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Posted on
31
Mar 2021

Ace GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions with this Science Fair Problem

Data Sufficiency Problem Video Transcript

Introduction to Data Sufficiency

Hey guys! Today we’re looking at the Science Fair Problem. In this Data Sufficiency, we’re being asked how many, discrete number, of the 900 students at the school attended all three days. And we can surmise that they’re going to come at us by giving us different breakdowns of how different groups of students behaved and so most likely we’re going to need more than one piece of information to come together in order to give us the precise amount. The only way, typically, that we would have a single piece of information be sufficient is if they gave us the inverse and told us how many, or what percentage, or what fraction of students didn’t attend on all three days. Where we could then compute the opposite.

Statement 1

Let’s take a look: Number 1 is telling us that 30% or 270 of the students attended two or more days. If we break this up into a chart, we see this block that’s undefined but we know that 270 attended either two days or three days. Some mix of them, but we don’t know that mix. Therefore, this doesn’t give us what we need from the box and it’s insufficient. However, we could use it possibly with other information that distinguishes between the two day visitors and the three day visitors.

Statement 2

Number 2 gives us relative information based upon some other number: 10% of those that attended at least one day. That means of all those that attended at all, for one day, for two days, for three days, 10% of those belong in the three-day box. However, we don’t know how many students that is. So 2 is insufficient. When we try and combine them notice that the information from 2 slices and dices a piece of information that 1 doesn’t give us. There’s no way to reconcile the 10% from that big group into the group that just attended two days or three days. Therefore, we don’t have enough information.

Answer

The answer choice is E: both together are still insufficient. Hope this helped. Guys thanks for watching! For other examples of DS problems where you can make charts to fill in the blanks and find the square you need check out the links below and we’ll see you again soon.

If you enjoyed this Data Sufficiency problem video try this Standard Deviation Problem

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Posted on
24
Mar 2021

Standard Deviation Problem On The GMAT (Normative Distribution)

Standard Deviation 700+ Tips

Hey guys! Today, we’re going to take a look at a standard deviation problem. And standard deviation is a concept that only comes up infrequently on the GMAT. So it’s more important to have a basic understanding of the concepts associated with it than to go really deep. This is true largely for much of the statistics, probability, and combinatorics problems. They show up infrequently until you get to the higher levels and even when you’re at the higher levels, relative to the algebra, arithmetic and even the geometry problems, they play such a small role.

And yet there’s so much math there that it’s very easy to get caught up in spending a lot of time prepping on problems or on these types of math that offer very little in return relative to spending your prep time really mastering the things that come up frequently. I’m not saying don’t learn this stuff I’m saying balance it according to its proportionality on the GMAT. As a general rule you can assume that stat, combinatorics and probability, all that advanced math, constitutes maybe 10 to 15% of what you’ll see on the GMAT. So keep that in mind as you prep.

Problem Language

In this problem the first step is to figure out what the heck we’re actually being asked for and it’s not entirely clear. This one’s written a little bit in math speak. So we have a normal distribution which doesn’t really matter for this problem but if you studied statistics it just means the typical distribution with a mean m in the middle and a standard deviation of d which they tell us is a single standard deviation. So they’re really just telling us one standard deviation but they’re saying it in a very tricky way and they’re using a letter d. If it helps you can represent this graphically.

Graphical Representation

Notice that they tell you something that you may already know: that one standard deviation to either side of the mean is 68 in a normal distribution. This breaks up to 34, 34. But they’re asking for everything below. The +1 side of the distribution. Since the m, the mean is the halfway point, we need to count the entire lower half and the 34 points that are in between the mean and the +d, the +1 standard deviation. This brings us to 84 which is answer choice D. This is primarily a skills problem, that is, you just need to know how this stuff works. There’s no hidden solution path and the differentiation done by the GMAT here is based upon your familiarity with the concept. Rather than heavy-duty creative lifting as we see on so many other problems that have more familiar math, that everyone kind of knows.

I hope this was helpful. Check out below for other stat and cool problem links and we’ll see you guys next time. If you enjoyed this GMAT Standard Deviation problem, try this Data Sufficiency problem next.

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Posted on
17
Mar 2021

Sequence Problem on the GMAT

Key Information to Know About Sequences

Hey guys! When we see sequences on the GMAT whether in the problem solving or the data sufficiency section they have two important characteristics. One is how they work, the other is anchoring the sequence to a particular set of numbers. Let’s start by taking a look at the most basic sequence out there. Counting! The way counting works is that every time we go up a term in the sequence we add one and if we take number one as our first term then the term number and the value move in tandem. First term is 1. Second term is 2, 50th term is 50. We could also anchor it differently. Let’s say we wanted to say the first term is five, then the second term is six, third term is seven, fourth term is eight, so on and so forth.

Play around with this: do it with the even numbers or the odd numbers and try different anchor points. Sequences can seem more complicated than they are because we don’t think of them in this basic sort of way and because they’re expressed oftentimes with weird notation. So when we see some sequence with a little number below, it that’s called a Subscript. That tells you the number of term of the sequence that they’re talking about. So going back to our counting example, S1 the first term in the sequence equals 1. S2 equals 2, S sub 3 equals 3. If we were doing the even numbers starting at two S sub 1 equals 2, S sub 2 equals 4, S sub 3 equals 6, S sub 10 equals 20. So don’t get freaked out by the notation just because it looks like it comes out of some very crazy math book.

What We Need

The problem we’re going to look at today is asking us for the value of a specific term within a sequence and the what do we need comes in two parts. We need both how the sequence works and we need to know (not necessarily where it starts) but some anchor point to tell us what some term is relative to the sequence so we can figure out any other term above or below that. We’re going to say that again: we don’t need the beginning or ending term, just any term with a specific value that along with the rules allows us to get to any other place in the sequence.

Which Statement to Begin With

Generally, when we are looking for two pieces of information we should be attuned to looking for a (C) or an (E) answer choice but that’s not always the case. If we dive into the introduced information, we’ll start with number 2 and the reason is that it’s going to be easier to evaluate. At first glance it’s simpler and you always want to start out with the easier piece and work your way up. Number 2 gives us a term. It gives us the first term, but we don’t know how the sequence works therefore it’s insufficient. Number 1 gives us the 298th term and describes how the sequence works so we’re getting both pieces together in number 1.

Answer

Therefore (A) 1 alone is sufficient. Notice here that because we’re primed for (C) / (E) answer choice, looking for two pieces of information, the GMAT is betting that we think to ourselves hey I need the first term in this sequence and the 298th term doesn’t tell me anything. They’re looking for us to answer (C) that we need them both. But once you understand sequences you’ll never fall for it. Hope this helped guys, check out other sequence problems below and we’ll see you again soon.

If you enjoyed this GMAT sequences video, try your hand at this Ratio problem next.

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Posted on
10
Mar 2021

GMAT Ratio Problem – Mr. Smiths Class

GMAT Ratio DS Problem

Expressing Different Notations

Hey guys!

Expressing different notations is often challenging when you’re first starting out on the GMAT and by different notations mean percentages fractions decimals ratios. We learn all these separately and we tend to of them as separate systems of math when in fact they’re all different expressions of the same math. One half is no different from 0.5 is no different from 50 percent there are different ways of the same thing.

Breaking Down The Problem

In this problem all their testing is our ability to shift notations. We’re being asked what the ratio, keyword ratio, is between boys and girls in the or what do we need is just that a ratio it’s fairly straightforward. So they’re probably going to come to us with weird information that doesn’t quite look like a ratio. The big thing to note before we dive in is that when we’re being asked for a ratio. In fact, when we’re being asked for any sort of relative notation, fractions, percentages, anything that needs a base that is compared to a whole. We don’t need precise numbers.

Possible ways to solve this problem

So this leaves us open either to run scenarios if we want to or to deal entirely in the relative. So we’re looking for an expression of that ratio in a non-ratio sort of language. Number one tells us there are three times as many boys and girls. We can run a scenario with 3 boys, 1 girl, 75 boys, 25 girls, but we’re being given that ratio. It’s being expressed in language rather than with the term ratio or with the two dots : in between but it’s still a ratio. So it’s sufficient!

What Did You Miss?

Correction!! Number one states there are three times as many girls as there are boys. Why do we leave that error in? To point out that here it doesn’t matter. We’re not looking to determine whether the ratio is 1 boy to 3 girls or 3 girls to 1 boy or 3 boys to 1 girl. The only thing that matters, the threshold issue on this problem, is getting to a single specific ratio. What that is or in this case even reversing the boys and girls doesn’t matter because it’s a referendum on the type of information that we have. The moment we have a quantitative comparison of boys and girls coming from number one we know that number one is sufficient. Being able to have flexibility and even focus on the more abstract thing you’re looking for sometimes leads to careless errors on the details though and this is important. Many times those careless errors don’t matter, freeing yourself up to make those and understanding that you don’t have to manage the nitty-gritty once you have the big abstract understanding is very important.

Looking at Statement No. 2

Number two goes fractional, telling us that 1/4 of the total class is boys. We can break that into a ratio by understanding that a ratio compares parts to parts whereas a fraction is part of a whole so one out of four has a ratio of one to three. If this isn’t immediately obvious, imagine a pizza and cut it into four slices. One slice is one quarter of the total pizza the comparison of the one slice to the other three slices is the ratio one to three so if you get one slice and your friends get the other ones. The ratio of your slice to the others is 1:3. You have 1/4 of the total so two is also sufficient. Therefore, the answer choice here is D.

Hope this helped guys! Practice this skill of going in between these different notations because it’s one that pays off in dividends. Check out the links below for other problems and we’ll see you again real soon.

If you enjoyed this GMAT Ratio DS Problem, try your hand at this Triangle DS Problem.

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Posted on
17
Feb 2021

Data Sufficiency: Area of a Triangle Problem

Hey guys! Today we’re checking out a geometry Data Sufficiency problem asking for the area of a triangle, and while the ask might seem straightforward, it’s very easy to get caught up in the introduced information on this problem. And this is a great example of a way that the GMAT can really dictate your thought processes via suggestion if you’re not really really clear on what it is you’re looking for on DS. So here we’re looking for area but area specifically is a discrete measurement; that is we’re going to need some sort of number to anchor this down: whether it’s the length of sides, or the area of a smaller piece, we need some value!

Begin with Statement #2

Jumping into the introduced information, if we look at number 2, because it seems simpler, we have x = 45 degrees. Now you might be jumping in and saying, well, if x = 45 and we got the 90 degree then we have 45, STOP. Because if you’re doing that you missed what I just said. We need a discrete anchor point. The number of degrees is both relative in the sense that the triangle could be really huge or really small, and doesn’t give us what we need. So immediately we want to say: number 2 is insufficient. Rather than dive in deeply and try and figure out how we can use it, let’s begin just by recognizing its insufficiency. Know that we can go deeper if we need to but not get ourselves worked up and not invest the time until it’s appropriate, until number 1 isn’t sufficient and we need to look at them together.

Consider Statement #1

Number 1 gives us this product BD x AC = 20. Well here, we’re given a discrete value, which is a step in the right direction. Now, what do we need for area? You might say we need a base and a height but that’s not entirely accurate. Our equation, area is 1/2 x base x height, means that we don’t need to know the base and the height individually but rather their product. The key to this problem is noticing in number 1 that they give us this B x H product of 20, which means if we want to plug it into our equation, 1/2 x 20 is 10. Area is 10. Number 1 alone is sufficient. Answer choice A.

Don’t Get Caught Up With “X”

If we don’t recognize this then we get caught up with taking a look at x and what that means and trying to slice and dice this, which is complicated to say the least. And I want you to observe that if we get ourselves worked up about x, then immediately when we look at this BD x AC product, our minds are already in the framework of how to incorporate these two together. Whereas, if we dismiss the x is insufficient and look at this solo, the BD times AC, then we’re much more likely to strike upon that identity. Ideally though, of course, before we jump into the introduced information, we want to say, well, the area of a triangle is 1/2 x base x height. So, if I have not B and H individually, although that will be useful, B x H is enough. And then it’s a question of just saying, well, one’s got what we need – check. One is sufficient. Two doesn’t have what we need – isn’t sufficient, and we’re there. So,

I hope this helped. Look for links to other geometry and fun DS problems below and I’ll see you guys soon. Read this article about Data sufficiency problems and triangles next to get more familiar with this type of GMAT question.

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Posted on
14
Jan 2021

Averages Problem No.1 : Test Averages

Hey guys, today we’re going to take a look at the test averages problem. This is a very straightforward mathematically oriented average problem or at least it can be. But there are very strong graphic solution paths here and there’s also a really strong sort of intuitive running tally counting solution path here. We’re going to start out with the math though, just because that’s how a lot of people are familiar with this problem. Before we jump into the heavier duty quicker sort of stuff. 

Doing the Math

So to solve this problem we want to take an average. But one of the components of our average is missing. So we have four things with an average of 78, and a fifth unknown. That means we can assume that each of the first four exams were 78. So we’ve got 4 times 78 plus X over 5. The total number of exams is going to give us our average of 80. Then through algebra, algebraic manipulation we multiply the 5 over, we get 400 equals 4 times 78 plus x. The 4 times 78 is 312. We subtract that off the 4 and that brings you to 88. Answer choice E.

Graphic Solution Path: Poker Chips

Let’s take a look at this a little differently. One of the ways I like looking at averages is imagining stacks of poker chips and you can have stacks of anything. I like poker chips because they fit together and you can make two stacks equal very easily so what we’re being told here is we have four stacks of 78 a fifth unknown stack but if we equalize them all that is if we take chips off of the unknown stack and distribute them all the stacks will be 80. That means that the fifth stack needs to be 80 and then it needs two poker chips for each of the other four stacks to bring those 78’s up. We can also envision this as just a rectangle our goal is 80 but we have 78, and our goal is five tests but we have four so we have 78 by four here. And then 80 by 5 here what’s missing is the full 80 and then 2 on each of four stacks of 48.

Running Tally Method: Intuitive Approach

The most powerful way to handle this problem though is probably by doing a running tally. Don’t even worry about the visualization but rather notice that, I’ve got 47 8s each of those are too short so I’m two, four, six. eight points short on the last test. I need to get the 80 that I want plus those eight points that I’m short bringing us to 88. And anybody who’s sweated like A+, B+, A- or a C+, B- has done this math. So if you characterize it like that a lot of times it becomes much more intuitive and once again allows you to cultivate confidence for a deeper treatment and more complex averages problems and mean problems check out the snack shop problem, check out the company production problem and there’s a great ds problem that we do the trade show problem you’ll find links to all of them just below and I hope this helped. 

 

Enjoyed this Averages Problem ? Try another type of GMAT problem to get familiar with all question types on the exam: Remainder Number Theory Problem.

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Posted on
14
May 2020

The Effects of Coffee on GMAT Performance

Let’s talk about caffeine and the effect of coffee on GMAT performance. Caffeine is a neuro-stimulant. Drinking coffee or tea while you prep and particularly being appropriately caffeinated when your test is a decided advantage. Caffeine is a nootropic, which means it helps you be smarter. It also helps your cognitive abilities become enhanced due to increased blood flow and oxygen flow to the brain.

Find Your Right Amount

It’s important to understand how much caffeine helps, not just to wake you up in the morning. More than that, it’s about how much caffeine is needed to get you to that a really nice steady state of alert focus-ness (where you’re making up words like alert focus-ness) where you kind of feel on top of the world and you have that gentle energy.

You want to understand exactly how much caffeine your body can take because there’s nothing worse than being over caffeinated, jittery and anxiety ridden on the exam. But if you calibrate it properly caffeine is an important part of your GMAT diet.

If you enjoyed the Effects of coffee on GMAT Prep, watch: Why a 4.0 does not equal GMAT success. 

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Posted on
25
Mar 2020

GMAT Videos: Will They Help Improve My Score?

You most likely navigated to this video after watching some other GMAT videos. If you’re self-prepping by watching a lot of GMAT videos I’ve got some bad news for you. It’s a very low yield way to prep, especially if you’re doing it to the exclusion of other things.

Passive Learning

Now we have plenty of videos up here: some informational, many problems, testimonials, all kinds of stuff. It’s not that they don’t have a role in your preparation.

However, if you’re spending a lot of your prep time on a regular basis watching videos then what you’re engaging in is passive rather than active learning. Again, that’s a very low yield way to learn. That’s the most generous explanation. A realistic explanation might be that you’re using these videos, going around YouTube, looking at different platforms, as a way to feel like you’re making progress. Especially if you’ve been prepping for a long time without a measurable result or if you’ve hit a plateau.

This idea of doing more, engaging more, watching more videos, doing more problems, seems like a really good idea because that’s worked for you in the past. But in fact what you’re doing is self-medicating the psychological anxiety of either not improving or having to put forth meaningful effort & work to change the way you’re approaching the GMAT.

Change Your Approach to Watching GMAT Videos

The good news is there’s a solution for this and it doesn’t mean that you need to stop watching videos. When you’re watching GMAT videos you should be then taking a step back and practicing what you’ve learned. Changing what you’ve learned to see if it’s really sunk in or if you’re really just feeling forward momentum because you’re spending time exposed to the GMAT.

This is sort of a kin to feeling smarter because you carry books around, if you never read the books. You know the book, you know the title and you know the author. If you don’t know what’s inside or you have the story memorized but you don’t know the meaning behind it, the symbolism, why the author wrote it, then you can’t really be said to know the book.

Problem Identification Is Only Half The Work

The GMAT is the same way. It’s very easy to convince ourselves that we’re making progress. Or that we’re proficient by saying “oh yeah that’s a work rate problem. That’s a data sufficiency problem which is a system of equations”. And use that anchor of identification as a way to say I know this when in fact it’s a very surface level understanding.

In order to get to a deeper level, you need to not only recognize what you’re looking at but be able to respond to it in a new and interesting way.

What you need to be able to do is not just recognize the problem when you’re looking at those types of problems but recognize them within the general universe of other types of problems that you’re looking at. Just like when you’re sitting in the exam. A core skill is being able to not just recognize the problem but also have a good idea of what to do when you encounter that type of problem.

A work rate problem, to take this example further isn’t a particular problem, it’s a category of problems. Depending upon the way they introduce this problem determines what solution paths, what avenues of approach are going to be the most useful, the most time-efficient and depending on your learning style the most intuitive for you. The skill that you really want to grow in watching GMAT videos is using them as a basis in order to have a better sense of what you ought to be doing. That is, develop the skill of decision-making in an unknown environment not just identification.

Continue to Watch GMAT Videos

As you continue to watch videos keep this in mind but if you’re sitting there just watching video after video, frankly you’re wasting your time. Be sure to take a step back and ensure that you’re able to not just replicate what you’ve seen done in a video but to understand when it’s appropriate to use it and be prepared to do so in a less confined, less predetermined setting. I hope that is helpful and it’s not designed to make you feel bad about what you’re doing but to enhance what you’re doing. I’ll see you guys next time.

If you enjoyed this video watch: How to Avoid Stupid Mistakes on the GMAT.

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