gmat calculator
Posted on
26
Nov 2020

GMAT Calculator & Mental Math – All You Need To Know

by Apex GMAT

Contributor: Ilia Dobrev

November 26, 2020

Are calculators allowed on the GMAT? It seems like a pretty straightforward question, but the details are a bit more complicated. 

The short answer is: yes and no. In fact, the calculator question holds the key for a strong performance on the exam as a whole. This article explains when calculator use is permitted and, more importantly, when using a calculator isn’t the best approach to solving a given problem.  

So if you’re used to using a calculator on math tests, don’t worry! We’ve provided a list of some handy mental math techniques and time saving strategies that will enhance your performance on the Quant section and beyond. 

Calculators on the GMAT | Explained

  • You are not allowed to bring your own calculator to the GMAT exam.

According to the GMAC, no personal items are allowed in the exam room at any certified test center.

However, the proctor will provide a blank canvas with plenty of space to perform any necessary calculations by hand.

  • You cannot use a calculator on the Quantitative section.

There’s no reason to be intimidated by the restriction on calculators. Although most of us are used to using calculators for arithmetic, the GMAT is not designed to test your ability to perform complex mathematical operations. The Quant section draws from secondary-level math and basic algebra and geometry to test other skill sets, such as critical thinking, logical reasoning, and problem solving. 

In fact, the majority of the Quant questions can and should be answered without any calculations beyond estimation. 

For example, data sufficiency problems, which are more geared towards reasoning than math skills, typically only call for basic calculations and estimation. If you do need to do math, keep in mind that the GMAC designers usually keep numbers simple and avoid decimals. If you see large numbers or complex fractions, it’s a good bet that there’s an easier solution path. 

For another example of how mental math can save you time, see our explanation of the movie night combinatorics problem

  • You can use an on-screen calculator on the Integrated Reasoning section.

Surprisingly or not, a calculator will be provided for the Integrated Reasoning section. This GMAT calculator has the standard basic functions, CE (clear entry) button, C (clear) button, an sqrt function, a % (percentage) button, and a 1/x button that calculates the reciprocal of the entry currently on the screen. There is also a row with the standard memory functions

    • MS (memory store) stores the current entry in the calculator’s memory.
    • MR (memory recall) displays the last number stored in the calculator’s memory.
    • M+ (memory addition) adds the current entry to the value stored in the calculator’s memory. This button is helpful when you need to add a long series of numbers, but don’t have time to retype each one.
    • MC (memory clear) erases whatever is in the current memory. Use it before every new calculation set.

Improve your Mental Math and Reduce Calculator Dependence

Survival Tips & Tricks

  • Do not overuse the IR calculator.

Although the GMAT provides a basic calculator for the Integrated Reasoning section, don’t use it too often. You’ll waste more time than you save. However, you can apply some of the same solution paths used in the Quant section to problems in Integrated Reasoning.

  • Practice mental math operations regularly.

Mental math operations are easy to learn with some practice, and mastering mental math can provide a significant morale boost leading up to your test date. You can add, multiply, subtract, and divide when you pay bills, check out at the grocery store, calculate a tip, etc. without using a calculator.

Try putting away the calculator and practicing mental math in your daily life to save time and, ultimately, enhance your GMAT score.

  • Make accurate estimations

Learning to estimate efficiently is the key to saving considerable amounts of time on the GMAT. Convert unwieldy numbers to more manageable figures, like 0 or 5, for the quicker calculations. Then, you can browse the answer choices and select the answer that’s closest to your preliminary estimate.

  • Don’t use a calculator when prepping for the Quant section.

Preparing without a calculator is a great way to practice mental math operations outside of your daily life. The test setting and Quant context will help accustom you to the environment. You’ll feel more prepared if you know exactly what to expect on test day. 

  • Familiarize yourself with a basic GMAT calculator and practice using its memory functions.

Since the on-screen calculator will be your only technical aid during the Integrated Reasoning section, it’s smart to spend some time getting used to it. When you’re pressed for time, the calculator’s memory function can be a crucial tool for staying on track with a healthy exam pace. 

  • Look to the answer choices to guide your strategy.

Sometimes, you can eliminate a couple of answer choices immediately. 

Even when time is in short supply, you can make educated guesses and use your reasoning skills to boost your chance of arriving at the correct answer.

  • Don’t panic if you see big numbers.

Keep in mind that the people behind the GMAT are aware that they’re designing questions to be answered without calculators. This limits the difficulty of the arithmetic and encourages test-takers to look for the more straightforward approach.

Read more
gmat probability problems
Posted on
20
Nov 2020

GMAT How-to: Probability Problems

GMAT probability questions, which test logical reasoning skills, tend to be quite daunting. The good news is that they don’t appear very frequently; the Quant section contains no more than three or four probability questions. However, since so many test-takers struggle with these questions, mastering probability can be an excellent way to boost your overall score. 

GMAT probability questions aren’t so hard once you’ve grasped the basic concepts. Like the majority of the Quant section, probability questions only cover high school level material. The principle challenge is the tricky wording. 

This article will cover some methods to simplify probability questions and boost your Quant score. 

What Is Probability?

The first step to mastering probability is to break down the basic idea:

Probability = the number of desired outcomes / the total number of outcomes

Or in other words, the chance of something happening is the quotient of the number of desired outcomes and the total number of possible outcomes.

A coin flip is one generic example that can help us understand probability.

There are two possible outcomes when we flip a coin: heads or tails. If we want the coin to land on heads, then we divide 1 (the chance that the coin will land on the desired outcome, heads) by 2 (all possible outcomes, heads and tails), and the result is ½ or 0.5 (50%), meaning that there is a 50% chance that the coin will land on heads.

Although this is an elementary example, it demonstrates the fundamental concept behind all probability problems–a ratio between a part and a whole expressed as a fraction or percentage.

Probability of Independent Events

The probability of x discrete events occurring is the product of all individual probabilities.

For example, imagine that we toss a coin twice. Each toss is independent of the other, meaning that each toss has an equal chance of landing on either heads or tails (0.5). If we want to calculate the chance of getting heads twice in a row, we need to multiply the probability of getting heads the first time by the probability of getting heads the second time. 

Or, represented as an equation:

 ½ x ½ = ¼ 

We get a 0.25 or 25% chance that the coin will land on heads twice. 

Probability of Getting Either A or B

Keep in mind that the sum of all possible events is equal to 1 (100%). 

If we continue with the coin toss example, we know that the probability of landing on heads is 0.5, and that the probability of landing on tails is also 0.5. Therefore:

0.5 + 0.5 = 1

The possibility of landing on either heads or tails is equal to 1, or 100%. In other words, every time we flip a coin, we can be certain that it will land on heads or tails.

Probability Of An Event Not Occurring

Following the concept that the sum of all possible events is 1, we can conclude that the probability of event A not happening (A’) is 1 – A, or equal to the probability of event B occurring.

The chance that the coin will not land on heads is equal to the chance that the coin will land on tails:

1 – 0.5 = 0.5

This method is most useful in situations with many favorable events and fewer unfavorable ones. Since time management is essential on the GMAT, it’s better to avoid solution paths that require more calculations. Subtracting the number of unfavorable events from the whole is quicker and simpler, and thus, less likely to result in mistakes.

Pay Attention to Keywords

Read each problem’s wording with great care to determine exactly which operations to use. 

For example, if the problem uses the word “and,” you need to find the product of the probabilities. If the question uses the word “or,” you need to solve for their sum.

If we flipped one coin and we wanted to know the chances of landing on either heads or tails, we would calculate it like this:

0.5 + 0.5 = 1

Similarly, if we were to toss two coins and we wanted to find the probability of landing on both heads and tails, we would use this equation:

0.5 x 0.5 = 0.25

Avoid Common Errors

Minor errors, such as missing possible events, can lead to incorrect answers.

These pointers will help you avoid some common mistakes on probability questions:

  • List all possible events before starting any calculations;
  • Sum up the probabilities of all possible events to make sure they add up to 1;
  • If there are several different arrangements possible (for example, picking different colored balls from a box), find the probability of one of the events and multiply it by the number of different possible arrangements.

If you enjoyed this article make sure to check out our other How To articles like: Efficient Learning & Verbal section.

Read more
GMAT in new york
Posted on
17
Nov 2020

Taking the GMAT Exam in New York

Table of Contents:

  1. Who administers the GMAT test?
  2. What does the test center look like?
  3. Where are the test centers located?
  4. Test center holidays
  5. Top MBA programs in the area
  6. Tips
  7. Test Day FAQs

About ¾ of the way through your extensive GMAT prep you should begin to start planning your test day, including scheduling the test, preparing your trip to the test center, and even pre-visiting the test center so that you know exactly where it is. This guide is here to offer you all the required information related to taking the GMAT in New York. 

Who administers the GMAT test?

Pearson Professional Centers – administers the GMAT and EA exam on behalf of the GMAC. To find out more about the Pearson Professional test centers visit https://www.pearson.com/us/

What does the test center look like?

A Pearson Professional Center will include individual testing areas for each test taker with a separation screen between each test-taker.

Where are the test centers in New York?

These are the top 3 locations where test-takers generally had the best experience:

Pearson Professional Centers- NY (Herald Square)

31 West 34th Street

Suite 1001

New York, New York 10001

United States

Phone: 212-967-0471

By car:
From Central Manhattan (19 minutes):
    • Head northeast on 

  • East Dr toward E 90th St
  • Keep right to continue on Malcolm X Blvd
  • Turn right onto Central Park N
  • Central Park N turns right and becomes Duke Ellington Circle
  • Turn right onto 5th Ave
  • Turn right after Reinlieb Laurence (on the right)
  •  Destination will be on the left

By train:

  • Should take around 22 minutes

Test-takers’ review:

This test center was rated 4.3 by Google reviewers. Testing stations are clean and comfortable and the staff was friendly and professional. They also mentioned that the room temperature was colder than usual, so make sure to bring a sweater or jacket.

Pearson Professional Centers-Forest Hills NY

118-35 Queens Boulevard

Suite 1260, 12th Floor

Forest Hills Tower

Forest Hills, New York 11375

United States

Phone: 718-263-3801

By car:

From Queens Center (7 minutes):

  • Get on I-495 E
  • Continue on I-495 E. Take I-678 S/Van Wyck Expy to Union Tpke. Take exit 7 from I-678 S/Van Wyck Expy
  • Follow Union Tpke to New York 25 Service/Queens Blvd

Test-takers’ reviews:

This test center was rated 4.3 by Google reviewers. They generally had a great test-taking experience. The staff was polite and professional and the waiting rooms were comfortable. It was also mentioned that the testing-rooms were a bit hot.

Pearson Professional Centers-Yonkers NY

73 Market Street

Suite 374

Ridge Hill

Yonkers, New York 10710

United States

Phone: 914-423-8437

By car:

From Yonkers (12 minutes):

  • Head northeast toward S Broadway
  • Get on Cross County Pkwy
  • Continue on Cross County Pkwy. Take I-87 N to Ridge Hill Boulevard. Take exit 6A from I-87 N
  • Continue on Ridge Hill Boulevard. Drive to Market Street

Test-takers’ reviews:

This test center was rated 4.5 by Google reviewers. The reviewers mentioned that the staff was helpful and polite as well as courteous. The environment was neat, clean, and professional and the building had easy access to the highway.

Test Center Holidays:

The most popular times for GMAT preparation and test-taking are during the holiday seasons. Be mindful of dates that you will not be able to take the GMAT or EA at any of the test centers mentioned above. Pearson test centers are closed during the following dates:

  • 1 Jan – New Year’s Day 
  • 2 Apr – Good Friday   
  • 5 Apr – Easter Monday 
  • 3 May – May Day 
  • 31 May – Late May Bank Holiday   
  • 30 Aug – August Bank Holiday
  • 25 Dec – Christmas Day
  • 26 Dec – Boxing Day 
  • 27 Dec – Christmas Holiday
  • 28 Dec – Boxing Day Holiday 

Top MBA programs in New York

Read more
MBA Admissions Consulting: Which Exam is Right For You?
Posted on
05
Nov 2020

MBA Admissions Consulting: Which Exam is Right For You

by ApexGMAT

Contributors: Fatma Xhafa & Svetozara Saykova

November 5, 2020

 

Are you ready to get a Master’s degree and take the business world by a storm? The first thing to consider is which admissions exam to prepare for. There are a handful of tests that MBA programs use to assess applicants. The GMAT, GRE, EA, INSEAD, and  ieGAT are the most common. Generally, these exams are more alike than not, but each exam presents unique challenges. APEX consultants can help you decide which is right for you.

 

Table of contents

  • The GMAT
  • The GRE
  • The Executive Assessment
  • The INSEAD Assessment
  • The ieGAT Assessment

GMAT

The Graduate Management Admissions Test, commonly known as the GMAT, is an assessment administered by the Graduate Management Admissions Council (GMAC). It is used for admission to MBA programs around the globe. 

The GMAT consists of 4 sections—Integrated Reasoning, Analytical Writing Assessment, Verbal, and Quantitative. Each section examines a particular set of essential business skills. The GMAT tests a variety of skills due to its computer adaptive nature, which is also what makes it so challenging.  

 

GMAT Sections Types of Questions Duration
Analytical Writing Assessment
  • short essay
30 minutes
Integrated Reasoning
  • multi-source reasoning
  • table analysis
  • graphics interpretation
  • two-part analysis
30 minutes
Verbal
  • sentence correction
  • reading comprehension
  • critical reasoning
65 minutes 
Quantitative
  • problem solving
  • data sufficiency 
61 minutes

 

The total price for sitting the GMAT is $250 (as of October 2020 €230 , £203). This includes sending the official scores to five MBA programs of your choice. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the GMAT is also offered online until December 2020. 

A 700+ GMAT score can open doors to some of the world’s most elite MBA programs, so don’t hesitate! Apex’s dedicated tutors can help get you there; time zone differences, busy schedules, and distance are nonissues for our team. Schedule a call at your convenience to discuss prep options and jumpstart your journey to success. 

GRE 

The Graduate Record Examination, or the GRE for short, is facilitated by the Educational Testing Service (ETS). Thousands of MBA, MS/MA and Ph.D programs accept the GRE.

There are two types of GRE—the General Exam and the Subject Test. The General Exam is designed to examine analytical writing, quantitative ability, and verbal reasoning skills, and the Subject Test evaluates the candidate’s knowledge in a particular field of study. The subject exams include Mathematics, English Literature, Chemistry, Biology, Biochemistry, Physics and Psychology. The Subject Test is required for most specialized Master’s programs.

The General Exam consists of three sections: Analytical Writing, Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning. The GRE has a pattern in terms of section order: the Analytical Writing section will always be the first, and can either be followed by the Verbal, Quantitative, or unscored sections in any order. 

You may be wondering what those unscored sections test for. Unscored sections only appear on the computer-based exam and vary in content. There is no set number or time allocation for unscored sections. 

Each other section, however, has a set number of problems and time limit.

GRE Sections  Computer-based GRE Paper-based GRE
Analytical Writing 1 section – 2 tasks

60 minutes

2 section – 2 tasks

60 minutes

Verbal Section  2 sections – 40 questions

60 minutes

2 section – 50 questions

70 minutes

Quantitative Section  2 sections – 40 questions 

70 minutes

2 section – 50 questions

80 minutes

Unscored varies N/A
Research  varies N/A

 

The fee for the GRE General test varies by country between $205-$255 (as of October 2020 €175-218, £159-197). The GRE Subject Test costs $150 (as of October 2020 €128, £116)

Apex’s team of experienced consultants provides personalized GRE preparation, following the most comprehensive and intensive curriculum available. Schedule a consultation to discuss your prep needs with one of our mentors. 

Executive Assessment

The Executive Assessment is designed to evaluate business school readiness based on a candidate’s experience. Many MBA programs accept this exam as an alternative to the GMAT. It’s also offered by the Graduate Management Admissions Council. 

Whereas the GMAT is a Computer Adaptive Test (CAT), the EA is a ‘multi-stage’ computer adaptive. This means that question sets are selected depending on answers to previous question sets.

The EA is designed for Executive MBA programs. As such, it’s designed for busy professionals and executives who might not have a lot of time to prepare. There are several advantages to taking the EA if you fit into this category. 

The exam consists of 3 sections: Integrated Reasoning, Verbal, and Quantitative. Each section has a 30-minute time limit, so the entire EA exam takes no more than 1.5 hours. Scores range from 100-200. All sections are weighted equally, which makes it easier to determine the total.

 

EA Sections  Questions Types of Questions
Integrated Reasoning 12
  • Multi-Source Reasoning
  • Graphics Interpretation
  • Two-Part Analysis
  • Table Analysis
Verbal  14
  • Reading Comprehension
  • Critical Reasoning
  • Sentence Correction
Quantitative  14
  • Data Sufficiency
  • Problem Solving

In addition to being only 90 minutes long, the EA is widely available in test centers. It’s possible to reschedule free of charge up to 48 hours before the appointment, and the results are available within 24 hours. Registration costs $350 (as of October 2020 €298, £268). Candidates can take the exam no more than twice.

For business programs that accept the EA, visit our featured list of EMBA programs.

Since the Executive Assessment is designed to be less time consuming than the GMAT, preparing for it also is less time consuming. Apex provides the most comprehensive EA prep on the market. Candidates can earn top scores through private tutoring, or in our EA class, which offers 10 hours of EA prep over the course of one weekend and 2 additional hours of one-on-one instruction. Find out more by scheduling a complimentary call with one of our instructors. 

INSEAD Assessment

INSEAD (Institut Européen d’Administration des Affaires) is an Executive MBA program. This program exclusively uses the INSEAD Assessment to evaluate candidates. 

The INSEAD’s structure is slightly different from the GMAT’s and as a result, the preparation is, too. It does not require an excessive amount of preparation time for math, geometry, or verbal questions. However, candidates must prepare for the exam’s format, in addition to refreshing verbal and quantitative skills.

INSEAD Sections  Number of Questions/ Time per section
Data Analysis 15 questions

30 minutes

Data Interpretation 15 questions

30 minutes

Communication Analysis 15 questions

30 minutes

Critical Thinking 15 questions

30 minutes

Case Presentation 30 minutes preparation,

15 minutes presentation

 

The exam can be taken once a month at any INSEAD campus in France, Singapore, or Abu Dhabi. Application must be submitted at least 2 weeks in advance of the exam date. Once applicants pass the pre-screening stage, they can confirm the test location and payment method. The exam costs 185 (as of October of 2020 $218, £167).

At Apex, we offer expert tutoring for the INSEAD Assessment. Our experienced instructors have extensive knowledge in everything from data analysis and interpretation to communication, critical thinking and case studies. We offer clients the flexibility to learn the ins and outs of the INSEAD in a relaxed environment.

ieGAT – IE Global Admissions Test

The ieGAT  is exclusive to the IE International University, which includes the IE business school in Spain. The ieGAT differs from the exams above in a number of ways. For starters, applicants can only take it once, so it’s highly important to be well prepared–you won’t get another shot.

In order to sit for the ieGAT, at least 25% of a candidate’s MBA application must be completed. The exam takes 80 minutes and includes 60 questions. Questions are tailored to the program that the applicant is interested in. The ieGAT is a pass/fail exam, and it’s the only test necessary for admission to IE University. 

The IE administers the Global Admissions Test in English and Spanish. The test’s language must match the language in which an applicant’s MBA program will be taught. 

ieGAT Sections 
Numerical and Verbal Reasoning
Logical – Abstract Reasoning

 

At Apex, we offer one-on-one ieGAT instruction. We provide our clients with personalized attention, flexibility, and an overall productive and enjoyable experience to ensure results. Our experts guide candidates through a multitude of solution paths in the Numerical and Verbal section, as well as the Abstract Reasoning section.

Determining which exam will help you achieve your goals might not be as simple as it seems, but talking to an experienced MBA consultant will get you started on the right path. Schedule a call with one of our consultants to discuss your aspirations, needs, and preparation options. 

Admissions Consulting 

Apex GMAT offers one-on-one tutoring for each of the exams described above. Next, it’s important to start thinking about applying to MBA programs. If you’re taking an exclusive exam, such as the ieGAT or INSEAD, you already know where you’ll be applying. Otherwise, Apex’s elite team can help you develop the skills you’ll need to land a spot in your dream program. Take the first step towards your future by scheduling a call with one of our top MBA admissions consulting experts today. 

Read more
quant score tips
Posted on
03
Nov 2020

7 Tips To Improve Your GMAT Quant Score

If you’ve experienced the GMAT, you may have noticed that your score is higher on some sections than others. Some otherwise strong business school candidates struggle with their score on the quantitative section. The problem might derive from preparation style, in which case, you might consider professional GMAT tutoring, a service offered by a number of organizations including Apex GMAT. Until then, these tips will help kick start your prep process so you’re ready to ace the quant section.

What’s on the GMAT Quantitative section?

First, let’s talk about what exactly the GMAT quant section consists of. Test takers have 62 minutes to answer 31 math problems. This means that on average, each question should take two minutes. However, this isn’t a hard rule, so there’s no need to get nervous if one problem takes longer than others. 

The questions are divided into two types: data sufficiency and problem-solving.

Data sufficiency questions ask test takers to analyze two given statements and determine whether the provided data tells readers enough to solve the problem. These questions are designed to evaluate quantitative fluency and critical thinking skills.

Problem-solving questions are multiple choice. They evaluate logical and analytical ability. 

Keep in mind that both question types require only algebra, arithmetic, and geometry, so there’s no need to worry about trigonometry or calculus. Moreover, all of the problems can be solved using basic high school level math. 

Why is the GMAT Quantitative section so difficult?

Based on the above description, you might think that the quant section won’t be too difficult. That isn’t exactly true. The GMAT is designed to confuse and restrict test takers in various ways. For example, each problem has a time limit and calculators aren’t allowed. Furthermore, problem solving and data sufficiency problems are in the same section, so test-takers must alternate between the two question types. These factors can cause stress. 

The following tips will help you remain calm and collected as you prepare for the quant section.

1: Don’t overthink the math

First and foremost, don’t forget that the GMAT quant section consists of simple math problems. Use this to your advantage. Don’t do all of the calculations; rather, determine what makes a problem look more difficult than it actually is. 

2: Start managing your time before the test

You can start saving time before you even pick up your pencil by practicing arithmetic. Limiting the time it takes to do simple equations means you can spend more time on the problems. Be sure to review exponent rules and brush up on decimals with fractions. And don’t forget about higher powers!

3: Use alternative strategies to find solutions

If you can’t solve a problem with simple math, try using an alternative path to the solution. There’s usually an easier way to solve quant problems–the GMAT is designed to test for efficient problem solving. Sometimes, straightforward logic or plugging in numbers will solve a problem faster. Keep in mind that a traditional approach might not be necessary for every problem. 

4: Analyze each sentence step by step

During the GMAT preparation process, learn how to simplify each question. Some problems might seem daunting, but they can be broken into smaller steps that you can solve one-by-one. Trying to solve the whole problem at once can lead test takers to answer the wrong question. The more you break down the problem, the easier it will become. Don’t worry–you’ll actually save time by (re-)reading the questions. 

Tip 5: Simplify the answer choices

In addition to simplifying the questions, the answer choices can also be simplified. For example, all data sufficiency questions use the same five answer choices: 

  1. Statement 1 alone is sufficient but statement 2 alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked.
  2. Statement 2 alone is sufficient but statement 1 alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked.
  3. Both statements 1 and 2 together are sufficient to answer the question but neither statement is sufficient alone.
  4. Each statement alone is sufficient to answer the question.
  5. Statements 1 and 2 are not sufficient to answer the question asked and additional data is needed to answer the statements.

Seems wordy, doesn’t it? Fortunately, you can memorize these simpler versions:

  1. only statement 1
  2. only statement 2
  3. both statements together
  4. either statement
  5. neither statement

Tip 6: Scratch paper is a must

Although scratch paper may seem unnecessary for quant problems, it can help you keep track of calculations and clarify your thought process. It might take a little extra time, but ultimately, avoidable mistakes are even more time consuming.

Tip 7: Plug in the answer choices 

Another way to save time with alternative solution paths is to start by reading all of the answer choices and plugging them into the problem. If you don’t know which answer choices to start with, start from the middle.

Bonus tip

The most important tip of all is practice, practice, and practice! There are many different ways to prepare: memorizing rules and formulas, watching GMAT problem-solving videos (don’t forget to check out our YouTube channel), and enrolling in professional GMAT courses

Follow us to learn more about the GMAT preparation process. Good luck on your exam!

Read more
Fortune 500 CEO’s with MBA’s
Posted on
29
Oct 2020

Fortune 500 CEO’s with MBA’s

Running a fortune 500 company seems like an out of reach dream for many, but some have climbed up the ranks of these companies to the ultimate position. Not all top CEO’s have obtained MBA’s at prestigious universities but it is clear that obtaining an MBA often leads to success in this role which is why so many CEO’s have an MBA. All the CEO’s on this list claim their continued success to their MBA studies coupled with determination and hard work.

Tim Cook

As the current Chief Executive Officer of Apple Inc., Tim Cook helped pull Apple out of its financial woes in the late 90’s with its founder Steve Jobs. Although he is most well-known for his position at Apple, Cook has had many influential positions including at IBM, Compaq and Intelligent Electronics. Like other successful people, Cook is known to work odd hours, sending his first emails of the day at 4:30am and holding Sunday strategy meetings. He graduated from the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University and this has undeniably helped shape him into the successful leader that he has become today. With a GMAT score range of 660 – 740, Duke’s MBA is a tough program to get accepted to but we expect that Cook’s creative and critical thinking skills allowed him to excel on the GMAT. Our guess: 750

Mary Barra

Mary Barra certainly earned her current position as the Chief Executive Officer of General Motors as she began working at the company at the age of 18. Over the years, she worked her way to the top, making her time at GM total over 30 years. She is the first female to hold the CEO position at the company and has been in it for 15 years. To ensure her continued upward growth in the company she attended Stanford Graduate Business School to obtain her MBA. Stanford has the highest average GMAT score of any of the top schools in the country at 737. Barra has not only successfully used her MBA to climb to the highest position in the company but has held many other leadership roles within the company on her journey to the top. We assume that she was determined to get a great score on the GMAT and achieved this as she attended the graduate school on a GM fellowship. Our guess: 740

Sundar Pichai

If you are not firstly familiar with him from being the CEO at Google, then you might recognize him from his congressional testimony in 2018. Sundar started off his career working at Mckinsey & Company and moved to Google in 2003 where he worked his way up the ladder through various positions until being offered the ultimate one, CEO. He was even considered for the CEO position at Microsoft but lost out to another member on our list: Satya Nadella. He obtained an MBA from Wharton School of Business where the GMAT average score is an impressive 732. We have no doubt that Sundar comfortably exceeds this range as his education history is crammed with awards and recognitions. Our guess: 770

Satya Nadella

Satya has enjoyed a very successful tenure as CEO of Microsoft having changed the direction of the company back to its roots successfully, tripling its stock price and transforming Microsoft’s corporate culture into a more collaborative and learning focused company. In 2018 he was named the best CEO of a US large firm and followed this by being named Person of the Year by the Financial Times. He has published a semi autobiography: Hit Refresh and has a passion for continued learning. He attended Booth School of Business which has an average GMAT score of 730. With all his success we are sure that Satya scored well above this. Our guess: 750

Indra Nooyi

Ranked as one of the most powerful women in the world for multiple years Indra Nooyi served as the CEO of Pepsi Co. for 12 years, from 2006 to 2018. Before her time at Pepsi she held high level positions at Johnson & Johnson, The Boston Consulting Group and Motorola. By 2014 she was making close to $17 million dollars a year and has received several awards and recognitions. She attended Yale School of Management and although she did not pursue an MBA, she would have still needed to take the GMAT to get into her Master’s in Private and Public Management program. Yale has a median GMAT score of 720 and Indra would attained a score that is close, if not exceeds this. Our Guess: 720

Jamie Dimon

Voted one of the most influential people by Time Magazine, Jamie Diamon is the CEO and Chairman of JPMorgan Chase. He started his career at American Express after turning down offers from Goldman Sachs, the Lehman Brothers and Morgan Stanley. Following this, he moved to JPMorgan Chase in 2000 and 5 years later was named CEO. He is one of the few bankers to become a billionaire during his time in banking. He attended Harvard School of Business which has a median GMAT score of 730. With countless achievements and successes in the banking industry we are sure that he excelled during his program at the Ivy league school. Our guess: 760

Check out our MBA Titans on the Forbes List article next. 

Read more
Posted on
13
Oct 2020

The Online GMAT Experience-from preparation to post MBA 

by Apex GMAT

Contributor: Ilia Dobrev

 

Advancements in technology, combined with constraints caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, have prompted the GMAT world to adapt by shifting a large portion of the exam and preparation materials online. Both test takers and tutoring firms have seen positive outcomes from interactive learning aids, an abundance of resources, and easily accessible networks of people at different stages of the GMAT journey. However, the transition has also introduced some hazards concerning physical test endurance, focus, and anxiety. This article evaluates risks and challenges you may encounter taking the online exam and summarizes everything you need to know to be ready for your online GMAT experience.

The Online GMAT Exam

Since the onset of the pandemic in the spring of 2020, the General Management Admissions Council (GMAC) has introduced an innovative, completely online version of the physical GMAT test. This allows test takers to maintain social distance by sitting for the exam from the comfort of home.

As of late July, 2020, at the time of writing, anyone can schedule an online exam before December 31, 2020. In order to accommodate candidates’ availability, appointments are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 24 hours before an available time slot. Note that the online GMAT exam is not available in Mainland China, Cuba, Iran, North Korea, and Sudan due to local data privacy regulations.

Differences from the regular GMAT exam

  • The GMAC has determined that the Quantitative, Verbal, and Integrated Reasoning sections are the most relevant for graduate business education. Therefore, the Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA) has been excluded from the online GMAT test.
  • The duration of the online test is shorter–2 hours and 45 minutes compared to 3 hours and 23 minutes. This time frame includes a 15 to 30 minutes tutorial to  familiarize candidates with the online proctored platform and all its functions.
  • Online, you will not be able to choose the order of the sections. The sequence is fixed as follows: Quantitative, Verbal, and Integrated Reasoning.
  • You can use a physical whiteboard, the built-in online whiteboard, or both for note taking. 

If you’re planning to use a physical white board, there are several requirements it must fulfil: it should be no larger than 12×20 inches (30×50 centimeters), use up to 2 dry erase markers and 1 dry erase whiteboard eraser. Items such as whiteboards with grids, background colors, or other markings, paper, pen, pencil, permanent marker, tissues (paper towels, napkins), whiteboard spray, chalkboards, writing tablets, and others are not permitted.

During the online exam, test takers will be able to access an online board from the icon. It contains an endless canvas to take notes on, which eliminates the need to erase your work as you progress through the sections.

  • In contrast to the two optional breaks in the regular exam, the online GMAT allows candidates to opt for only one 5-minute break before the Integrated Reasoning section.
  • Official GMAT scores are available on mba.com within 7 business days of completing the exam.
  • Another perk of the online GMAT experience is that it allows applicants to send scores to an unlimited number of institutions free of charge.
  • The online GMAT fee is $200, compared to the original $250 cost for the physical exam.
  • The online test cannot be retaken for any reason except a verified technical issue or authorized retakes.

Similarities with the regular GMAT exam

  • The online GMAT consists of the same Quantitative, Verbal, and Integrated Reasoning sections. Despite excluding the Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA), each of the other three sections contains the same number of questions as before–31, 36, and 12 respectively. In terms of timing, there are no alterations–the sections take 62, 65, and 30 minutes.

online GMAT breakdown

  • To ensure that GMAT scores are compatible and comparable across the online and test center-based versions, the online version adopts the same scoring algorithm. This means that both exams are equally replaceable with one another. 
  • Validity remains the same – 5 years.

Online GMAT Preparation, Tips & Tricks

As the online exam practically covers the same content, regular GMAT preparation remains relevant. If you are trying to figure out which prep method (self, group, or one-on-one) suits you best, you can check out the Four Ps of the best GMAT Prep. Apex’s GMAT tutors and custom-made curriculum are tailored to meet the needs for an online learning environment by providing private GMAT tutoring and nurturing constant feedback.

From a technical viewpoint, it is important to get used to the online whiteboard tool. It is available in all of GMAC’s Official Practice Exams, where anyone can practice all its functions in a simulated, timed environment. Keep in mind that you are not permitted to use touchscreens, graphics tablets, or stylus pens. And lastly, before starting the online GMAT exam, you can do a system test before to ensure your computer meets the operational requirements.

Read more
gmat percentile rankings aticle
Posted on
06
Oct 2020

GMAT Percentile Rankings: Demystified

by Apex GMAT

Contributor: Ilia Dobrev

The GMAT exam is an important part of the admissions process for over 7,000 business programs worldwide. GMAT performance is widely regarded as one of the best predictors of not only high academic honors, but also long-term career success. Achieving an excellent GMAT score and ranking in the top percentile is the first stepping stone in anyone’s journey to a prestigious business career.

The competitive admissions environment surrounding top tier universities has resulted in a 10-20% acceptance rate. This corresponds with percentile rankings in specific sections: for example, the GMAT Quant. But what do percentile rankings really mean?

This article describes the relationship between GMAT scores and respective percentile ranking, both in terms of individual sections and as a whole.

How do GMAT scores translate into GMAT percentiles?

According to the GMAC, two-thirds of test takers from all over the world score between 400 and 600. GMAT scores also translate into a percentile ranking. A number indicating the percentage of test takers at or below a given score. Percentile rankings are determined by comparing scaled Quant and Verbal scores (which can range from 6 to 51) to your peers’ scores. For instance, if you scored in the 90th percentile, that means that just 10% of all examinees outscored you. It’s important to note that the percentiles are recalculated every summer. This means that the current percentile rankings are likely different from the previous year’s rankings. 

The GMAC considers a sample size of test takers tracked since January 2017 to calculate percentiles. Until the beginning of 2020, a total of 695,794 GMAT exams were taken and scored, with a standard deviation of slightly above 116. Consequently, the GMAC shares average percentiles rankings for each of the four sections:

 

  • Quantitative: 36%
  • Verbal Reasoning: 45%
  • Integrated Reasoning: 33%
  • Analytical Writing Assessment: 19%

 

While these numbers seem low, applicants need to score well above the average to earn a spot in the most competitive business schools.

GMAT Scoring Grid

GMAT percentile rankings

How have percentile rankings changed by section?

Over the years, there is a trend towards increasing average GMAT scores and, consequently, percentiles have risen, too. In particular, the GMAT Quantitative percentiles have become considerably more competitive and increasingly important for MBA admissions. As more and more test takers master the GMAT quant section, it gets harder to score in a high percentile. 

One reason may be that as the GMAT’s worldwide popularity increases, non-native English speakers coming from math-proficient countries such as China and India make up a large proportion of the GMAT test takers. On the other hand, the GMAT Verbal section remains rather challenging–a score of 40 out of 60 ranks in the 90th percentile. The increasing representation of non-native English speakers might also help explain why the verbal section remains challenging. 

In any case, balanced percentile refers to the combined result of your scores on the Verbal and Quant sections.

What about the AWA and IR?

The Analytical Writing Assessment and Integrated Reasoning sections are scored separately. They also have their own scoring scale, independent from the 200 to 800 scale used to evaluate Quant and Verbal. A strong performance on the Analytical Writing Assessment and Integrated Reasoning sections can boost your admissions chances. Nevertheless, we recommend that applicants prioritize ranking in the top percentiles in the Quant and Verbal sections.

What do GMAT Percentiles mean for admissions to B-schools?

While most business schools don’t have a straightforward cutoff for GMAT results, the majority of admissions committees consider both percentile rankings and total scores. 

Top-tier institutions like Wharton, Stanford, INSEAD, and MIT are known to perform more in-depth analyses of candidates’ total scores compared with percentile rankings. These programs value exceptional scores, but place additional weight on how competitive candidates are compared with their peers. During particularly competitive admissions cycles, the most selective business schools only consider candidates who scored above the 90th percentile. Admissions decisions entail a more holistic selection process in which committees consider work experience, former education, motivation letters, resumes, recommendations, and other factors that signal applicants’ potential for success in the business world.

If you want to get into the right business program, it’s a smart move to familiarize yourself with the yearly data reports that most business schools produce regarding their current students’ GMAT scores and percentiles. 

Boosting your GMAT score

Depending on your score goals, current level of preparation, and anticipated exam date, you can opt for one of three GMAT prep options that will best suit your needs, budget, and learning style. If you’re aiming for a 700+ score, a professional GMAT tutor might provide the guidance you need to leverage your strengths and weaknesses. This could ultimately put you on the path to degree and career success. 

Read more
Featured Video Play Icon
Posted on
25
Sep 2020

GMAT & MBA Updates – Sept 2020

Hi everybody!

Welcome back to the Apex GMAT channel. My name is Natalie and today I’m going to be speaking to you about the latest MBA admissions and GMAT updates.

Should You Submit A GMAT Score With Your MBA Application?

So today I want to start out by speaking about the fact that due to the coronavirus pandemic some MBA programs have waived their GMAT requirements from the application process, including some top schools such as the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business. Now this may seem exciting and make the process a little less daunting but I wouldn’t pack away my GMAT prep materials just yet. Remember that the GMAT speaks to your critical reasoning and creative problem solving skills, which are vital to success in any MBA program so applying without this score means that you are limiting the amount of information that admissions officers see. And therefore not fully representing your skills in your application.

Not to mention the fact that other applicants will have their GMAT score in their applications having taken it from before the pandemic in test centers or during the recent months with the online version of the GMAT. Additionally, if you have a weaker part of your application such as a lower GPA then having a high GMAT score can help offset this and make you more competitive. So as you are thinking about your application and your GMAT scores place within that application it’s best to keep these points in mind.

Should You Take The Online GMAT Exam? – Online GMAT Updates

Now you might be thinking – the online GMAT exam?? Do I really want to take it? And when it first came out there were some concerns. Granted there still are but the GMAC has been working to improve and adapt the exam. Just recently announcing that candidates are able to take the test twice instead of just the previous one time. This will provide extra flexibility for candidates to improve their GMAT score in the second sitting if the first sitting was not representative. Additionally, some extra changes to the whiteboard options improves test taker experience.

So that’s all that I have for you today. I hope that it was really helpful. Please leave any questions or comments below and I’d be happy to respond to them. Also if you want to speak about your GMAT prep or MBA applications please feel free to reach out to us on our website and we’d be happy to give you some advice.

Have a great GMAT prep day.

Read more
Featured Video Play Icon
Posted on
17
Sep 2020

Which Is The Greatest – GMAT Problem

Today we’re going to look at a GMAT problem that screams for estimation but can really tie you in knots if you don’t have the right pivot question, the right perspective. Of the following which is greatest? And on its surface this would seem like a straightforward question except of course the GMAT being the GMAT they’re going to give you a bunch of numbers that are going to be hard to interpret. One part of this problem is simply training. The square root of 2, the square root of 3, the square root of 5. These are common, especially root 2 and root 3 because we see them a lot on triangle problems.

Get Familiar With Identities

And knowing these identities by heart as an estimate is really, really valuable just for being able to get a bearing whether you’re on a geometry problem and you’re trying to navigate or make sure that your answer seems correct or if you’re in a problem like this knowing these identities root 2 is 1.4, root 3 is 1.7, root 5 is 2.2 is useful as a touchstone.

Break Down The Problem

But this problem in general and the greater problem can be broken down not by saying oh well this is 1.4, this is 1.7, but by asking ourselves well logically which is bigger which is smaller. Remember it’s a multiple choice exam and they’re asking for the biggest or the smallest or whatever it is but these are opportunities to compare not nail down knowledge and this attitude is exceptionally vital for the data sufficiency but it crops up in problem solving a lot more than people might care to admit.

Especially if you’ve been there just trying to study and study and study and get to a precise answer on a lot of these things. So, let’s start just by taking a look at a few things. First square root of three square, root of two which one’s larger? If you said root three you are correct. How much larger? That might be a little bit more difficult to ascertain but if you say 1.7 versus 1.4 maybe 20 percent larger 3 is 50% larger than 2 so root 3 is going to be some smaller percentage larger than root two. But either way we know that root three is the bigger one it’s going to be the dominant value so the question becomes how much larger? Or which part of the answer drives the answer choice?

What Do We Know?

So we know that the integers 2 and 3 are more meaningful, larger than the square roots because the square roots are components of those integers. So between A and B, a drives the question that is the three drives the root two more than the two drives the root three. We can take a look at the following two and notice that both of them are around root three.

That is if we take apart the ugly part, which is the square root and take a look at the rest of it – four over five, five over four, these numbers are about one and compared to the two root three we have and the three root two which we’ve already decided is even stronger we don’t really need to entertain C and D all that much. Just to understand that oh they’re about a root three and that’s not going to be enough.

Looking At Answer Choice E

Finally, we have E. E is a little funky but we can ask ourselves how many times will root 3, will this 1.7 go into 7 and we get this answer that it’s a bit below 4. Compared with 3 root 2 which is 4.2 (3 times 1.4), we still have a driving the answer. You guys see how this is a marriage of doing a little bit of estimation but also really keeping your framing as is this greater or less than. Now we’ve included a bunch of other different answer choices here for you to take a look at play around with it and see if you can get yourself familiar with comparing these things because the GMAT is only going to come at you with things like square roots that are unfamiliar.

So it’s a fairly defined GMAT problem in that sense. I hope this helps, questions below, like us, subscribe, keep checking in and we’ll see you again real soon.

If you enjoyed this GMAT problem, try these problems next: Probability problem, and the Speed Distance problem.

Read more