate yet. So, what we need to do is not worry about it, and this is where a lot of people get really uncomfortable. Let it go for a second, and notice that, after we add all the new voters, we end up with an extra part on the Republican side and the same number of parts on the Democrat side.

What does this mean? Well, the parts are obviously getting bigger from the before to the after. But because we have an overall equivalence between the number of parts we can actually reverse engineer the solution out of this.

Reverse Engineering the Solution

We’re adding 500 Democrats and we’re maintaining five parts from the before to the after. This means that each part is getting an extra 100 voters for the total of plus 500. On the Republican side, we’re adding 600 voters. We already know, from the Democratic side, that each part needs to increase by 100 to keep pace with all the other parts. So, 300 voters are used in the three republican parts, leaving 300 extra voters to constitute the entirety of the fourth part.

Now we know that each part after we add the voters equals 300 and therefore each part before we added the voters was 200. From there we get our answer choice. I forget what they were asking us at this point, and this is actually a really great moment because it’s very common on these complex problems to get so caught up, even if you’re doing it mentally, with a more conducive solution path, to forget what’s being asked. When you’re doing math on paper, which is something we really don’t recommend, it’s even easier to do so because you get so involved processing the numbers in front of you that you lose conceptual track of what the problem is about.

So, they’re asking for the difference between the Democratic and Republican voters after the voters are added. Now we know there’s one part difference and we know that after voters are added a part equals 300 voters so the answer choice is B, 300.

Something to Keep in Mind

This one is not easy to get your head around, but it’s easier than dealing with the mess of algebra that you’d otherwise have to do.
Review this one again. This is a GMAT Quant problem you may have to review several days in a row. It’s one where you might attain an understanding, and then when you revisit it four hours later or the next day, you lose it and you have to fight for it again. It’s in this process of dense contact and fighting that same fight over and over again that you will slowly internalize this way of looking at it, which is one that is unpracticed. The challenge in this problem isn’t that it’s so difficult. It’s that it utilizes solution pads and way of thinking that we weren’t taught in school and that is entirely unpracticed. So, much of what you see as less difficult on the GMAT is less difficult only because you’ve been practicing it in one form or another since you were eight years old. So, don’t worry if you have to review this again and I hope this was helpful.

Check out this link for another super challenging GMAT Quant problem.

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las vegas city - gmat location article
Posted on
31
Aug 2021

Taking the GMAT Exam in Las Vegas

Table of Contents:

  1. Who administers the GMAT test?
  2. What does the test center look like?
  3. Where are the test centers located?
  4. Test center holidays
  5. Top MBA programs in the area
  6. Tips
  7. Test Day FAQs

About ¾ of the way through your extensive GMAT prep you should begin to start planning your test day, including scheduling the test, preparing your trip to the test center, and even pre-visiting the test center so that you know exactly where it is. This guide is here to offer you all the required information related to taking the GMAT in Las Vegas

Who administers the GMAT test?

Pearson Professional Centers – administers the GMAT and EA exam on behalf of the GMAC. To find out more about the Pearson Professional test centers visit https://www.pearson.com/us/.

What does the test center look like?

The location will include individual testing areas for each test taker with a separation screen between each test-taker.

Where are the test centers in Las Vegas?

These are the top locations where test-takers generally had the best experience:

Pearson Professional Centers- NY (Herald Square)Herald Square - GMAT Test Center in Las Vegas

31 West 34th Street
Suite 1001
New York, New York 10001
United States
Phone: 212-967-0471

By car:

From Downtown Las Vegas (11 minutes):

  • Take N 6th St to Las Vegas Blvd N
  • Take Exit 76A, I-15 S, Exit 40, and Las Vegas Blvd S to Convention Center Dr in Winchester
  • Follow Convention Center Dr to your destination

Test-takers’ review:

This test center was rated 2.7 by Google reviewers. This location had mixed reviews. Some people had a great testing experience and thought the facility was clean and quiet, and the staff was friendly and polite. Some reviewers complained and the lighting in the test rooms being very dim so keep this in mind when selecting a testing center.

Pearson Professional Centers-Las Vegas (South) NVLas Vegas (South) NV - Test Center

5715 South Sandhill Road
Suite B
Las Vegas, Nevada 89120
United States

By car:

From Downtown Las Vegas (14 minutes):

  • Get on I-515 S/US-93 S/US-95 S from N 9th St and E Mesquite Ave
  • Follow I-515 S/US-93 S/US-95 S to E Tropicana Ave in Paradise. Take exit 68 from I-515 S/US-93 S/US-95 S
  • Follow E Tropicana Ave and S Sandhill Rd to your destination

Test-takers’ review:

This test center was rated 2.9 by Google reviewers. The reviewers generally had mixed feelings about their experience in this test center.

Test Center Holidays

The most popular times for GMAT preparation and test-taking are during the holiday seasons. Be mindful of dates that you will not be able to take the GMAT or EA at any of the test centers mentioned above. Pearson test centers are closed during the following dates:

  • 1 Jan – New Year’s Day 
  • 21 Mar – Human Rights Day
  • 10 Apr – Good Friday   
  • 13 Apr – Family Day
  • 27 Apr – Freedom Day 
  • 1 May – Workers’ Day
  • 16 Jun – Youth Day
  • 9 Aug – National Women’s Day
  • 10 Aug – Public Holiday
  • 24 Sep – Heritage Day
  • 16 Dec – Day of Reconciliation
  • 25 Dec – Christmas Day
  • 26 Dec – Day of Goodwill

Top MBA programs in Las Vegas 

  • Lee Business School- University of Nevada

Tips:

  • During the test there will not be complete silence – you will be able to hear noise from other test takers so it is best to prepare for this by studying for the exam in similar scenarios. This can prepare you for any distractions (such as coughing, sneezing, or computer clicking sounds) that might occur while taking your exam.
  • Try to spend some time actually prepping in the lobby of the test center weeks/days in advance of your exam date. Since the place will be familiar to you come test day this can help curb test anxiety should you have any.
  • Here is a helpful test day planning guide: Link to guide
  • Find a test day checklist here: link to checklist

Test Day FAQs

Here are the top 5 questions that clients ask us about exam day information:

  • Are you allowed to listen to music while taking the GMAT exam?

You are not allowed to listen to music while taking the GMAT exam and you are not allowed to wear earphones as well.

  • What should I do if I fall sick on the exam day?

If you do not feel well come exam day you will have to make the decision as to whether or not you can take the test and perform at your best. Most people will not be able to do this so it will be best to cancel it. If you do so on the day of the exam you will incur a loss of your full $250 exam fee. If you cancel the exam 7 days in advance you will be charged a penalty of $50. If it is the first time that you will sit the exam and you are up for sitting through a 4 hour test, this may be a good opportunity to experience the test as you have the ability to cancel the score right afterwards if you are unhappy with it. Ultimately, it is best to take the GMAT when you are feeling your best as this will result in your optimum test performance.

  • What can I bring with me to the test center?

You are allowed in the test center with the following:

  • GMAT approved identification
  • Appointment confirmation letter or email you received from Pearson VUE
  • Prescription eyeglasses
  • Light sweater or light non-outerwear jacket
  • Comfort items only if they were pre-approved as an accommodation received in advance

Any additional personal belongings that you bring with you such as your cell phone, bag, snacks, and earphones will need to be stored in one of the provided lockers. You may eat your snack during the breaks. Any cell phone use throughout the test time (including breaks) is prohibited.

The test center will provide you with everything that you need in order to take the test including scratch paper and a pencil.

  • Should I wear a mask during the exam?

At the test centers above they strongly recommend that you wear a face mask or some type of face-covering in the test center and for the duration of your test to protect yourself and others. Test centers do not provide face masks for candidates.

Please note that if you have any flu-like symptoms upon arrival at the test center, you may be requested to reschedule your exam for another time when you are in full health.

  • What can I expect at the test center?

A usual test center is typically quite small. Once you arrive you will have to provide the administrator with the relevant documents and while these are being processed you will be asked to wait in the waiting area. In this area, you can still access all your personal belongings up until you are called into the testing room.

Once in the room, you will be allocated an individual exam station where you will find a computer.

For any questions or comments please reach out to us at www.apexgmat.com.
To speak to an Apex instructor about your GMAT prep, schedule a call HERE.

Read more
GMAT Prep Best Practices
Posted on
26
Aug 2021

How Top Scorers Study for The GMAT

By: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Narek Petrosyan
Date: 26 August 2021

GMAT Prep Best Practices 

Whether you are still preparing to take your first GMAT exam or aiming to get a higher score than on your previous one, you need a certain routine or a study plan and a determination to invest your full capacity into diligent and dedicated hard work. The top MBA programs usually require a GMAT score of 650 or above. Spending your time and energy inefficiently or not investing in proper preparation, may significantly, if not completely, reduce the chances of pursuing your MBA aspirations. In this article, we will explore some of the effective methods you can integrate into your prep to get a GMAT 650 score or above.

The Fundamentals

Firstly, let’s settle the most fundamental requirements that you need to make sure are inherently engraved into your approach. Those are unshakable dedication, efficient time management, wise prioritization, hard work, and diligence. While some of these can be considered common sense, in the long run, many students usually get distracted and forget about those. More commonly, the accumulated stress from the GMAT prep can shatter the pillars that these students have once so proudly built to hold the weight. 

Figure Out Your Learning Style and Find a Fitting Resource

After you’ve set your MBA goals and feel determined to start preparing for the GMAT, it’s now time to figure out your learning style and find a resource that fits. Nowadays, there are far more resources available than ever before. As such, it can be quite overwhelming to make a detailed choice. One of the first questions you need to ask yourself is what is your current or potential score? If you haven’t taken a GMAT test yet, maybe you should first find resources that start with the basics. Alternatively, if you’re aiming to get your current score to the top, you may also consider taking a one on one GMAT tutoring course. There are a myriad of companies that offer private GMAT tutoring services both online and in-person. ApexGMAT, for example, is more focused on increasing your current score to a 700+. Once you’ve set your current level you can then start working on that and find the best method for your preparation, given the abundance of resources available.

Manage Your Time Efficiently

Another, not less of an important aspect you should consider is time management. How much time can you dedicate to your prep daily? Many Top MBA schools prefer a 700+ GMAT score, which, in turn, requires a minimum of 100 hours of productive study in total. The word productive is essential here, as it is sometimes rather easy to mistake your activity for achievement. It’s not the matter of how many hours you can sit in front of your desk with an open book, but how much of it you can absorb, understand, and actually prepare for during that time. Too little time devoted will never be enough, while too much study can cause severe stress, and in fact, the next day you may not remember half of what you’ve learned. So, be realistic and honest with yourself, find that sweet daily time slot when you can prepare for the GMAT having enough energy and no external distractions, be consistent, strategic, and habitual, and, overall, manage your time efficiently during the day, prioritizing your studies.

Focus on Weak Areas and Improving Your Strengths

Start with a diagnostic test to figure out areas that need improvement first. It would be especially helpful if you’re just starting, as it may let you understand your weaknesses and strengths, and therefore what route you should take further. It will also give you a picture of how the actual exam will look like quite early in your preparation creed. After you’ve identified your weak points, it’s time to address those. If you seem weak, for example, in the quantitative section, then it’s a good indicator that you should put much more focus on that. That being said, you should not neglect the sections and types of problems that you do well on. One of the reasons the GMAT is challenging is its time pressure. The more you can nourish your strengths, the better you’ll be able to deal with the time pressure. Not only that, the GMAT test is adaptive, so the further you go with the streak, the harder the questions will get.

Get Plenty of Sleep and Try to Reduce Stress

Lack of sufficient and healthy sleep is probably the number one obstacle standing in most students’ way of effective GMAT preparations and, consequently, top GMAT performance. Your sleep hygiene plays a key role in allowing the brain to absorb what’s been learned during the day, as well as preparing it for the prep of the arriving day. As such, one of the best practices the top scorers integrate into their preparation is a good 8 hours of sleep every night. In turn, not only will this benefit your GMAT prep, but also your overall and mental health. Even if it will take you away from GMAT exam studies, it’s still worth it. You can learn more about how sleep helps you improve your GMAT prep time in this youtube video.

Start and Plan Early

As for the final tips, there are a few things you can do to eliminate a huge portion of stress from your test preparation studies and, in fact, significantly contribute to your preparations. Firstly, make sure you start as early as possible. Just as soon as you decide on your MBA goals, if possible, start figuring out your study plan immediately. Even if it may seem that there’s no need to rush just yet, in the long run, it will prove worthy and will increasingly boost your confidence before your exam day. Secondly, plan on the date early. Test centers may just have very limited spaces, and if you won’t be able to reserve your desired date, it may become a heavy burden. And lastly, make sure you don’t overwhelm yourself the day before your GMAT exam. Grant yourself a good resting day in a calm, positive, and stressless environment.

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Which MBA Programs Are Right For Me?
Posted on
24
Aug 2021

Which MBA Programs Are Right For Me?

By: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Dana Coggio
Date: 24 August 2021

Having completed your bachelor’s degree and probably several years of work experience, you’ve decided that you’re ready to go back to school for your MBA. You now have another decision to make: How do you decide where to apply? Which MBA programs are the right ones for you? Which ones are likely to want to admit you?

This is probably one of the most important decisions you will have to make, and you want to be sure that you’re setting your sights on the best options for you. Before you can decide what you need from an MBA program, you have to do some self-assessment and take a realistic look at your profile. Taking the time now to look long and hard at your qualifications will save you time, money, and heartache in the long run. You will be able to see if your dream school is an achievable goal, or really just a pipedream. You will identify the schools that are looking for students with your qualifications, and you may even discover that your perfect MBA program is one that you never even considered.

 Here are the elements of your profile that you need to evaluate:

1- Employment history and work experience

This includes such factors as the industry you worked in as well as the company and position you held, how your accomplishments compared to your peers, how fast/far you have advanced, and how much of an impact you have had, whether in formal or informal leadership roles. You will also need to assess any gaps in your employment history, the reasons for them and how you filled them. Perhaps you took an unpaid internship for the experience or maybe used the time to volunteer, pick up new skills, or explore your extracurricular interests.

Evaluate your strengths as well as your weaknesses or challenges. Strengths can be fulfilling a unique role in your industry, extraordinary advancement, or exceptional leadership. Challenges could include working in a slow-growing company with increasing responsibility but little possibility for promotion, having to compete with and stand out among other ambitious colleagues who are also your teammates, or dealing with high-stress situations. The way you meet with and frame your challenges can often showcase your greatest strengths. 

2- Academic Stats

Included in this element are your undergrad and grad (if applicable) GPA and transcripts, and test scores. Evaluate your strengths and weaknesses in each of these areas to find your total stats picture. But don’t just look at the numbers, look at the trends. Do you have a weak GPA and a strong, balanced GMAT? Did your GPA go up as you progressed through college and is your GMAT quant score over the eightieth percentile? This record will take you further than a GPA that started out as a 4.0 but trended down and is combined with a GMAT quant score around the sixtieth percentile. The same final results take on a new meaning when you look at the trends. If your GPA is on the lower side – and especially if there was a downward trend even with a strong GMAT – it’s a good idea to take additional classes, and ace them. The recent As will help allay any doubts concerning your academic record.

3- Post-MBA Goals

Think about the following when considering your goals after B-school:

  •   What is your current industry and function? Where do you see yourself after your MBA?
  •   Are you hoping to make a major career change or a smaller career move once you have your MBA?
  •   How does your present position connect to your post-MBA goals?
  •   If you want to make a major career change, what do you need to do, besides getting your MBA, to make your new career a reality?
  •   What elements in an MBA program will launch you on the trajectory toward achieving your post-MBA goals? 

    4- Extracurricular Activities

    How you spend your time outside of work/school can say a lot about you, and can make you stand out from other MBA applicants. Some programs put more emphasis on these activities than others, and how much weight they carry will depend on other factors in your application. Extracurriculars are great ways to get leadership experience or help fill in gaps you might have in your work experience. They also can demonstrate your commitment, add a personal dimension to your application, and show application readers how you will contribute to the school’s community.

5- Other issues to consider 

Military service, volunteer experience, and any awards or recognition you have received are worthy additions to your profile. But you may need to include parts of your past that you’re not so proud of, that are negatives. Perhaps you’ve been placed on academic probation, had an honor code infraction, or received a DUI. How such issues are viewed can vary across different programs. Remember that all your experiences make up who you are, and even negatives can be positive indicators of how you cope with adversity, motivate yourself after a setback, and propel yourself forward. They can show your resilience as well as your ability to learn and grow from mistakes. A frank appraisal of your ups and downs, including taking responsibility for missteps, can actually make you a more attractive candidate.

An honest self-assessment is a key component of a successful application. Our experienced professional MBA admissions consultants will work with you one-on-one to assess and hone your personal profile so that you apply not only to the programs you really want but also to the programs likely to want you. Then we guide you in presenting your qualifications and story compellingly. Let us help you get on the road to being ACCEPTED!

Read more
Posted on
19
Aug 2021

Taking the GMAT Exam in San Francisco

Table of Contents:

  1. Who administers the GMAT test?
  2. What does the test center look like?
  3. Where are the test centers located?
  4. Test center holidays
  5. Top MBA programs in the area
  6. Tips
  7. Test Day FAQs

About ¾ of the way through your extensive GMAT prep you should begin to start planning your test day, including scheduling the test, preparing your trip to the test center, and even pre-visiting the test center so that you know exactly where it is. This guide is here to offer you all the required information related to taking the GMAT in San Francisco

Who administers the GMAT test?

Pearson Professional Centers – administers the GMAT and EA exam on behalf of the GMAC. To find out more about the Pearson Professional test centers visit https://www.pearson.com/us/.

What does the test center look like?

The location will include individual testing areas for each test taker with a separation screen between each test-taker.

Where are the test centers in San Francisco?

These are the top locations where test-takers generally had the best experience:

Pearson Professional Centers-San Francisco

Test Center in San Francisco

201 California Street
Suite 1400
San Francisco, California 94111
United States

By car:

From Downtown San Francisco (10 minutes):

  • Head south on Hyde St toward McAllister St
  • Turn right at the 1st cross street onto McAllister St
  • Continue on Van Ness Ave to Sansome St
  • Follow Sansome St to Filbert St
Test-takers’ review:

This test center was rated 3.2 by Google reviewers. The test-takers generally gave mixed reviews when describing this particular test center. Some had a great test-taking experience and regarded the staff as professional and helpful. Others did not, as they mentioned that the front desk personnel was rude and the pens they provided did not work properly.

Test Center Holidays

The most popular times for GMAT preparation and test-taking are during the holiday seasons. Be mindful of dates that you will not be able to take the GMAT or EA at any of the test centers mentioned above. Pearson test centers are closed during the following dates:

  • 1 Jan – New Year’s Day 
  • 21 Mar – Human Rights Day
  • 10 Apr – Good Friday   
  • 13 Apr – Family Day
  • 27 Apr – Freedom Day 
  • 1 May – Workers’ Day
  • 16 Jun – Youth Day
  • 9 Aug – National Women’s Day
  • 10 Aug – Public Holiday
  • 24 Sep – Heritage Day
  • 16 Dec – Day of Reconciliation
  • 25 Dec – Christmas Day
  • 26 Dec – Day of Goodwill

Top MBA programs in San Francisco 

  • HAAS School of Business
  • Stanford Graduate School of Business

Tips:

  • During the test there will not be complete silence – you will be able to hear noise from other test takers so it is best to prepare for this by studying for the exam in similar scenarios. This can prepare you for any distractions (such as coughing, sneezing, or computer clicking sounds) that might occur while taking your exam.
  • Try to spend some time actually prepping in the lobby of the test center weeks/days in advance of your exam date. Since the place will be familiar to you come test day this can help curb test anxiety should you have any.
  • Here is a helpful test day planning guide: Link to guide
  • Find a test day checklist here: link to checklist

Test Day FAQs

Here are the top 5 questions that clients ask us about exam day information:

  • Are you allowed to listen to music while taking the GMAT exam?

You are not allowed to listen to music while taking the GMAT exam and you are not allowed to wear earphones as well.

  • What should I do if I fall sick on the exam day?

If you do not feel well come exam day you will have to make the decision as to whether or not you can take the test and perform at your best. Most people will not be able to do this so it will be best to cancel it. If you do so on the day of the exam you will incur a loss of your full $250 exam fee. If you cancel the exam 7 days in advance you will be charged a penalty of $50. If it is the first time that you will sit the exam and you are up for sitting through a 4 hour test, this may be a good opportunity to experience the test as you have the ability to cancel the score right afterwards if you are unhappy with it. Ultimately, it is best to take the GMAT when you are feeling your best as this will result in your optimum test performance.

  • What can I bring with me to the test center?

You are allowed in the test center with the following:

  • GMAT approved identification
  • Appointment confirmation letter or email you received from Pearson VUE
  • Prescription eyeglasses
  • Light sweater or light non-outerwear jacket
  • Comfort items only if they were pre-approved as an accommodation received in advance

Any additional personal belongings that you bring with you such as your cell phone, bag, snacks, and earphones will need to be stored in one of the provided lockers. You may eat your snack during the breaks. Any cell phone use throughout the test time (including breaks) is prohibited.

The test center will provide you with everything that you need in order to take the test including scratch paper and a pencil.

  • Should I wear a mask during the exam?

At the test centers above they strongly recommend that you wear a face mask or some type of face-covering in the test center and for the duration of your test to protect yourself and others. Test centers do not provide face masks for candidates.

Please note that if you have any flu-like symptoms upon arrival at the test center, you may be requested to reschedule your exam for another time when you are in full health.

  • What can I expect at the test center?

A usual test center is typically quite small. Once you arrive you will have to provide the administrator with the relevant documents and while these are being processed you will be asked to wait in the waiting area. In this area, you can still access all your personal belongings up until you are called into the testing room.

Once in the room, you will be allocated an individual exam station where you will find a computer.

For any questions or comments please reach out to us at www.apexgmat.com.
To speak to an Apex instructor about your GMAT prep, schedule a call HERE.

Read more