Posted on
05
Jul 2022

Overcoming Focus Issues on the GMAT

We are sure that there have been occasions when you were ready to study but found yourself thinking about everything else besides what you were supposed to do. Lack of focus is a common problem that each of us has to face and find a way to deal with. GMAT is an examination that requires a lot of concentration as you have to shift from one topic to another for 3 and half hours. Maintaining your focus is not a suggestion but a necessity while preparing for and taking the exam. In this article, we are going to look at some useful tips on how to deal with the lack of focus for the GMAT.

Set Proper Studying Environment

Most of us have a preferred studying environment that is tailored to our needs and requirements and ensures personal comfort. For some of us, this may be studying on the bed with the music on and snacks, and for others, studying in a group with friends at a cafe. However, on exam day, you won’t have these “luxuries.” Instead you will be required to sit at a bare desk for more than 3 hours. Not having your conveniences may affect your concentration negatively and consequently, deteriorate your GMAT performance. 

One way to avoid this is to prepare yourself at home for the exam in similar conditions to the ones on the exam day itself. For example, instead of studying on your bed, choose a chair and table set up. You should also try to minimize your distractions as much as possible- turn off the music, leave your phone away, don’t let people come into the room where you are studying, etc. The more similar your studying environment is to the exam environment, the higher your chances are to be focused and work well when taking the GMAT exam.

Create Your Personalized Study Plan for GMAT Preparation

The key to a successful GMAT performance is efficient preparation, which follows a well-organized study plan with clear timetables and goals. If you plan to take the GMAT, start your preparation by creating a study plan. You may use an online planner tool or even better, talk with a professional who can help you to develop a study strategy for your prep schedule.  

Having a GMAT prep schedule can also help you on the exam day itself. Once you have it, you can put time limits for each section of the exam and determine whether it takes you too long to finish a particular question or section. This could be a sign that you aren’t focused on the exam and that you have to quickly overcome the distractions. If you learn the signs of being distracted, you can practice overcoming your lack of focus on the GMAT. 

Set Up a Routine

Besides having a study plan or prep schedule, you may want to consider creating a day-to-day schedule or routine and organizing your tasks. Sometimes it can be overwhelming to balance between work, studying for the GMAT, social life, and all other responsibilities. This often leads to an irregular schedule of studying, which works against the quality of study time. Your body follows a biological clock, meaning your mind functions best or to its full capacity at particular periods of the day. If you don’t set certain times to study, you can often find yourself more easily distracted and lose your focus for the GMAT by thinking of everything else you have to do during the day.

If you want to utilize your time effectively and study better, create a routine, organize your tasks, and give yourself time to relax. You have to devote a sufficient amount of time for your preparation, separate from your personal or professional commitments’ time. Importantly, you should also give yourself time to rest and procrastinate freely so as not to lose your sanity while preparing for GMAT. Go for a walk, take a nap or watch your favorite series. 

Additional Tip 

Study in bursts. Don’t force yourself to study for 4 hours straight. This won’t be a productive learning session as you and your brain have a limit to how much new knowledge you can handle. Instead, try dividing your study time into 20-25 min chunks, interspersed with 5 min breaks. When you are engaged with intense mental activities such as studying or preparing for the GMAT exam, it is critical to take breaks. This method can help you stay focused since you know that the next break is just around the corner, so you have to get motivated, roll up your sleeves and finish your task.

Conclusion

Preparing for and taking the GMAT exam is a challenging endeavor and maintaining your focus is an essential requirement for success. You should find your own ways to stay focused and create a study plan that is suitable for you and your needs. Here at Apex, we are more than happy to support you on your GMAT journey and assist you in every step of the process. You can sign-up for a 30-minute complimentary consultation call with one of our instructors who can help you develop your personalized GMAT prep schedule!

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Posted on
29
Jun 2022

GMAT vs LSAT

Deciding to do a master’s degree is not easy for anyone. Actually, it is a pretty daunting and lengthy process to achieve one. If you’re reading this, chances are you are considering the process. This article compares two of the most common standardized tests — the GMAT and the LSAT. 

Firstly, let’s do a short breakdown analysis of each of the exams. 

The GMAT

The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is a post-graduate entrance exam for those who wish to do an MBA. The test consists of four sections and takes about three hours to complete. The score ranges from 200-800.

Most of the best business schools require a high score on the GMAT. For example, to be able to get into a prestigious business school, it is best to score a 700+. 

The LSAT

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is also a post-graduate entrance exam but specifically made for law school. The LSAT is the only way that you can be admitted to a law school and pursue a degree in it. 

The LSAT has three sections and lasts for three and a half hours. The score for the LSAT ranges from 120 to 180, and most top law schools prefer scores over 170.

The Differences and Similarities of the GMAT and LSAT 

The GMAT includes problem-solving, decision-making, and analytical questions. It tests skills which you will need during your MBA. On the other hand, the LSAT will test you more on reasoning, logic, reading, and writing – great skills needed for future lawyers!  

Both the GMAT and the LSAT have a section on reading comprehension that has more or less similar types of questions. Reading Comprehension is the most basic section for all standardized tests. On top of that, both have analytical and writing sections. The writing section is a single essay in both of the exams that require the test taker to write on a certain topic. The other sections of both tests differ.

As mentioned before, the GMAT is more heavily based on analytical and problem-solving questions, meaning that it also contains a lot of math in its questions. The LSAT, on the other hand, does not include any math. The exam mainly tests the test-takers’ reasoning and verbal skills. However, LSAT does have a section called “Analytical Reasoning” which may feel like math because it is based on logic. The LSAT has a verbal section called “Logical Reasoning Questions” which is similar to GMAT’s “Critical Reasoning” section. The latter is seemingly more difficult.

The differences in the sections are timing and demand. The LSAT is said to have more arguments that specifically want to test your ability. The GMAT, on the other hand, adapts to your performance during the exam and continues the questionnaire that way. The GMAT is more focused on testing quantitative and qualitative skills which are essential for effective functioning in the business world. In comparison, the LSAT has more reading and writing sections since law school is a heavily qualitative field which requires extensive reading and interpreting.  

Conclusion

In conclusion, you should first try to understand which degree sounds more suitable and enjoyable to you so that you go into it wholeheartedly. Other than that, it is helpful to know that both the GMAT and the LSAT have similarities in their sections and both of them are post-graduate entrance exams that are a requirement to get into any business or law school.

Contributor: Sarin Sulahian

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Posted on
28
Jun 2022

3 Most Common GMAT Mistakes Made During the Exam

The GMAT is a unique type of exam that tests a broad area of knowledge as well as various skills such as time management, working well under pressure, and strategy building. You will be given a relatively short amount of time to answer each question, and you need to be well aware of how you should approach each type of question. You may already feel that many things can go wrong during the exam. While it is normal to make mistakes, being prepared for the exam by knowing  potential exam “traps” will help you deal with any unexpected situations. One of the best ways to prepare for such situations is by learning from others’ mistakes. Thus, we’re going to walk you through some of the most common GMAT mistakes that test-takers make during the exam and give our advice on how to avoid them.

1. Memorized Answers 

A common GMAT mistake that test takers make while preparing for the exam is memorizing the questions and answers from the practice exams rather than understanding and learning from each question. This strategy is pretty useless as the same exact questions from the practice tests will NOT  repeat on the official GMAT exam. Also, this strategy is prone to causing real problems to test takers during the exam since they (most probably) will have a limited array of techniques to use to tackle different question types. 

Keep in mind that you have about 2 min per question. Because of this you should have a strategy and logical method of tackling and solving each question type before the exam takes place. During your GMAT preparation, you should understand the question types and what you are required to do on each of them. The questions from each section have aspects to them which can be tricky to understand at the beginning. If you find yourself struggling to understand  questions and solution paths you can always look for professional help. For example, private GMAT tutors are people who have extensive experience when it comes to taking – and studying for – the GMAT. A proper private GMAT tutor can give you valuable advice on how to avoid common mistakes on the different GMAT sections.

2. Wrong Time Strategy

As the GMAT is a time-constrained exam, having the right time strategy is crucial during the exam. Knowing that they are pressed for time, many students tend to allocate their time wrongly which negatively affects their performance. Having a short amount of time to answer each question means it may be tempting to look for shortcuts to save time. For example, many students try to save some extra time by scanning questions in order to get a rough understanding of what is being asked. In this way, they believe they will have more time to analyze the option choices and  find the right answer faster. Unfortunately, this strategy rarely yields the expected results because students get stuck between 2-3 choices, meaning they will have to re-read the question. Hence, answering just one question will take more time than they had anticipated. 

The remedy for this common GMAT mistake is a combination of a proper timing strategy and a proper approach for solving different types of questions. Instead of looking for ways to solve the question for the least possible time and compromising the accuracy of your answer, try to find the right approach to solve the question. Having the right approach means that you will spend just the right amount of time. While preparing for the GMAT exam, pay enough attention to problem solving methods as well as the time you take to solve each question. 

3. Refusing to Admit You Don’t Know Something

Another common GMAT mistake hides in the students’ inability to admit that they don’t know the answer to a particular question. Instead they attempt to guess the answer. This is, of course, an action of last resort. Nevertheless, it’s naive to think that even if you have studied for hundreds of hours, you will know the answer to every question. Keep in mind, the GMAT exam is not designed for you to answer every single question right. The GMAT test has a computerized adaptive format, meaning it employs a special algorithm to adjust to your level of proficiency as you progress through the questions. It will give you several easy, intermediate, and hard questions, and you have to try to give an answer to all of them.

Instead of agonizing over a few questions and wasting valuable time trying to solve them, you have to take your best educated guess and move on. Otherwise, you are losing your chance of getting other questions correct. It is far more important to get through the entire exam rather than to answer every question correctly. Your score will be calculated collectively from all questions and it won’t be determined only by the questions that you don’t know. Show what you have learned and don’t worry if you can’t answer all the questions.

Conclusion

The GMAT is a challenging exam because it hides many potential traps that can easily mislead test-takers who, under pressure, often make careless mistakes. You should understand that making mistakes is normal and be prepared to make some yourself. Here at Apex, we are more than happy to support you on your GMAT journey and assist you in every step of the process. You can sign-up for a 30-minute complimentary consultation call with one of our instructors who can help you ace your exam and learn strategies to avoid GMAT mistakes!

 

Contributor: Diana Materova

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Posted on
22
Jun 2022

5 Tips to Consider 1 Week Before the EA Exam

Taking any kind of exam comes with some sort of fear and anxiety which is totally natural. You will have certain kinds of tensions, such as the fear of the exam not going well, especially when it’s your first time taking a specific exam. If you have 1 week left before the EA exam, then you are in safe hands, as this article introduces you to 5 useful EA exam tips that will help you overcome the fear and ace the test. 

1. Take Practice Tests

You are all prepared and have 1 week left to take the EA exam. With all the preparation, do you still fear the exam? The most possible way to fight your fear is to practice. Go for the EA practice test. Keep practicing as it is said that practice makes perfect. In a research done by John A. Tures, it has been shown that those who take the practice test outperform those who do not by an average of approximately 15 percentage points. You don’t want to lose that 15%. The practice tests do not give you the exact questions included in the actual exam, but they surely introduce you to the format of the questions. They give you a clue on how the questions might be. Plus, experience also eliminates fear. If you keep practicing, you get to experience the whole exam procedure which diminishes your fear and levels up your confidence on the actual day of the exam. But try not to overuse the practice exams because you don’t want to overwhelm yourself. 

2. Work on Your Time Management Skills

It is much more likely to lose the track of time during the exam. Sometimes we get so obsessed with finding a solution for one question that we forget other questions which have higher points. This stubbornness is not of any help. So, it is important to try to devote a fair amount of time for each of the questions. To this end, you need to manage your time. So, the 1 week that you have is more than enough for you to improve your time management. This could help you to have an idea about the amount of time you need for each question that appears on the EA exam. Overall, there are 40 questions and you are given 90 minutes to solve them. It means that you have 2.25 minutes for each question. During this 1 week, adapt yourself to this timing. Of course, you can have your preference to set the timing based on your knowledge of the three parts. You might want to spend more of your time on one part of the test than on the other. Knowing the level of your knowledge that you have about each part of the exam helps you not lose the track of time. Set a timer and keep practicing to manage your time. 

3. Familiarize Yourself With the Exam

Sometimes not having enough information about the structure of an exam itself is a factor of anxiety or fear so make sure you know everything about the exam. Plus, having information about the exam in handy saves you from all those ‘I didn’t know this’ moments. Digging into some research a week before your EA exam will make you feel more confident and aware. Here is everything you need to know about the EA exam. 

4. Learn From Others’ Mistakes

There is a saying “Don’t go to the doctor, but go to the one who has experienced.”  Those who know everything about the exam (such as the test centers) still know less than those who have experienced taking the exam. Therefore, search for those who have already taken the EA exam. Learn from their mistakes. Consider the tips they offer. Ask them to share their experience with you and what they wished they had done differently. Another option could be reading the testimonials on our website where the students write about their experiences. They give an insight on how to get prepare for the exam especially when you like to be tutored individually. 

5. Feed Your Brain

You don’t want to go to the exam without fully charging your brain. Along with your hands, you will be using your brain the most during the exam so make sure you feed your brain well. Make a good schedule for your sleep as it improves your brain performance. Plus, the Healthline website introduces us to the nine foods (berries, citrus fruits, dark chocolates, nuts, eggs, avocados, fish, beets, red/green/orange vegetables) you need to take to make your brain ready for an exam. If the exam is a battle for you then your brain will be your only weapon. Make sure you reload this weapon. 

 

If you consider all these tips a week before your exam, you will feel much better and readier about the important day that’s coming up. Just don’t demoralize yourself with fear, but rather boost up your confidence by following the above mentioned tips. 

Good luck on your test!

Contributor: Zuhal Qaderdan

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Posted on
06
Jun 2022

GMAT In-Person or Online? Pros and Cons

As you consider your options for taking the GMAT, you probably have considered the question “Which one would work better for me: GMAT in person or GMAT online?” The GMAC has recently announced changes to the GMAT exam, including giving test takers the option to take the exam online.

Which is better for you, GMAT in person or GMAT online? There are pros and cons to both, and it ultimately depends on your personal preference and situation. Here are some key factors to consider when making your decision.

Pros of Taking the GMAT Online 

Flexibility

The best part about taking the GMAT online is that you can take the test from any place that has an internet connection. This is a major plus for people who cannot travel or do not live near a physical GMAT testing center. Also, the online format allows more flexibility in terms of scheduling. You can choose to take the exam at any time that works for you as long as you comply with certain time frames.

Taking the Test in the Same Environment You Studied in 

If you are taking the GMAT exam at home, the setting will be similar to the one you studied and practiced in for this test. Taking the exam in an environment that’s already familiar to you means that your mind will be more comfortable with its surroundings which can reduce anxiety. Studying for the GMAT and taking the exam in the same place will help your mind connect the material you studied with the setting in which you’re taking the test.

Test Anxiety 

For some test takers, the thought of taking a test in person can be very anxiety-provoking. If you are one of these people, then taking the GMAT online may be a better option for you. You can take the GMAT from the comfort of your own home and avoid any potential stress that comes with being in a physical testing location.

Cons of Taking the GMAT Online 

Less Personal Attention

When you take the GMAT online, you do not have direct contact with a proctor. You both will be able to communicate through the chat, and you can ring to live chat with the proctor. Still, this can be a disadvantage if you prefer receiving more personal attention or want your questions to be answered faster, in more detail, or prefer face-to-face explanation. 

Security

Some people may feel less secure about taking an online test, especially if they haven’t taken any online exams before. Make sure you are familiar with the GMAC security procedures for online testing before signing up and the steps you need to complete before starting the exam.

No Scratch Papers  

One thing you cannot do when taking the GMAT online is to take notes physically. But you do have the virtual whiteboard or you can buy your own whiteboard to use during the exam. This can be a disadvantage if you like to have physical copies of all your materials in front of you during the test. Also, proctors are very strict when it comes to what you have around you. You are not allowed to have anything on your table, including pens, calculators, or coffee. Literally, nothing should be around you.

Pros of taking the GMAT in Person  

Environmental Distractions are Eliminated  

If you are someone who is easily distracted by your surroundings, then taking the GMAT in person may be a better choice for you. This setting allows you to have more control and eliminates any potential environmental distractions. You don’t know when you might receive an unexpected mail or notifications on your laptop.

Live Feedback from the Proctor 

Another advantage of taking the GMAT in person is that you can get live feedback from the proctor. If you have any questions or concerns during the test, the proctor can help to address them faster and maybe better than through a chat box online. 

Cons of Taking the GMAT in Person  

Location and Scheduling

The main disadvantage of taking the GMAT in person is that you are limited to location and schedule. You may not be able to find a test center close to you, or the testing times may not work with your schedule.

Cost

The GMAT costs $250, and the cost of taking it in person can add up if you have to travel.

Similarities: GMATin Person or GMAT Online  

Both the online and in-person versions of the GMAT are computerized, so you will get the same questions and experience. Also, both GMAT online and in person will be 3 hours and 7 minutes and you will be given two optional 8-minute breaks, plus you will be able to choose the sequence in which you take the test. Both exams cost US $275. So if you are concerned about potential errors that could occur in a live test environment, rest assured that GMAT in-person and online are equally accurate.

Technology Requirements for the GMAT Online  

In order to take the GMAT online, you must meet certain technical requirements. You will need either a PC or Mac that operates on Windows 8.1 or 10 or Mac OS 10 or above, Windows 7 will not work. You need to have a computer with internet access, a webcam, and a microphone. If you do not have these items or are unable to meet the requirements, you will have to take the GMAT in person.

Which Option is Best for You  

Ultimately, the decision of whether to take the GMAT in person or online comes down to personal preference. If you are comfortable with technology and don’t have a flexible schedule, then the GMAT online option may be better for you. However, if you prefer more personal interaction or want feedback from a proctor, then the GMAT in person option is best. Keep in mind that you always have the option to hire a GMAT private tutor to help guide you with your studies and everything related to the GMAT. No matter which format you choose, make sure to prepare well so that you can score your best on test day.

Contributor: Cynthia Addoumieh

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Posted on
01
Jun 2022

GMAT Success: How to Utilize Breaks During the GMAT

One of the most ignored parts when thinking about the GMAT is taking a break during the test itself. Most standardized tests from the SAT to the Multi-State Bar Exam offer the test-takers the option to take breaks. The GMAT does the same. Constantly we harp over GMAT testing strategies and different study methods for our GMAT Success and we put a massive amount of emphasis on the test day itself. But we never seem to mention the breaks that can be taken during the GMAT.

1. How Long is the GMAT?

You are probably well aware of the structure of the GMAT at this point, but here is a reminder anyway. The GMAT is a grueling 3 hours and 7 minutes and is divided into four sections, integrated, quantitative, and verbal reasoning, along with the analytical writing assessment. The verbal and quantitative sections are especially a pain, with both being over an hour and filled with highly demanding questions.

1.Integrated Reasoning: 30 mins, 12 questions 

2.Quantitative Reasoning: 62 mins, 31 questions 

3.Verbal Reasoning:  65 questions, 36 questions 

4.Analytical Writing Assignment: 30 mins, 1 question

During the GMAT exam, you are allowed two eight-minute breaks. The first is allowed after the first hour of the exam and the second is available after the quantitative reasoning portion. Both of these breaks are completely optional, but taking full advantage of these breaks can really help keep you sane during the GMAT. 

So why should you be taking these breaks and what should you do? Below are some of our favorite suggestions when utilizing the breaks during the GMAT.

2. Importance of Taking a Break 

The GMAT breaks are optional, and you may be someone who prefers not to do so. But just keep in mind that the GMAT is over 3 hours long so it is a marathon, not a sprint. These GMAT breaks can help maximize your scoring potential. However, when taking a break do not study during it, in fact, if you study during the break your score could actually be cancelled. That’s because studying during the test time is against the rules of the GMAT. Instead, actually use your break to take a break.

3. Reduce Stress

Stress while studying for and taking the GMAT is universal and it’s not unjustified – the GMAT is an exam that could help determine your future. So of course it makes sense that many can find themselves overwhelmed during the exam. Taking a break is a great way to reset and achieve GMAT success. Even if you don’t feel completely overwhelmed, stepping away from the test is a good way to gain clarity. Taking breaks help you to broth process and retain information, further maintaining your focus. It is easy to become exhausted during the exam and for your brain to be drained.  Hence, even if you may not feel you need a break your brain probably needs one. 

4. Refuel 

Of course when taking a break during the GMAT you have a chance to eat or drink something. Something that you can prepare for yourself are healthy snacks. Fruit, granola bars, or nuts can serve as great ways to power your brain through the rest of the exam. In fact, we would recommend that the night and morning before the exam to make sure to eat something healthy. Stay away from unhealthy snacks and food as you want both your body and brain to be in the best shape for the test. In terms of drinks, water, but also maybe a thermos filled with coffee and tea will suit you well. A cup of coffee may even give you that boost you need. Once again we suggest you stay away from unhealthy drinks such as sodas and energy drinks. 

In Review 

GMAT success is a monumental task. It is a very demanding test, both in prep and during the exam itself. It is important to try and take advantage of every opportunity you can get, such as breaks during the test. Here at Apex GMAT we offer a different edge on the GMAT, that being private one on one GMAT tutoring. Private GMAT tutoring give test takers some of the best opportunities in achieving GMAT success. Apex GMAT  offers both online and in-person tutoring. It can be the first step to your desired GMAT score.

 

Contributor: Lucas Duncan

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EA Score
Posted on
18
May 2022

EA Score: How Is The Executive Assessment Scored?

You have already taken, or are planning on taking your Executive Assessment (EA), but you do not quite understand how your EA score will be calculated or assessed. Knowing how your exam will be evaluated and corrected can help you in dividing your time during your exam more efficiently and can also help in the way you plan to approach the exam. You most likely have quite the number of questions that you would like to get the answers to. Well, in this article, we will be breaking down the EA’s scoring method.

What will be discussed is the following; 

  • The EA exam
  • The EA scores
  • The EA score calculation
  • The EA percentiles
  • A list of some of the B-Schools accepting EA scores

1. Back to the Basics

Back in March 2016, the Executive Assessment was announced by GMAC, the creators of the official GMAT exam. The EA was designed to serve professionals who aim to enroll in Executive MBA programs. The test was built to be finished in only 90 minutes, and unlike the GMAT, requires little to no prepping. 

The EA is an assessment to evaluate a candidate’s readiness. That means that the score received is not a tool used to compare all the applicants, rather it is used to see if the candidates are capable of handling the programs they applied for.

If you are a busy professional looking for a way to showcase your EMBA readiness to the admission officers without the stress of preparing for the GMAT, then the EA is just the exam for you.

The EA is divided into three different sections, which are, Integrated Reasoning, Verbal Reasoning, and Quantitative Reasoning

Each of its sections aims to test different skills hidden in its takers. But to get the bigger picture, the whole exam is there to measure skills that are needed in a fulfilling career, as well as, in the Business Programs. These skills include critical thinking, the ability of deep analysis, problem solving, and higher order reasoning. 

There are a total of 40 questions to finish in exactly 90 minutes, as mentioned prior in this article. For a more detailed distribution about that matter, take a look at this table below:

Sections Number of Questions Timing
Integrated Reasoning 12 30 minutes
Verbal Reasoning 14 30 minutes
Quantitative Reasoning  14 30 minutes

2. EA Score

Starting with the picture as a whole, the Executive Assessment has a total score ranging from 100 to 200, with a minimum score of 126, and a maximum of 174, leaving a score of 150 as the midpoint score. 

The three sections making up the EA exam all have equal distribution when it comes to their scoring. The three sections’ scores range on a scale of 0 to 20. 

Something great about the EA is that there is no “passing” or “good” EA score, what matters is your score and all the other factors in your application that make the admission’s decision. But, of course, the higher your total EA score, the better – especially if you are considering a competitive EMBA program

However, for most EMBA programs, their consideration of a “good’’ or “ideal” score would be one equal to 150 (the midpoint score) or above.

3. EA Score Calculation

Your total EA score is the summation of the scores you got on all three different sections, plus 120. Let’s suppose you scored 15 on each section, your score would be: 15 + 15 + 15 + 120 = 165. So, that is the scores of all the three different sections on your EA plus 120. If that was really the case, then you would have scored within the 98th percentile. 

4. EA Percentiles 

Speaking of percentiles, here is all you need to know when it comes to this subject. Percentiles are like rankings that identify where you stand in comparison to the other EA test takers. The higher your total score, the higher the percentile rate, and vice versa. 

Taking the example from above, if you scored 165 in total, that means you are in the 98th percentile. That also means that you were from the rare 2% of all the test takers that scored that specific score and that 98% of the test takers scored lower than your score. 

Here are the Officially published Executive Assessment Percentiles 2021:

    • 0th Percentile: 126 (the lowest score)
    • 10th Percentile: 141 
    • 25th Percentile: 146
  • 40th Percentile: 148
    • 50th Percentile: 150 (the midpoint score) 
    • 75th Percentile: 153
  • 86th Percentile: 156
  • 99th Percentile: 174 (the highest score) 

5. A List of Some of the Schools Accepting EA Scoring

Schools in America: 

Schools in Europe: 

Schools in Asia:

Moral of the Story

To make a long story short, the EA is known to be the perfect exam for busy professionals that do not have the time needed for all the hassle that comes along with the GMAT prep journey. It is an identification of your readiness and your ability to handle the program you applied to. 

If you are looking for professional help to boost your EA performance, head to our official website and book your 30 minutes complimentary assessment session now!

Contributor: Lilas AL-Sammak

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EA Exam 2022
Posted on
04
May 2022

EA Exam 2022 – Everything You Need To Know In 5 Minutes

Table of Contents

  • About the EA Exam
    • What is EA used for?
  • EA Structure, Sections, Timing, & Scoring
    • EA Scoring & Validity
    • What is a Good Score?
  • How, When, & Where can I take the EA? 
    • EA Exam Day FAQs
  • How Much Does The EA Exam Cost?
    • Rescheduling & Cancellation of your EA appointment
    • Additional Costs Worth Considering 
  • EA History & Background
    • EA Changes Over Years
    • Online EA Test in the face of COVID-19

About The EA Exam

The Executive Assessment (EA) is considered a trusted predictor of business school readiness for busy professionals wishing to earn an MBA or EMBA. The exam is crafted and administered by the General Management Admissions Council (GMAC) to measure a candidate’s higher order reasoning, critical thinking, analysis, and problem solving skills. You can also register for the EA through their official portal or browse through some EA prep sources here and find free EA prep questions here

The EA test is a multiple-choice, computer adaptive test (CAT) – this means that an algorithm selects each following question based on the test taker’s ability level and performance on previous questions. If you are new to this concept, the most important feature to understand is that, when you answer a question correctly, the following question will be even more challenging. Conversely, if you answer a question incorrectly, it will give you an easier one next.

What Is The EA Exam Used For?

The Executive Assessment is primarily used for admissions to nearly 100 institutions, universities, and MBA and EMBA programs worldwide which offer business and management disciplines. Keep in mind that many business schools screen applicants based on a range of criteria, but EA scores are among the most important screening metrics used. Others include undergraduate GPA, work and other relevant experience, application essays, recommendation letters, and personal interviews.

Strong EA results are necessary, but certainly not sufficient to gain admission to the best MBA/EMBA and business-oriented grad schools programs like Masters of Finance (MFin), Masters of Accounting (MAcct), Masters of Business Administration (MBA), Juris Doctor & Masters of Business Administration (JD-MBA) and PhDs in all these disciplines. Remember,  that while the EA is important, it’s certainly not a measure of who you are as a person and is one part of a many-faceted application. 

An investment of time and resources into the right EA preparation program or plan will result in a higher score on the test, which has a direct correlation with your admissions success and will have a positive impact on your business school experience and future professional career.

EA Structure, Sections, Timing, & Scoring

The EA test consists of three sections with categorized problems aiming to assess a different skill set. Each part differs in terms of score range and the number and types of problems:

1. Integrated Reasoning (IR) 12 questions | 30 minutes | scored from 0 to 20
There are four types of questions on the Integrated Reasoning section: 

      • Multi-source reasoning
      • Graphic interpretation 
      • Two-part analysis 
      • Table analysis

2. Quantitative 14 questions | 30 minutes | scored from 0 to 20
There are two types of problems on the Quantitative section: 

      • Data sufficiency   
      • Problem solving

3. Verbal 14 questions | 30 minutes | scored from 0 to 20
There are three types of questions on the Verbal section:

      • Reading comprehension
      • Critical reasoning 
      • Sentence correction

There are several other factors worth mentioning:

  • The Executive Assessment is meant for busy professionals. Many of whom have already been working professionally for around 7 years. 
  • The total score of the EA ranges from 100 to 200 
  • Despite the official scoring guides, the maximum you can score on EA is 174 and the minimum being 126.
  • The total time to take the EA test is 90 minutes.
  • As the total time of the EA is 90 minutes, test takers are not given any breaks. 
  • All three sections are weighted equally towards your overall score. 

EA Scoring & Validity

You’ll get your unofficial score when you complete your exam. You and your designated schools will receive your official EA score within 24 hours of the exam, and it will be valid for the following five years. In order to determine what score will be good for you, you should consider both the average (mean) EA score and the range of scores of applicants admitted to your desired university.

If you find yourself lost in the translation of the EA scores into percentiles, this article explains it in a meticulous way. 

What is a Good EA Score?

What is a good Executive Assessment score, and how can I get one? We are frequently asked this question, but the answer varies depending on who we speak with. Here at Apex, we want to help our clients obtain their goal EA scores because this is where they can truly compete for top programs and be eligible for MBA and EMBA scholarships. However a “good EA score” is determined by the applicant’s MBA program’s requirements; some programs demand a score above 150, while others require a score above 155. Selecting the programs you wish to attend and examining their MBA and EMBA class profile will supply you with this knowledge and equip you with a solid foundation from which to begin your EA preparation.

In case you are wondering what a 155 EA score can do for you, here is all you need to know!

How, When, & Where Can I Take The EA Exam?

How?

We recommend registering two to three months before your desired exam date. The scheduling can be done online (applicant needs to open an account) or through a phone call (applicant needs to call the EA Customer Service in their region). For more information visit gmac.com/executive-assessment.   

Where?

You can take the EA at one of 600+ test centers worldwide or online in the comfort of your own home. You can search for a testing location near you here. The test is administered on a computer, via a platform used worldwide: Pearson VUE. The EA is available only at designated Pearson VUE test centers, thus assuring each candidate the exact same experience as all other test takers around the world.

When?

You can take the EA test almost anytime you want, depending on the availability of dates into the test center(s) you have chosen. However, there are some requirements regarding re-taking the exam. You can retake the exam as soon as you’d like, however you may only take the exam up to two times. 

EA Exam Day FAQs

Here are the top 3 questions that clients ask us about exam day information:

1. What should I do if I fall sick on the exam day?

If you do not feel well come exam day you will have to make the decision as to whether or not you can take the test and perform at your best. Most people will not be able to do this, so it will be best to cancel. If you do so on the day of the exam, you will incur a loss of your full $350 exam fee. If you cancel the exam up to 24 hours in advance you will receive only a $250 refund. However, rescheduling the exam between 24-48 hours will only incur a fee of $75 while rescheduling the appointment more than 48 hours out does not incur a fee. 

2. What can I bring with me to the test center?

You are allowed in the test center with the following:

    • EA approved identification
    • Appointment confirmation letter or email you received from Pearson VUE
    • Prescription eyeglasses
    • Light sweater or light non-outerwear jacket
    • Comfort items only if they were pre-approved as an accommodation received in advance

Any additional personal belongings that you bring with you such as your cell phone, bag, snacks, and earphones will need to be stored in one of the provided lockers. Any cell phone use throughout the test time is prohibited.
The test center will provide you with everything that you need in order to take the test including scratch paper and a pencil.

3. What can I expect at the test center?

A usual test center is typically quite small. Once you arrive you will have to provide the administrator with the relevant documents and while these are being processed you will be asked to wait in the waiting area. In this area, you can still access all your personal belongings up until you are called into the testing room.

Once in the room, you will be allocated an individual exam station where you will find a computer.

Here is the full list of the EA Exam Day FAQs

4. How Much Does The EA Test Cost?

The cost to sit the EA exam is $350. This includes sending your results to up to five schools of your choice. There are no fees for sending your scores to any additional school. 

Rescheduling & Cancellation of your EA appointment
Regular Rescheduling fees:

  • No Fee if requested more than 48 hours prior to appointment
  • $75 if requested 24 to 48 hours prior to appointment (Temporarily waived)
  • $10 to reschedule the assessment by phone 
  • Regular Cancellation fees:
  • $100 to cancel up to 24 hours before the appointment
  • $10 to cancel the assessment by phone. 

Additional Costs Worth Considering
Apart from the test fee, there are other costs that you may want to consider. GMAC advises people preparing for the exam to utilize the EA Official Guide (as do we) alongside other learning aids as additional materials. Please note that the Official Guide is a great resource for problems, but the explanations leave something to be desired, so using only the Official Guide is not recommended.

A large percentage of test takers who wish to score in the 90th percentile or higher (157+) on the EA invest in private EA preparation as a personalized means to achieving long-term career success. Our firm, Apex , specializes in offering private, customized EA preparation and admissions consulting. We focus on individual learning and a holistic coaching environment where we tackle not only the fundamentals but the underlying structure and complexity of the EA.

We do this not just to get you a good score, but to prepare you for your MBA/EMBA program and career beyond by focusing on universal critical thinking skills, cognitive heuristics, emotional and behavioral aspects of learning and high stakes performance, and other learning techniques that can be applied widely over the course of a lifetime. We take pride in exactly this personalized approach as a means for every candidate to utilize their strengths better, focus on their weaknesses, and overcome test anxiety through an exclusively designed EA curriculum.

A lot of people try to save money on the EA preparation process. When you consider that a top EMBA can lead to millions of dollars of extra earnings over the course of a lifetime, it makes sense to invest in EA preparation. Learn more about this subject with our instructors Mike and Jaymes, here: Why is Test Prep so Expensive?

EA History & Background

In March of 2016, the Executive Assessment made its debut in the standardized test world. It was a novel test designed for working professionals who wished to undertake an EMBA. The creators of the EA, the GMAC, wished to create an exam which tested the real-world skills working professionals have gained throughout their careers. 

As the EA is a newish test on the testing market, it is only accepted at a handful of schools. This list, however, is constantly expanding. Because of this, be sure to double check the official EA site to keep up-to-date on which schools accept the EA. 

Online EA Test

The Executive Assessment is available online. However, it is encouraged by the GMAC that those who feel safe to do so, take the EA at a test center.
In terms of content, the EA online has the same structure and content as the test taken at a test center.
Registering for the EA online is the same process as registering to take the exam in person. Just be sure to select the ‘online’ (at home) option when selecting your test location. 
Interested test takers are able to take the EA at any home location so long as they have the necessary technology to do so. However, test takers in Mainland China, Cuba, Iran, North Korea, Sudan, and South Sudan are not able to take the EA online.

 

That’s it! Thanks for sticking with us to the end of this EA test crash course! If you are looking for a more comprehensive version diving deeper into what the EA has in store for you, feel free to check out our website for more information

 

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GMAT Most Asked Questions
Posted on
03
May 2022

GMAT Most Asked Questions 2022

If you’re thinking about taking the GMAT or have already registered for a testing date, you undoubtedly have a ton of questions swirling around in your mind. In this blog post, we’ll answer some of the GMAT FAQs in 2022.

1. What does GMAT stand for?

The GMAT stands for General Management Admission Test. The GMAT is a standardized test that measures your analytical, writing, quantitative, and verbal skills. The GMAT is used by business schools to help decide which applicants to admit into their programs.

2. Who conducts the GMAT exam?

The administrator of the GMAT is the General Management Admission Council (GMAC).

3. Why is the GMAT exam required for MBA?

The exam is considered to be a predictor of academic success for MBA programs and business careers. The GMAT tests reasoning and problem-solving skills, and critical thinking. It is also a measure of verbal, mathematical, and analytical writing skills.

4. When can I register for the GMAT 2022?

You can register for the GMAT between 6 months to 24 hours before the exam. However, we recommend you register 3 months in advance. 

5. How do I register for the GMAT 2022?

To register online you will need to:

    • Create an account on the mba.com website.
    • Verify your email.
    • Book a date.
    • Pay the application fee of $250.

You can also register through fax, phone, or mailThe registration process can take 15 to 30 minutes. 

6. How much does the GMAT cost?

The GMAT costs $250, approximately 230 euros and 190 pounds. The price may differ by country.

7. Where to take the GMAT?

You can find the nearest testing center on the mba.com website or take the exam online. 

8. Can the GMAT exam be taken online?

Yes, the GMAT exam can be taken online. The GMAC has decided to make the online GMAT a permanent option, after it was introduced at the beginning of the pandemic, along with in-person exams. 

9. When is the GMAT exam held in 2022?

GMAT is available almost all year round. Testing dates are available 6 months in advance. You can book an available slot in the nearest testing center, appointments are usually available 6 days a week in most countries. If you are taking the GMAT online, you can take the exam 7 days a week.

We recommend registering 3 months in advance or no more than 3 weeks ahead.

10. How to reschedule my GMAT exam?

You can reschedule your GMAT online or by phone up to 24 hours prior to the exam. Note that if you cancel by phone, you will be charged an additional fee of $10. A rescheduling fee applies if you decide to reschedule your exam:

    • 14 days to 24 hours prior to the exam: $150
    • 15 to 60 days prior to the exam: $100
    • 60 days prior to the exam: $50

11. How often can I take the GMAT?

You can take the GMAT 5 times in a 12-months period. However, you can’t take it more than once in a 16-day period. However, we recommend not to retake the exam in less than 3 months. It’s unlikely that your score would improve drastically in a short period of time.

12. Are GMAT and GRE similar?

The main difference between GMAT and GRE is that the GMAT is designed specifically for business schools, while the GRE is accepted by a series of master’s programs. The GRE keeps your options open in case you haven’t made up your mind about your master’s degree. However, keep in mind that not all business schools accept GRE. Also, make sure you contact your admissions office and check which exam they prefer.

13. How long should I study for the GMAT?

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question. The GMAT journey is unique to everyone, and you’re the only one to know what’s right for you. However, on average candidates spend 3-6 months preparing for the GMAT. We recommend a 3-month GMAT study plan, which can be shrunk or stretched according to your schedule.

14. Can GMAT be cracked without a private tutor?

When you start preparing for the GMAT, you need to establish some goals and a study plan. Achieving the score you’re aiming for is not an easy mission. The GMAT prep requires perfect preparation and continuous motivation and dedication. If you find yourself falling behind and you aren’t anywhere near where you planned to be, you might consider hiring a GMAT tutor. Having someone by your side step-by-step can make the prep journey easier on academic and social aspects.

Before hiring a GMAT tutor do your research to find the best tutor for you. At Apex we offer personalized tutoring according to each candidate’s needs. We provide a free complimentary consultation call for your questions about GMAT private tutoring.

15. Can I use a calculator on the GMAT?

You are not allowed to bring in your own calculator. However, you will be provided with a calculator only during the Integrated Reasoning section. During the Quantitative section, you won’t be able to use a calculator, but you will be given a note board and markers to do calculations.

16. Can I skip questions on the GMAT exam?

No, you need to provide an answer before moving to the next questions. The GMAT is a computer-adaptive test (CAT) which means that the questions’ difficulty adapts to your skill level. As you progress, the difficulty of the next question is based on your performance on the previous one. Therefore, you can’t skip a question.

17. Are GMAT questions repeated?

Yes, and no. GMAT questions don’t repeat but the concepts and the patterns do. Often elements of some questions will be reused to formulate a new one, but not the same question.

18. How does the GMAT scoring work?

The way GMAT scoring works can be complicated since it’s a CAT. The GMAT is scored on a scale from 200 to 800, with 800 being a perfect score. Each section of the GMAT is scored individually.

The overall 800-score is done by a confidential algorithm by the GMAC.

19. Are the GMAT results instant?

Right after the exam, you will have an unofficial report with the scores of your Quant, Verbal and Integrated Reasoning section. You have up to two minutes to accept or cancel them. If you don’t make a decision your score will be automatically canceled.

In case you accept the results, you and the schools you have chosen to send the reports to will receive an official report up to 20 days after the exam. The official report will also include the Analytical Assessment score and your GMAT percentile ranking. 

In case you cancel your results, they won’t show up on your score report.

20. What GMAT score do I need?

There is no “passing” score on the GMAT. To know what score you’re aiming for, you need to check the class profile and the admission requirements of the programs you’re looking at. Your score goal may differ depending on your school(s) needs.  

21. Can I cancel my GMAT score?

You can cancel your GMAT score immediately after the exam at no cost. The score can be canceled up to 72 hours after the exam for a fee. If you cancel your score, it will not be shown on your score reports. If you cancel your score and want to reinstate it, you can do so online or by phone for a fee of $50. An additional $10 fee applies if you cancel by phone.

22. For how many years is the GMAT valid?

Your GMAT score is valid for 5 years after you take the exam.

23. Can the GMAT be waived?

Few schools in the US have policies for waving the GMAT, those are usually significant professional work experience, degrees, or high achievements. The applications are reviewed on a case-by-case basis. Other schools accept the GRE instead of the GMAT.

 

If you have questions that we haven’t answered, book a 30-minute complimentary consultation call with one of our top GMAT instructors or check our article on GMAT Test Days FAQs.

 

Contributor: Cynthia Addoumieh

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EA Integrated Reasoning Section - All You Need To Know
Posted on
20
Apr 2022

EA Integrated Reasoning Section – All You Need To Know

The Executive Assessment exam is considered to be a relatively short exam for admission to an EMBA program, but it manages to cover a wide range of topics. That being said, knowing the structure of the exam, as well as what to expect on the test day is a huge part of your EA prep.

The Integrated Reasoning is one of the three sections on the EA exam and it is scored from 0 to 18. It requires a complex preparation that will help you develop verbal and quantitative skills, the ability to read charts and graphs, and actually get insights from those charts. In this article, we are going to share with you everything you need to know about the EA Integrated Reasoning section – from what this section consists of to some important aspects of the preparation that you need to consider.

1. What is the Structure of the EA Integrated Reasoning Section?

The EA Integrated Reasoning section is divided into 4 categories – Graphics Interpretation, Table Analysis, Two-Part Analysis, and Multi-Source Reasoning. Each of the categories contains 12 questions. A test-taker has 30 minutes to answer the 12 questions or about 2.5 minutes per question. The 12 questions are divided into two modules of 6 questions each. Depending on the test-taker’s performance in the first module of questions, the difficulty of the questions in the second module varies. The more complex questions you answer in the first module, the more complex you will get in the second module, and eventually, you can get a higher score.

2. What is the Scoring on the EA Integrated Reasoning Section?

All three sections on the EA exam are scored in the same way. The official score on each section is ranged between 0 and 20. The score from each section has the same weight in the EA total score and the final grade.

3. What are the different types of questions? 

There are the four types of Integrated Reasoning questions included in the EA exam:

  • Two-part Analysis

The questions in this category ask you to select two answers from a set of choices presented in a table. The two answers have to be related to each other somehow, so you need to look for some analogy or connection between them. The questions will be quantitative or verbal, a.k.a. based on a mathematical problem or a scenario. Although the questions in this part may seem relatively easy to test-takers, they can be tricky. Sometimes, in these types of problems, you may have very little information to find the relationship between the two answers.  In such cases, you will need to select the only options available that fit that relationship, which may be rather challenging.

Example:

Consider the sets S, T and U, where

S = {35, 14, 64, 23, 49, 67}
T = {x, 35, 14, 64, 23, 49, 67} and
U = {y, 35, 14, 64, 23, 49, 67}

The mean of T is 5 less than the mean of S. The median of U is 9 less than the median of S.

Select the value of x and the value of y consistent with the statements given. Make two selections, one in each column.Two-Part Analysis

 

  • Graphics Interpretation

The questions in this category ask you to work with some information presented in a graph, chart, or some other form of data-visualization (i.e. bar-graph, stacked-bar graph, x-y scatter plot, etc.). You have to analyze the information and select the right answers based on it. The question addresses math concepts such as statistics, correlation, ratios, etc. In this part, it is important to learn how these concepts look graphically and get used to reading the graphs or charts.

Example:

Graphic Interpretation

Refer to the pictograph of a survey of attendees at the annual meeting of an international hotels group. Each symbol represents 13 companies in a sample of 390. Use the drop-down menus to complete each statement according to the information presented in the diagram. If one company is selected at random from the 390 surveyed, the chance that the company will be located in only one nation or headquartered outside of Europe or both is _____

A: 1 out of 6
B: 1 out of 3
C: 2 out of 3
D: 5 out of 6

If one company is selected at random from the 390 surveyed, the chance that the company will be both located in a single country and headquartered outside of Europe is _____

A: 1 out of 6
B: 1 out of 3
C: 2 out of 3
D: 5 out of 6

 

  • Table Analysis

The questions in this category present data in the form of a table and require you to answer Yes/No or True/False questions about the data in the table. You can sort the columns of the table in different ways to make their reading and understanding easier. That is why being able to sort functions effectively could be an essential skill you need to answer the Table Analysis questions. The first step to the solution of each problem is exactly to decide which “sort” function you are going to use. In terms of the topics, one can expect them to be somehow similar to those covered in the Graphics Interpretation category.

Example: 

For each of the following statements, select Yes if the statement is true based solely on the information in the table; otherwise select No.

Table Analysis Part 1

The table shows circulation data, by non-fiction classification, for books in a certain library system in November 2003. Percentages are given to the nearest 0.1 percent.

Table Analysis Part 2

 

  • Multi-Source Reasoning

The questions in this category present some information in the form of multiple texts as each text will be based on a single subject. You need to answer questions that are based on that specific text. You have to work with multiple texts which will include some sort of data. Being able to understand this data will be very helpful to you because you can go ahead and use the insights from that data to answer the questions. As you might have guessed, this category requires you to mix quantitative, verbal, and data-interpretation skills. You have to try to look beyond the most obvious tab and seek information that could be hidden somewhere in the paragraph.

Example:

Definition of musician: Any person who uses a device created to produce sound through blowing air, vibrating a string, striking a surface, or electronic means, or uses parts of their own body, with the intent of creating sound for the purpose of entertainment, communication, self-improvement, education, or production of an emotional response. This definition of musician fails to capture the standard concept of a musician in that it allows for the inclusion of some things that are not ordinarily thought of as musicians, for example, people who _____,

A: play many instruments
B: perform their music as a paid profession
C: turn on a stereo for their own enjoyment
D: write music for the purpose of others performing it
E: work as piano movers
F: teach the history of music

and excludes some things that are ordinarily thought of as musicians, for example, people who _____.

A: play many instruments
B: perform their music as a paid profession
C: turn on a stereo for their own enjoyment
D: write music for the purpose of others performing it
E: work as piano movers
F: teach the history of music

Conclusion

Understanding the structure, scoring, and different types of questions of the EA Integrated Reasoning section will help you to prepare better for the section as you will know what to expect and work on. It is important to develop a strategy on how to tackle the complex and multi-layered problems included in this section. You need to work on your ability to read and analyze graphs and charts, find and evaluate relationships in data, synthesize information from various texts, etc. We know that this may be a challenging task! At Apex we are more than happy to support you on your EA journey and assist you in every step of the process. You can sign-up for a 30-minute complimentary consultation call with one of our instructors who can help you ace any section on your EA exam!

 

Contributor: Diana Materova

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