2 Types Of GMAT Prep Videos
Posted on
14
Oct 2021

2 Types Of GMAT Videos That You Should Include In Your Prep

As everything is shifted online due to the recent global events, students have had to find ways to prepare for the online GMAT exam from the comfort of their own homes. The good news is that they no longer need to sit down and read books and guides to excel at the GMAT. Times have changed and there are now so many handy sources that can help you succeed. And now more than ever, people are including GMAT videos in their preparation strategy and are relying on them as sources for information and different solution paths.

GMAT Prep Videos

GMAT prep videos are especially important for visual learners who tend to learn better by looking at the information presented to them. Watching videos as part of the learning process has proven to be a good approach that definitely improves the learning experience for most students. Videos are also more time-effective as you get to access and absorb information in a shorter period of time. However, one thing to be mindful of is not to focus only on videos while preparing for the exam, as other mediums can offer just as much information as a video does.

GMAT prep videos can prove to be very helpful if they are utilized in a moderate way and are a great way to give you insights on what to expect on the exam day. They usually come in 2 main types and we will tell you more about how to utilize them in this guide: 

Problem Videos

The first type of GMAT prep video is the problem video. These usually include solved examples and problem-solving strategies. They aim to show you concrete examples and clear illustrations of how best to look at the problem and solve it in an efficient manner. If you are struggling with probability or combinatorics problem types, videos explaining these will aid you in the problem-solving process.

One such example is this video where Mike, our Head of Curriculum, explains in detail the solution path for a Percentage Problem commonly found in the GMAT exam. He goes into detail about the process of coming up with a solution to the problem and discusses every single answer choice in order to give you a better understanding of how to tackle the problem and how to get to the correct answer.

Another GMAT video to look out for is the Strategies video where you’re presented with different strategies and some best practices that you can use to go about a certain type of problem on the GMAT exam. These videos can really come in handy, especially because they are more generalized and you can easily use the approach shown on the video for a lot of problems you come across. Here’s an example of a strategy video, where Mike explains the best ways to approach a Data Sufficiency problem in the GMAT.

GMAT Advice

The second type of GMAT prep video that you can utilize to help you with your preparation are GMAT advice videos.

Generally, experience videos give you a better perspective of what to expect on exam day. Here’s an experience video where you are given more information about the online GMAT and how to go about taking it.

Another type of GMAT advice video to watch out for is the testimonial videos. These include actual test-takers’ testimonials and you’ll get to hear more about other people’s experience with certain aspects/sections of the exam. That way, you can definitely find ones that you can relate to and use to your own advantage. This is David’s testimonial where he discusses working with ApexGMAT and how that improved his score immensely. 

Key Takeaways

It is clear now how essential GMAT prep videos can be when it comes to your preparation. 

But there is one last thing to keep in mind: do NOT use these GMAT videos as your only source to help you with your prep. They can be especially helpful as they cover different topics in a short amount of time, but they can never replace detailed guides and actual practice.

Contributor: Altea Sulollari

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Posted on
18
Aug 2021

GMAT Prime Factors Problem – GMAT Quant

Hey guys, check out this problem. This is an example of a problem that requires daisy-chaining together or linking together several key algebraic insights in order to answer it.

GMAT Prime Factors Problem - GMAT Quant

GMAT Prime Factors Problem – Applied Math Solution Path

Notice there’s an applied math solution path. We want prime factors of 3⁸ - 2⁸, and it’s just reasonable enough that we can do the math here. And the GMAT will do this a lot, they’ll give us math that’s time-consuming, but not unreasonably time-consuming in order to just draw us into an applied math solution path. We’ll take a look at this really quickly.

3⁸ is the same as 9⁴.
3⁸ = 3²*⁴= (3²)= 9
9 = (9 * 9)² = 81²
81 * 81 = 6,561

9 * 9 is 81² – about 6,400 or if we want to get exact, which we do need to do here because we’re dealing with factors, 81 * 81 is 6,561. Don’t expect you to know that, it can be done in 20 seconds on a piece of paper or mentally. And then 2⁸, that one you should know, is 256. And then, 6,561 – 256 = 6,305.

So now we need to break down 6,305 into prime factors. You know how to do that using a factor tree, so I’m going to zoom us right into a better solution path because I don’t want to give away the answer.

GMAT Prime Factors Problem – Another Solution Path

Notice that 3⁸  and 2⁸ are both perfect squares so we have the opportunity to factor this into (3– 2) * (3 + 2). Once again, the first term is a difference of two squares, the second term we can’t do anything with. So we break down that term, and lo and behold, (3² – 2²) * (3² + 2²) * (3 + 2), and once again we can factor that first term out into (3 + 2), (3 – 2), and so on. We work these out mathematically, and they’re much easier and more accessible mathematically, and we get 3 – 2 = 1 which obviously is a factor of everything. 3 + 2 = 5, 3² + 2² = 9 + 4 = 13, and then 3 + 2⁴ = 81 + 16 = 97.

So now we’ve eliminated everything, except B and C, 65 and 35. This is where the other piece of knowledge comes in. Since we have factors of 5 and 13. 65 must also be a factor because it’s comprised of a 5 and a 13. 35 requires a 7. We don’t have a 7 anywhere, so the correct answer choice is C, 35. 

GMAT Prime Factors Problem – Takeaways

So the big takeaways here are, that, when provided with some sort of algebraic expression like this, look for a factoring pattern. And, when it comes to prime factorization, remember, that if you break it down into the basic prime factor building blocks, anything that is a product of those building blocks also exists as a factor.

Hope this helped and good luck!

Found it helpful? Try your hand at this GMAT problem, GMAT Prime Factorization (Anatomy of a Problem).

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Posted on
11
Aug 2021

GMAT Markup Problem – GMAT Data Sufficiency

Hey guys, today we’re going to take a look at a typically characteristic data sufficiency problem that gives us a relationship, and then asks us if we have enough to compute the final value of that relationship. There’s an algebraic solution path here, where they give us the equation and we need to see if we have all but one of the variables, that final variable being the one that they’re asking for. We can also do this via parts, scenario, and graphically, and we’ll take a look at all those as well.

GMAT Markup Problem Introduction

GMAT Markup Problem

This problem describes to us the relationship between the selling price, the cost, and the markup. And notice that, while we’re going to sketch it out here, the actual relationship doesn’t matter to us – all that matters is that if they’re asking for one term in terms of the rest if we have the other terms, that’ll be enough.

Algebraically we have selling price S equals the cost C plus the markup M. So this is giving us the markup in, let’s say dollar terms, whereas we might also set this up as selling price equals cost times one plus the markup percentage. And here we just have that notational shift. So, what we’re looking for, if we want to know the markup relative to the selling price, is an understanding of it either relative to the selling price or relative to the cost. That is, these two things are associated and the markup, when associated with the cost, gives us a ratio. Where the markup, when associated with the selling price, is a fraction. And if you’ll remember notationally these things are expressed differently, but conceptually there’s the same math behind it.

Statement 1

Number one gives us in percentage terms the mark up compared to the cost. So, here we can see it as 25% more and this is where it ties into that second version of the algebraic one we just looked at. The cost we can break up into four parts of 25% so that when we add the markup that’s a fifth part. Therefore, the markup comprises one-fifth or 20% of the selling price.

Statement 2

Number two provides us a concrete selling price but doesn’t tell us anything about the markup or the mix of cost versus markup as a percentage of the total selling price. Two is insufficient on its own, and as we’ve seen in many other data sufficiency problems, what they’re trying to do here is fool us into thinking we need a specific price, a discrete value to get sufficiency. When the question stem is asking us only for a relative value and when we’re being asked for a relative value, a percentage, a fraction, a ratio be on the lookout for fooling yourself into thinking that you need an anchor point a specific discrete value.

I hope this helps. If you enjoyed this GMAT Markup Problem, try your hand at this Triangle DS Problem.

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Posted on
28
Jul 2021

GMAT Trade Show Problem – Data Sufficiency

GMAT Trade Show Problem Introduction

Today we’re going to take a look at the Trade Show Problem and this is a GMAT Data Sufficiency problem with averages as the focal point. But really the concept of average is distracting from this problem. So, if we take a look at the question stimulus, we want to figure out what we need, but we need to synthesize some of the information there to understand what we know.

We’re being asked whether or not it gets above a certain threshold an average of 90, and over six days that’s going to be over a total of 540 points. Notice how I did it mathematically, you can represent it graphically as a rectangle, but 90 times 6 is that 540 points. We know though that all of our days at a minimum are 80 which means we can build up from that piece of knowledge. We have 80 x 6 = 480 points and we want to know if we have more or less than 60 points above that minimum that we’re already working with that’s what we need.

Solving the GMAT Problem

Ways we might get it include any number of slices and dices for the performance of the rest of the days and the difficulty of this problem in large part will be dependent on how convoluted the GMAT gives us the introduced information on number one and two.

When we look at number one, we’re told that the final four days average out to a hundred. Once again, like with other average problems, each of the individual four days the performance doesn’t matter. We can just say each is exactly 100 and make that assumption, which means each is 20 over – we’re 80 points over the mean. Because we want to know whether we are more or less than 60 points, this knowledge that we’re 100 points tells us “Yes, definitively. We are over that average of 90, we’re over that surplus of 60 points.” So, number one is sufficient.

Number two gives us the opposite information, it talks about the minimum, and, in aggregate, that doesn’t let us know directly whether or not we make those 60 points. That is it’s possible but it’s also possible that we don’t, because we’re dealing with a minimum rather than a maximum or rather we’re dealing with information that can lie on either side of what we need. Therefore 2 is insufficient. Our answer here is A.

I hope that was useful. GMAT nation stay strong, keep averaging. You guys got this! I believe in you. If you want to test your GMAT Data Sufficiency skills, check out the Science Fair problem.

 

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Posted on
21
Jul 2021

GMAT 3D Geometry Problem – GMAT Math – Quant Section

GMAT 3D Geometry Problem 

In this problem we’re going to take a look at 3D objects and in particular a special problem type on the GMAT that measures the longest distance within a three-dimensional object. Typically, they give you rectangular solids, but they can also give you cylinders and other such objects. The key thing to remember about problems like this one is that effectively we’re stacking Pythagorean theorems to solve it – we’re finding triangles and then triangles within triangles that define the longest distance.

This type of problem is testing your spatial skills and a graphic or visual aid is often helpful though strictly not necessary. Let’s take a look at how to solve this problem and because it’s testing these skills the approach is generally mathematical that is there is some processing because it’s secondary to what they’re actually testing.

gmat 3d geometry question

GMAT 3D Geometry Problem Introduction

So, we have this rectangular solid and it doesn’t matter which way we turn it – the longest distance is going to be between any two opposite corners and you can take that to the bank as a rule: On a rectangular solid the opposite corners will always be the longest distance. Here we don’t have any way to process this central distance so, what we need to do is make a triangle out of it.

Notice that the distance that we’re looking for along with the height of 5 and the hypotenuse of the 10 by 10 base will give us a right triangle. We can apply Pythagoras here if we have the hypotenuse of the base. We’re working backwards from what we need to what we can make rather than building up. Once you’re comfortable with this you can do it in either direction.

Solving the Problem

In this case we’ve got a 10 by 10 base. It’s a 45-45-90 because any square cut in half is a 45-45-90 which means we can immediately engage the identity of times root two. So, 10, 10, 10 root 2. 10 root 2 and 5 makes the two sides. We apply Pythagoras again. Here it’s a little more complicated mathematically and because you’re going in and out of taking square roots and adding and multiplying, you want to be very careful not to make a processing error here.

Careless errors abound particularly when we’re distracted from the math and yet we need to do some processing. So, this is a point where you just want to say “Okay, I’ve got all the pieces, let me make sure I do this right.” 10 root 2 squared is 200 (10 times 10 is 100, root 2 times root 2 is 2, 2 times 100 is 200). 5 squared is 25. Add them together 225. And then take the square root and that’s going to give us our answer. The square root of 225 is one of those numbers we should know. It’s 15, answer choice A.

Okay guys for another 3D and Geometry problem check out GMAT 680 Level Geometry Problem – No Math Needed! We will see you next time.

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Posted on
14
Jul 2021

GMAT 680 Level Geometry Problem – No Math Needed!

GMAT Geometry Problem

Hey guys, top level geometry problems are characterized typically by stringing a whole bunch of different rules together and understanding how one thing relates to the next thing, to the next thing. Until you get from the piece of information you started with to the conclusion. We’re going to start out by taking a look at this problem using the z equals 50° and seeing how that information goes down the line.

top level geometry problem

But afterwards we’re going to see a super simple logical pathway utilizing a graphic scenario that makes the z equals 50° irrelevant. To begin with we’re being asked for the sum of x and y and this will come into play on the logical side. We need the sum not the individual amounts but let’s begin with the y. We have a quadrilateral and it has parallel sides which means the two angles z and y must equal 180°. That’s one of our geometric rules. If z is 50° that means y is 130° and we’re halfway there.

Next we need to figure out how x relates and there are several pathways to this. One way we can do it is drop. By visualizing or dropping a third parallel line down, intersecting x, so on the one hand we’ll have 90 degrees. We’ll have that right angle and on the other we’ll have that piece. Notice that the parallel line we dropped and the parallel line next to z are both being intersected by the diagonal line going through which means that that part of x equals z. So we have 50° plus 90° is 140°. 130° from the y, 140° from the x, gives us 270°.

Another way we can do this is by taking a look at the right triangle that’s already built in z is 50° so y is 1 30°. now the top angle in the triangle must then be 180° minus the 130° that is 50°. it must match the z again we have the parallel lines with the diagonal coming through then the other angle the one opposite x is the 180° degrees that are in the triangle minus the 90° from the right triangle brings us to 90° minus the 50° from the angle we just figured out means that it’s 40° which means angle x is 180° flat line supplementary angles minus the 40° gives us 140° plus the 130° we have from y again we get to 270°.

Graphic Solution Path

Now here’s where it gets really fun and really interesting. We can run a graphic scenario here by noticing that as long as we keep all the lines oriented in the same way we can actually shift the angle x up. We can take the line that extends from this big triangle and just shift it right up the line until it matches with the y. What’s going to happen there, is we’re going to see that we have 270° degrees in that combination of x and y and that it leaves a right triangle of 90°, that we can take away from 360° again to reach the 270°.

Here the 50° is irrelevant and watch these two graphic scenarios to understand why no matter how steep or how flat this picture becomes we can always move that x right up and get to the 270°. That is the x and y change in conjunction with one another as z changes. You can’t change one without the other while maintaining all these parallel lines and right angles. Seeing this is challenging to say the least, it requires a very deep understanding of the rules and this is one of those circumstances that really points to weaknesses in understanding most of what we learn in math class in middle school, in high school. Even when we’re prepping only scratches the surface of some of the more subtle things that we’re either allowed to do or the subtle characteristics of rules and how they work with one another and so a true understanding yields this very rapid graphic solution path.

Logical Solution Path

The logical solution path where immediately we say x and y has to be 270° no matter what z is and as you progress into the 80th, 90th percentile into the 700 level on the quant side this is what you want to look for during your self prep. You want to notice when there’s a clever solution path that you’ll overlook because of the rules. Understand why it works and then backtrack to understand how that new mechanism that you discovered fits into the framework of the rules that we all know and love. Maybe? I don’t know if we love them! But they’re there, we know them, we’re familiar with them, we want to become intimate. So get intimate with your geometry guys put on some al green light some candles and I’ll see you next time.

If you enjoyed this problem, try other geometry problems here: GMAT Geometry.

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Posted on
13
May 2021

GMAT Factors Problem – 700 Level GMAT Question

GMAT Factors Problem

Hey guys! Today we’re going to take a look at one of my favorite problems. It’s abstract, it’s oddly phrased and in fact the hardest part for many folks on this problem is simply understanding what’s being asked for. The difficulty is that it’s written in math speak. It’s written in that very abstract, clinical language that if you haven’t studied advanced math might be new to you.

How this breaks down is they’re giving us this product from 1 to 30, which is the same as 30!. 30*29*28 all the way down the line. Or you can build it up 1*2*3*……*29*30.

The Most Difficult Part of The GMAT Problem

And then they’re asking this crazy thing about how many k such that three to the k. What they’re asking here is how many factors of three are embedded in this massive product. That’s the hard part! Figuring out how many there are once you have an algorithm or system for it is fairly straightforward. If we lay out all our numbers from 1 to 30. And we don’t want to sit there and write them all, but just imagine that number line in your head. 1 is not divisible by 3. 2 is not divisible by 3, 3 is. 4 isn’t. 5 isn’t. 6 is. In fact, the only numbers in this product that concern us are those divisible by 3. 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27, 30.

Important Notes About Factors

Here it’s important to note that each of these components except the three alone has multiple prime factors. The three is just a three. The six is three and a two. The nine notice has a second factor of three. Three times three is nine and because we’re looking at the prime factors it has two. It’s difficult to get your head around but there are not three factors of three in nine when you’re counting prime factors.

Three factors of three would be 3 by 3 by 3 = 27. So notice that 3 and 6 have a single factor. 9 has a double factor. Every number divisible by 3 has one factor. Those divisible by 9 like 9, 18 and 27 are going to have a second factor and those divisible by 27, that is 3 cubed, are going to have a third factor. If we lay it out like this we see ten numbers have a single factor. Another of those three provide a second bringing us to thirteen. Finally, one has a third bringing us to fourteen. Answer choice: C.

GMAT Problem Form

So let’s take a look at this problem by writing a new one just to reinforce the algorithm. For the number 100 factorial. How many factors of seven are there? So first we ask ourselves out of the 100 numbers which ones even play? 7, 14… 21 so on and so forth. 100 divided by 7 equals 13. So there are 13 numbers divisible by 7 from 1 to 100. Of those how many have more than one factor of 7? Well we know that 7 squared is 49. So only those numbers divisible by 49 have a second factor. 49 and 98. There are none that have three factors of 7 because 7 cubed is 343. If you don’t know it that’s an identity you should know. So here our answer is 13 plus 2 = 15.

Try a few more on your own. This one’s great to do as a problem form and take a look at the links below for other abstract number theory, counting prime type problems as well as a selection of other really fun ones. Thanks for watching guys and we’ll see you soon.

If you enjoyed this GMAT factors problem, here is an additional number theory type problem to try next: Wedding Guest Problem.

 

 

 

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Posted on
23
Apr 2021

Standard Deviation – Clustering (Birds) Problem

Hey guys! Today we’re going to take a look at a DS problem that is a skills problem, focused on GMAT standard deviation.

Standard Deviation & Variance

What they’re asking here is do we have enough information to compute a standard deviation? It’s useful to think of standard deviation as clustering. If we have a whole series of points we can define how clustered or un-clustered the group of points is. That’s all that’s standard deviation, that’s all that variance is. So if we have all the points that works. What we should be on the lookout here for are parametric measurements. Especially things like the average number is, because while the average can be used to compute standard deviation, we need to know how each of the points differs from the average. But if we have each of the points we always get the average. That is, we can compute the average. So the average is a nice looking piece of information that actually has little to no value here. So let’s jump into the introduced information.

Statement 1

Number 1 BOOM – tells us that the average number of eggs is 4 and that’s great except that it doesn’t tell us about the clustering. If we run some scenarios here we could have every nest have 4 eggs or we could have 5 nests have 0, 5 nests have 8, or 9 nests have 0, 1 nest has 40. These are all different clusterings and we could end up with anything in between those extremes as well. So number 1 is insufficient.

Statement 2

Number 2: tells us that each of the 10 bird’s nests has exactly 4 eggs. What does this mean? We have all 10 points. They happen to all be on the average, which means the standard deviation is 0. that is there’s no clustering whatsoever. But 2 gives us all the information we need so B – 2 alone is sufficient is the answer here.

Hope this was useful guys, check out the links below for a video about how to compute standard deviation as a refresher, as well as other problems related to this one. Thanks for watching we’ll see you again real soon

If you enjoyed this GMAT problem, try another one next: Normative Distribution

 

 

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Posted on
14
Apr 2021

GMAT Percentage Problem – Unemployment Rate – Multiple Solution Paths

GMAT Percentage Problems

Hey guys, GMAT Percentage problem/s are commonplace on the GMAT and today we’re going to take a look at one that is straightforward but could very easily get you caught up with the math. In this problem, notice that there’s the word “approximately.” That always means there’s an Estimation Solution Path. We’ll take a look at that first but then we’re going to look at a Scenario Solution Path, which for many people is a lot more natural. In addition to seeing that word approximately you can see that there’s this massive spread within the answer choices. Once again pushing us towards an Estimation Solution Path.

Estimation Solution Path

So let’s dive in: The unemployment rate is dropping from 16% to 9% and your quick synthesis there should be: okay it’s being cut about in half or a little less than half. And monitoring that directionality is important. Additionally, the number of workers is increasing. So we have lower unemployment but a greater number of workers. So we have two things, two forces working against one another. If the number of workers were remaining equal then our answer would be about a 50% decrease or just under a 50% decrease, so like 45% or something like that. But because we’re increasing the number of workers, our decrease in unemployment is lower. That is we have more workers, so we have a larger number of unemployed so we’re not losing as many actual unemployed people and therefore our answer is B: 30% decrease.

Scenario Solution Path

If we want to take a look at this via Scenario, we can always throw up an easy number like 100. We begin with 100 workers and 16% are unemployed so 16 are unemployed. Our workers go from 100 to 120. 9% of 120 is 9 plus 0.9 plus 0.9 = 10.8% or 11%. What’s the percentage decrease from 16 to 11? Well it’s not 50, that’s too big. It’s not 15, that’s too small. It’s about 30 and the math will bear us out there.

So thanks for watching guys! Check out the links below for other GMAT percentage problem/s and we look forward to seeing you again real real soon.

Another GMAT percentage problem

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Posted on
08
Apr 2021

GMAT Factorial Problem: Estimation & Scenario Solution

GMAT Factorial Introduction

Factorials and divisibility, together. Two mathematical kids from opposite sides of the tracks, they come together and fall in love and they create this problem. Here we’re asked what numbers might divide some new number 20 factorial plus 17. As a refresher, a factorial is simply the number times each integer below it. So in this case, 20! is equal to 20 x 19 x 18 …. x 3 x 2 x 1. It’s a huge number. And it’s not at all possible to process in GMAT time. What we want to notice about any factorial is that it has as factors every number that it contains. So 20! is divisible by 17, it’s divisible by 15, it’s divisible by 13, 9, 2, what have you and any combination of them as well.

What The GMAT is Counting On You Not Knowing

When we’re adding the 17 though, the GMAT is counting on the idea that we don’t know what to do with it and in fact that’s the entire difficulty of this problem. So I want you to imagine 20! as a level and we’re going to take a look at this graphically. So 20! can be comprised by stacking a whole bunch of 15’s up. Blocks of 15. How many will there be? Well 20 x 19 x 18 x 17 x 16 x 14 times all the way down the line. There will be that many 15’s. But 20! will be divisible by 15. Similarly, by 17, by 19, by any number. They will all stack and they all stack up precisely to 20! because 20! is divisible by any of them.

Answer

So when we’re adding 17 to our number all we need to see is that, hey, 15 doesn’t go into 17, it’s not going to get all the way up there. 17 fits perfectly. 19? guess what? It’s too big and we’re going to have a remainder. So our answer here is B, only 17.

For other problems like this, other factorials, and what have you, please check out the links below and we will see you next time. If you enjoyed this GMAT problem, try your hand at this Science Fair Problem.

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