Posted on
05
Jul 2022

Overcoming Focus Issues on the GMAT

We are sure that there have been occasions when you were ready to study but found yourself thinking about everything else besides what you were supposed to do. Lack of focus is a common problem that each of us has to face and find a way to deal with. GMAT is an examination that requires a lot of concentration as you have to shift from one topic to another for 3 and half hours. Maintaining your focus is not a suggestion but a necessity while preparing for and taking the exam. In this article, we are going to look at some useful tips on how to deal with the lack of focus for the GMAT.

Set Proper Studying Environment

Most of us have a preferred studying environment that is tailored to our needs and requirements and ensures personal comfort. For some of us, this may be studying on the bed with the music on and snacks, and for others, studying in a group with friends at a cafe. However, on exam day, you won’t have these “luxuries.” Instead you will be required to sit at a bare desk for more than 3 hours. Not having your conveniences may affect your concentration negatively and consequently, deteriorate your GMAT performance. 

One way to avoid this is to prepare yourself at home for the exam in similar conditions to the ones on the exam day itself. For example, instead of studying on your bed, choose a chair and table set up. You should also try to minimize your distractions as much as possible- turn off the music, leave your phone away, don’t let people come into the room where you are studying, etc. The more similar your studying environment is to the exam environment, the higher your chances are to be focused and work well when taking the GMAT exam.

Create Your Personalized Study Plan for GMAT Preparation

The key to a successful GMAT performance is efficient preparation, which follows a well-organized study plan with clear timetables and goals. If you plan to take the GMAT, start your preparation by creating a study plan. You may use an online planner tool or even better, talk with a professional who can help you to develop a study strategy for your prep schedule.  

Having a GMAT prep schedule can also help you on the exam day itself. Once you have it, you can put time limits for each section of the exam and determine whether it takes you too long to finish a particular question or section. This could be a sign that you aren’t focused on the exam and that you have to quickly overcome the distractions. If you learn the signs of being distracted, you can practice overcoming your lack of focus on the GMAT. 

Set Up a Routine

Besides having a study plan or prep schedule, you may want to consider creating a day-to-day schedule or routine and organizing your tasks. Sometimes it can be overwhelming to balance between work, studying for the GMAT, social life, and all other responsibilities. This often leads to an irregular schedule of studying, which works against the quality of study time. Your body follows a biological clock, meaning your mind functions best or to its full capacity at particular periods of the day. If you don’t set certain times to study, you can often find yourself more easily distracted and lose your focus for the GMAT by thinking of everything else you have to do during the day.

If you want to utilize your time effectively and study better, create a routine, organize your tasks, and give yourself time to relax. You have to devote a sufficient amount of time for your preparation, separate from your personal or professional commitments’ time. Importantly, you should also give yourself time to rest and procrastinate freely so as not to lose your sanity while preparing for GMAT. Go for a walk, take a nap or watch your favorite series. 

Additional Tip 

Study in bursts. Don’t force yourself to study for 4 hours straight. This won’t be a productive learning session as you and your brain have a limit to how much new knowledge you can handle. Instead, try dividing your study time into 20-25 min chunks, interspersed with 5 min breaks. When you are engaged with intense mental activities such as studying or preparing for the GMAT exam, it is critical to take breaks. This method can help you stay focused since you know that the next break is just around the corner, so you have to get motivated, roll up your sleeves and finish your task.

Conclusion

Preparing for and taking the GMAT exam is a challenging endeavor and maintaining your focus is an essential requirement for success. You should find your own ways to stay focused and create a study plan that is suitable for you and your needs. Here at Apex, we are more than happy to support you on your GMAT journey and assist you in every step of the process. You can sign-up for a 30-minute complimentary consultation call with one of our instructors who can help you develop your personalized GMAT prep schedule!

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Posted on
29
Jun 2022

GMAT vs LSAT

Deciding to do a master’s degree is not easy for anyone. Actually, it is a pretty daunting and lengthy process to achieve one. If you’re reading this, chances are you are considering the process. This article compares two of the most common standardized tests — the GMAT and the LSAT. 

Firstly, let’s do a short breakdown analysis of each of the exams. 

The GMAT

The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is a post-graduate entrance exam for those who wish to do an MBA. The test consists of four sections and takes about three hours to complete. The score ranges from 200-800.

Most of the best business schools require a high score on the GMAT. For example, to be able to get into a prestigious business school, it is best to score a 700+. 

The LSAT

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is also a post-graduate entrance exam but specifically made for law school. The LSAT is the only way that you can be admitted to a law school and pursue a degree in it. 

The LSAT has three sections and lasts for three and a half hours. The score for the LSAT ranges from 120 to 180, and most top law schools prefer scores over 170.

The Differences and Similarities of the GMAT and LSAT 

The GMAT includes problem-solving, decision-making, and analytical questions. It tests skills which you will need during your MBA. On the other hand, the LSAT will test you more on reasoning, logic, reading, and writing – great skills needed for future lawyers!  

Both the GMAT and the LSAT have a section on reading comprehension that has more or less similar types of questions. Reading Comprehension is the most basic section for all standardized tests. On top of that, both have analytical and writing sections. The writing section is a single essay in both of the exams that require the test taker to write on a certain topic. The other sections of both tests differ.

As mentioned before, the GMAT is more heavily based on analytical and problem-solving questions, meaning that it also contains a lot of math in its questions. The LSAT, on the other hand, does not include any math. The exam mainly tests the test-takers’ reasoning and verbal skills. However, LSAT does have a section called “Analytical Reasoning” which may feel like math because it is based on logic. The LSAT has a verbal section called “Logical Reasoning Questions” which is similar to GMAT’s “Critical Reasoning” section. The latter is seemingly more difficult.

The differences in the sections are timing and demand. The LSAT is said to have more arguments that specifically want to test your ability. The GMAT, on the other hand, adapts to your performance during the exam and continues the questionnaire that way. The GMAT is more focused on testing quantitative and qualitative skills which are essential for effective functioning in the business world. In comparison, the LSAT has more reading and writing sections since law school is a heavily qualitative field which requires extensive reading and interpreting.  

Conclusion

In conclusion, you should first try to understand which degree sounds more suitable and enjoyable to you so that you go into it wholeheartedly. Other than that, it is helpful to know that both the GMAT and the LSAT have similarities in their sections and both of them are post-graduate entrance exams that are a requirement to get into any business or law school.

Contributor: Sarin Sulahian

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Posted on
28
Jun 2022

3 Most Common GMAT Mistakes Made During the Exam

The GMAT is a unique type of exam that tests a broad area of knowledge as well as various skills such as time management, working well under pressure, and strategy building. You will be given a relatively short amount of time to answer each question, and you need to be well aware of how you should approach each type of question. You may already feel that many things can go wrong during the exam. While it is normal to make mistakes, being prepared for the exam by knowing  potential exam “traps” will help you deal with any unexpected situations. One of the best ways to prepare for such situations is by learning from others’ mistakes. Thus, we’re going to walk you through some of the most common GMAT mistakes that test-takers make during the exam and give our advice on how to avoid them.

1. Memorized Answers 

A common GMAT mistake that test takers make while preparing for the exam is memorizing the questions and answers from the practice exams rather than understanding and learning from each question. This strategy is pretty useless as the same exact questions from the practice tests will NOT  repeat on the official GMAT exam. Also, this strategy is prone to causing real problems to test takers during the exam since they (most probably) will have a limited array of techniques to use to tackle different question types. 

Keep in mind that you have about 2 min per question. Because of this you should have a strategy and logical method of tackling and solving each question type before the exam takes place. During your GMAT preparation, you should understand the question types and what you are required to do on each of them. The questions from each section have aspects to them which can be tricky to understand at the beginning. If you find yourself struggling to understand  questions and solution paths you can always look for professional help. For example, private GMAT tutors are people who have extensive experience when it comes to taking – and studying for – the GMAT. A proper private GMAT tutor can give you valuable advice on how to avoid common mistakes on the different GMAT sections.

2. Wrong Time Strategy

As the GMAT is a time-constrained exam, having the right time strategy is crucial during the exam. Knowing that they are pressed for time, many students tend to allocate their time wrongly which negatively affects their performance. Having a short amount of time to answer each question means it may be tempting to look for shortcuts to save time. For example, many students try to save some extra time by scanning questions in order to get a rough understanding of what is being asked. In this way, they believe they will have more time to analyze the option choices and  find the right answer faster. Unfortunately, this strategy rarely yields the expected results because students get stuck between 2-3 choices, meaning they will have to re-read the question. Hence, answering just one question will take more time than they had anticipated. 

The remedy for this common GMAT mistake is a combination of a proper timing strategy and a proper approach for solving different types of questions. Instead of looking for ways to solve the question for the least possible time and compromising the accuracy of your answer, try to find the right approach to solve the question. Having the right approach means that you will spend just the right amount of time. While preparing for the GMAT exam, pay enough attention to problem solving methods as well as the time you take to solve each question. 

3. Refusing to Admit You Don’t Know Something

Another common GMAT mistake hides in the students’ inability to admit that they don’t know the answer to a particular question. Instead they attempt to guess the answer. This is, of course, an action of last resort. Nevertheless, it’s naive to think that even if you have studied for hundreds of hours, you will know the answer to every question. Keep in mind, the GMAT exam is not designed for you to answer every single question right. The GMAT test has a computerized adaptive format, meaning it employs a special algorithm to adjust to your level of proficiency as you progress through the questions. It will give you several easy, intermediate, and hard questions, and you have to try to give an answer to all of them.

Instead of agonizing over a few questions and wasting valuable time trying to solve them, you have to take your best educated guess and move on. Otherwise, you are losing your chance of getting other questions correct. It is far more important to get through the entire exam rather than to answer every question correctly. Your score will be calculated collectively from all questions and it won’t be determined only by the questions that you don’t know. Show what you have learned and don’t worry if you can’t answer all the questions.

Conclusion

The GMAT is a challenging exam because it hides many potential traps that can easily mislead test-takers who, under pressure, often make careless mistakes. You should understand that making mistakes is normal and be prepared to make some yourself. Here at Apex, we are more than happy to support you on your GMAT journey and assist you in every step of the process. You can sign-up for a 30-minute complimentary consultation call with one of our instructors who can help you ace your exam and learn strategies to avoid GMAT mistakes!

 

Contributor: Diana Materova

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Posted on
06
Jun 2022

GMAT In-Person or Online? Pros and Cons

As you consider your options for taking the GMAT, you probably have considered the question “Which one would work better for me: GMAT in person or GMAT online?” The GMAC has recently announced changes to the GMAT exam, including giving test takers the option to take the exam online.

Which is better for you, GMAT in person or GMAT online? There are pros and cons to both, and it ultimately depends on your personal preference and situation. Here are some key factors to consider when making your decision.

Pros of Taking the GMAT Online 

Flexibility

The best part about taking the GMAT online is that you can take the test from any place that has an internet connection. This is a major plus for people who cannot travel or do not live near a physical GMAT testing center. Also, the online format allows more flexibility in terms of scheduling. You can choose to take the exam at any time that works for you as long as you comply with certain time frames.

Taking the Test in the Same Environment You Studied in 

If you are taking the GMAT exam at home, the setting will be similar to the one you studied and practiced in for this test. Taking the exam in an environment that’s already familiar to you means that your mind will be more comfortable with its surroundings which can reduce anxiety. Studying for the GMAT and taking the exam in the same place will help your mind connect the material you studied with the setting in which you’re taking the test.

Test Anxiety 

For some test takers, the thought of taking a test in person can be very anxiety-provoking. If you are one of these people, then taking the GMAT online may be a better option for you. You can take the GMAT from the comfort of your own home and avoid any potential stress that comes with being in a physical testing location.

Cons of Taking the GMAT Online 

Less Personal Attention

When you take the GMAT online, you do not have direct contact with a proctor. You both will be able to communicate through the chat, and you can ring to live chat with the proctor. Still, this can be a disadvantage if you prefer receiving more personal attention or want your questions to be answered faster, in more detail, or prefer face-to-face explanation. 

Security

Some people may feel less secure about taking an online test, especially if they haven’t taken any online exams before. Make sure you are familiar with the GMAC security procedures for online testing before signing up and the steps you need to complete before starting the exam.

No Scratch Papers  

One thing you cannot do when taking the GMAT online is to take notes physically. But you do have the virtual whiteboard or you can buy your own whiteboard to use during the exam. This can be a disadvantage if you like to have physical copies of all your materials in front of you during the test. Also, proctors are very strict when it comes to what you have around you. You are not allowed to have anything on your table, including pens, calculators, or coffee. Literally, nothing should be around you.

Pros of taking the GMAT in Person  

Environmental Distractions are Eliminated  

If you are someone who is easily distracted by your surroundings, then taking the GMAT in person may be a better choice for you. This setting allows you to have more control and eliminates any potential environmental distractions. You don’t know when you might receive an unexpected mail or notifications on your laptop.

Live Feedback from the Proctor 

Another advantage of taking the GMAT in person is that you can get live feedback from the proctor. If you have any questions or concerns during the test, the proctor can help to address them faster and maybe better than through a chat box online. 

Cons of Taking the GMAT in Person  

Location and Scheduling

The main disadvantage of taking the GMAT in person is that you are limited to location and schedule. You may not be able to find a test center close to you, or the testing times may not work with your schedule.

Cost

The GMAT costs $250, and the cost of taking it in person can add up if you have to travel.

Similarities: GMATin Person or GMAT Online  

Both the online and in-person versions of the GMAT are computerized, so you will get the same questions and experience. Also, both GMAT online and in person will be 3 hours and 7 minutes and you will be given two optional 8-minute breaks, plus you will be able to choose the sequence in which you take the test. Both exams cost US $275. So if you are concerned about potential errors that could occur in a live test environment, rest assured that GMAT in-person and online are equally accurate.

Technology Requirements for the GMAT Online  

In order to take the GMAT online, you must meet certain technical requirements. You will need either a PC or Mac that operates on Windows 8.1 or 10 or Mac OS 10 or above, Windows 7 will not work. You need to have a computer with internet access, a webcam, and a microphone. If you do not have these items or are unable to meet the requirements, you will have to take the GMAT in person.

Which Option is Best for You  

Ultimately, the decision of whether to take the GMAT in person or online comes down to personal preference. If you are comfortable with technology and don’t have a flexible schedule, then the GMAT online option may be better for you. However, if you prefer more personal interaction or want feedback from a proctor, then the GMAT in person option is best. Keep in mind that you always have the option to hire a GMAT private tutor to help guide you with your studies and everything related to the GMAT. No matter which format you choose, make sure to prepare well so that you can score your best on test day.

Contributor: Cynthia Addoumieh

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Posted on
01
Jun 2022

GMAT Success: How to Utilize Breaks During the GMAT

One of the most ignored parts when thinking about the GMAT is taking a break during the test itself. Most standardized tests from the SAT to the Multi-State Bar Exam offer the test-takers the option to take breaks. The GMAT does the same. Constantly we harp over GMAT testing strategies and different study methods for our GMAT Success and we put a massive amount of emphasis on the test day itself. But we never seem to mention the breaks that can be taken during the GMAT.

1. How Long is the GMAT?

You are probably well aware of the structure of the GMAT at this point, but here is a reminder anyway. The GMAT is a grueling 3 hours and 7 minutes and is divided into four sections, integrated, quantitative, and verbal reasoning, along with the analytical writing assessment. The verbal and quantitative sections are especially a pain, with both being over an hour and filled with highly demanding questions.

1.Integrated Reasoning: 30 mins, 12 questions 

2.Quantitative Reasoning: 62 mins, 31 questions 

3.Verbal Reasoning:  65 questions, 36 questions 

4.Analytical Writing Assignment: 30 mins, 1 question

During the GMAT exam, you are allowed two eight-minute breaks. The first is allowed after the first hour of the exam and the second is available after the quantitative reasoning portion. Both of these breaks are completely optional, but taking full advantage of these breaks can really help keep you sane during the GMAT. 

So why should you be taking these breaks and what should you do? Below are some of our favorite suggestions when utilizing the breaks during the GMAT.

2. Importance of Taking a Break 

The GMAT breaks are optional, and you may be someone who prefers not to do so. But just keep in mind that the GMAT is over 3 hours long so it is a marathon, not a sprint. These GMAT breaks can help maximize your scoring potential. However, when taking a break do not study during it, in fact, if you study during the break your score could actually be cancelled. That’s because studying during the test time is against the rules of the GMAT. Instead, actually use your break to take a break.

3. Reduce Stress

Stress while studying for and taking the GMAT is universal and it’s not unjustified – the GMAT is an exam that could help determine your future. So of course it makes sense that many can find themselves overwhelmed during the exam. Taking a break is a great way to reset and achieve GMAT success. Even if you don’t feel completely overwhelmed, stepping away from the test is a good way to gain clarity. Taking breaks help you to broth process and retain information, further maintaining your focus. It is easy to become exhausted during the exam and for your brain to be drained.  Hence, even if you may not feel you need a break your brain probably needs one. 

4. Refuel 

Of course when taking a break during the GMAT you have a chance to eat or drink something. Something that you can prepare for yourself are healthy snacks. Fruit, granola bars, or nuts can serve as great ways to power your brain through the rest of the exam. In fact, we would recommend that the night and morning before the exam to make sure to eat something healthy. Stay away from unhealthy snacks and food as you want both your body and brain to be in the best shape for the test. In terms of drinks, water, but also maybe a thermos filled with coffee and tea will suit you well. A cup of coffee may even give you that boost you need. Once again we suggest you stay away from unhealthy drinks such as sodas and energy drinks. 

In Review 

GMAT success is a monumental task. It is a very demanding test, both in prep and during the exam itself. It is important to try and take advantage of every opportunity you can get, such as breaks during the test. Here at Apex GMAT we offer a different edge on the GMAT, that being private one on one GMAT tutoring. Private GMAT tutoring give test takers some of the best opportunities in achieving GMAT success. Apex GMAT  offers both online and in-person tutoring. It can be the first step to your desired GMAT score.

 

Contributor: Lucas Duncan

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GMAT Myths
Posted on
10
Feb 2022

Top 5 GMAT Myths Debunked

1. It’s harder than the GRE

One of the most common GMAT myths is that it is presumably more difficult than the GRE. 

In their essence, the two exams are different when it comes to their test design, structure, and scoring system. Therefore, their level of difficulty would vary depending on a person’s individual traits. It is only natural that different people will find different things easy. The important question you can ask yourself is which exam would be easier and more suitable for you

The GRE contains three sections – Analytical Writing, Quantitative, and Verbal section. The GMAT, on the other hand, contains four sections – Analytical Writing Assessment, Quantitative Reasoning, Verbal Reasoning, and an Integrated Reasoning section. 

GMAT Verbal vs GRE Verbal

GMAT vs GRE VerbalWhile the GMAT mostly tests people’s grammar and reasoning, the GRE focuses on vocabulary. If you are knowledgeable of complex words, you’ll find the GRE easier. Once again, the level of difficulty is a rather subjective issue. The GMAT Verbal section is 65 minutes while the GRE Verbal section comprises two 30-minute sections.  

GMAT Quantitative vs GRE Quantitative

The two tests contain the same math content: Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry, ‘Real-life’ problems. The difference comes from the way the math is tested. 

The GMAT is not designed to examine your ability to calculate complex mathematical operations but rather your critical thinking and logical approach to problems. To compare, the GRE tests your basic mathematical skills and understanding of concepts. Keep in mind that the GMAT is MBA-program specific. Given the MBA’s quantitative focus, there is more emphasis on that portion of the exam. The GRE, on the other hand, is meant for a plethora of graduate programs, from art history to engineering

2. Expertise in math and English is necessary

Being a proficient English speaker and having great mathematical skills will surely help you score high on the GMAT. Nevertheless, the latter are not requirements. Don’t forget that the GMAT is not designed to test your mastery in these fields but to examine your critical thinking skills. 

Since the exam is entirely in English, you need to have a good understanding of how the grammar of this language works. You should also be fluent enough not to be hindered when trying to understand what you are being asked or what a certain paragraph means. You need to be able to express yourself well when presenting an argument. Other than that, English language proficiency is not required when taking the GMAT.

When it comes to math, it is advisable to have an understanding of basic mathematical concepts like probability, combinatorics, equations, basic statistics, and manipulations with powers and roots. Still, many of the problems are high-school-level math and don’t require expertise. If you have the right approach, you can solve problems with ease

3. You need to spend a year to prepare

Dedicating a whole year to prepare for an exam seems like a daunting task for many. Luckily, it is also not necessary. This is just another misconception related to GMAT preparation. While the time one will need to master their skills is strongly individual, many candidates have achieved good results for a relatively short period of time. 

The Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC), for example, offers an 8-week study timeline for successful performance. According to the GMAC, people who performed well on the exam spent on average 3-6 months to prepare. The results of their 2016 self-reported Prospective Student Survey state that, in general, people who study more, get better results. Candidates who spent 80 hours or more preparing said they scored 600 or higher. 

Spending a long time studying won’t necessarily guarantee you a high score. Numerous factors can affect your performance. Maintaining a healthy sleep schedule, being productive, and effectively managing your time are some of them.

4. Drilling problems is the best way to prepare

Taking a diagnostic test to figure out our strengths and weaknesses and set a baseline for measuring your progress is crucial if you are a beginner. Continuously solving practice test after practice test though, won’t do you any good and is just one of the many GMAT myths for successful preparation among test-solvers. 

By drilling on GMAT problems you will lose hours of your spare time that you can otherwise use more constructively. Attempting problem after problem, without shaking things up, will most likely lead to very little improvement in the long run. 

Instead, spending time identifying strengths and weaknesses should be a part of your study plan. It is a good idea to take a look at answer explanations and eliminate unhelpful or time-consuming approaches and solution pathways. An excellent GMAT preparation also includes establishing a time management strategy and finding the right work-rest balance.

5. A 700 score is required for a top program

Debunking one of the most well-known GMAT myths is crucial for reducing anxiety among applicants. According to the official GMAC Benchmarking Tool, the mean GMAT score is 568.21, and only about 10% of the test-takers score above 700 each year.

Truth to be told, although a 700 score may be helpful for being accepted to top programs worldwide, it is not necessary. Business schools consider a variety of factors when evaluating applicants. 

While the GMAT score is an important part of the admissions procedures for graduate schools, as it allows an objective comparison between individuals, it is certainly not the only important factor to be considered. A strong application can still be reviewed even if the candidate doesn’t have a 700+ GMAT score.

Another aspect of examining GMAT results that should be taken into account is that a given score might be suitable for one business school but unsuitable for another. Thus, depending on your goals, you might need to take a look at the average GMAT scores your dream school accepts.

 

Naturally, this whole process can be much easier if you have someone who can guide you along the way, like a one on one GMAT tutor. Here at Apex, we give every potential client the opportunity of a 30-minute complimentary consultation call with a 770+ scoring instructor.

 

Contributor: Reneta Georgieva

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GMAT Memorization Techniques
Posted on
03
Feb 2022

5 Essential GMAT Memorization Techniques

Find what works for you and stick with it. There is no need to struggle mentally trying to memorize certain techniques when a simpler solution path exists. That is why our tutors at Apex GMAT are professionals in helping our clients learn tips which suit their mental and cognitive abilities. We call this, Cognitive Empathy, and it works by not forcing clients into a ‘one-size-fits-all’ box of GMAT test-prep steps. Rather, we work with our clients by tailoring our approach to their personal needs and capabilities. Here are five GMAT memorization techniques we share with our clients. 

1. Memorize the answer layout

Some question types have the same responses. On the GMAT, answers to the  Data Sufficiency Questions are presented in the same way. These being: 

A) Statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2) alone is not sufficient.
B) Statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (1) alone is not sufficient.
C) Both statements TOGETHER are sufficient, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient.
D) EACH statement ALONE is sufficient.
E) Statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are NOT sufficient.

As a test prepper, you can memorize these statements, given they remain the same throughout the entire GMAT. We suggest memorizing a more simple form of these answer types. For example: 

A) Only Statement 1
B) Only Statement 2
C) Only Both Statements together
D) Either statement
E) Neither statement 

By using this as a memorization technique it will cut down on the time you spend on the test. You won’t need to reread the answer types each time you come in contact with them.  

2. Practice the vocabulary in everyday life

This may sound simple, but trust, this GMAT memorization technique helps! The vocabulary section of the GMAT is tricky, and often people use flashcards to help them memorize terms and concepts. While this is useful, we found that to really engrain the meaning of these words it is best to use them in practice. Decide on a handful of words that you find difficult in their meanings and commit to using them throughout the day or week. This will help you structure the word within a sentence, and learn to use the word properly. Keep a notebook of the most difficult terms and revert back to it as your vocabulary grows! 

3. Use Acronyms and Mnemonics

Struggling with remembering math concepts and equations? The quantitative portion on the GMAT can seem daunting, especially if you are a couple of years out of school and don’t recall some basic math formulas. We understand this, which is why we avoid using math on the GMAT all together! But sometimes, the best path is the most direct. Remember some basic math equations and formulas using the following tricks: 

  • Simple Interest Formula
    • Interest = principal x rate x time 
    • I = prt 
    • Remember the equation as: I am Pretty! 
  • Distance Formula 
    • Distance = rate x time
    • D = rt
    • This equation can be remembered as the word: dirt
  • Linear Equation
    • Y = mx + b 
    • B for begin / M for move 
    • To graph a line, begin at the B-value and move according to the m-value (slope) 
  • Multiplying Binomials 
    • (x – a)(x + b) 
    • Remember FOIL for the order: 
      • First
      • Outside
      • Inside
      • Last 
  • Order of Operations
    • When answering an equation which looks something like this: 7 x (4 / 6) + 2 = remember: PEMDAS or Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally 
    • Parentheses 
    • Exponents 
    • Multiplication
    • Division
    • Addition
    • Subtraction 

4. Apply a visual meaning to things 

While studying, look at what is around you and apply meaning to objects. If you are working on a particular math problem, stare at the radiator in your room. Then, during the exam (if you are taking the GMAT online), look at the radiator if you come in contact with a similar problem. This trick will help your brain in remembering what you learned while studying. If you are taking the GMAT onsite, consider pieces of clothes or jewelry which you will wear during your test. Perhaps fiddle with a ring on your finger while memorizing words, or wear a favorite sweater which you associate with certain mnemonic devices. This is a trick we give our clients, and it ends up helping them during the test! 

5. Apply the knowledge you are learning often

It is one thing to read things out of a textbook and take notes, it is a whole other thing to apply the information you are learning. Doing one or two practice questions won’t automatically make you a whiz at that particular type of problem (even if you got the answers right), but rather practicing in different situations (ie at a restaurant, while riding into work, while cooking dinner), which challenges your brain to think strategically in various situations. This prepares you for the dynamic environment of the testing facility. You can do this both with the quantitative and qualitative portions of the exam. Plus it would look extra cool if you are seen jotting math equations down on a napkin while waiting for your food at a restaurant. 

Final Thoughts

These GMAT memorization techniques may seem straightforward, but they require work. However, hard work does pay off in the long run! The amount of work you put into your studying can dictate where you end up attending school, and thus the job you receive after graduating. While you are not your GMAT, your GMAT score does play a large role in your overall application to your dream school! If you are looking for extra help in preparing for the GMAT, we offer extensive one-on-one GMAT tutoring for high-achieving students. You can schedule a complimentary, 30-minute consultation call with one of our tutors to learn more! 

 

Contributor: Dana Coggio

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GMAT Score on Resume
Posted on
28
Dec 2021

Does Your GMAT Score Belong On Your Resume?

We here at Apex get a lot of questions from our clients asking if putting their GMAT score on their resume will help them during their job search. And our answer is, it depends! For some jobs, your GMAT score can be a deciding factor for prospective employers, for others they won’t even consider your GMAT score. This can be confusing when it comes to structuring your resume during your job search. We have a standard rule of thumb here at Apex. 

Before we get to that, it is important to understand what a GMAT score is, and what it says about you.

GMAT Score – How important is it? 

The GMAT evaluates your quantitative and qualitative capabilities as well as your analytical writing skills. It tells admissions committees that you can handle the rigors of an MBA program. And in doing so, compares you against other GMAT test-takers using its percentile ranking system

GMAT Score on Resume Survey While most top business schools require GMAT scores for the admissions process, not every company does. A 2018 Graduate Management Admissions Council (GMAC) survey determined that only 6% of surveyed companies use applicants’ GMAT scores in their employee selection process. Apart from that 6%, 21% stated that though a high GMAT score may help a potential job candidate, the GMAT overall doesn’t normally play a significant role in the selection process. While the majority of companies (72%) don’t consider GMAT scores at all.

This may seem to answer your question regarding whether your GMAT score belongs on your resume. But be aware! The 6% of companies that do use GMAT scores to vet job candidates are the crop businesses in the world. All major banking, investment, and consulting firms, including Accenture and Goldman Sachs, require high GMAT scores for all positions – even internships. 

Most of these firms specialize in quantitative-intensive labor. As a result, the quantitative section tends to carry more weight. For example, if a candidate has an overall score of 680, but a quantitative score of 51, he or she has a good chance of getting an interview at a major firm.

Before deciding whether to put your GMAT score on your resume, consider the following: 

Firstly, you should only list your GMAT score on your resume if it happens to be very strong. Think, over 700+, strong. There is no need to add your score if a prospective employer questions why you were not able to score higher. 

Second, it depends on where you are applying. Employers who tend to consider the GMAT score are the same industries that value the MBA: finance, banking, consulting. When applying to any of these industries, you can be fairly sure that they will respond favorably to your GMAT score (provided you have a strong one!). 

Third, you need to consider the reason one would take the GMAT: The GMAT is a psychometric exam, it measures more than just what you know. The GMAT also measures how you think. Numerous industries have tests for prospective applicants in order to weed out those who may not be an intellectual fit in their company. That means your GMAT score will signal to the HR department that you are a strong candidate and you successfully pass the testing bar. 

Final Remarks

Ultimately, whether you add your GMAT score to the resume is up to you. It comes down to where you are applying, what your score is, and whether your potential employer has a test for prospective applicants. Not only do we help our clients achieve an elite 700+ GMAT score, but we also provide them with advice during their university and job search. If you are in the middle of studying for the GMAT and are looking for a private GMAT tutor, our elite tutors have all scored over a 770 on the GMAT and have years of professional experience with tutoring. You can meet with us for a 30-minute complimentary consultation call. To learn more about what it means to add your GMAT score to your resume, you can watch Mike explain further in this video

 

Contributor: Dana Coggio 

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Why Should You Hire The Most Expensive GMAT Tutor?
Posted on
05
Oct 2021

Why Should You Hire The Most Expensive GMAT Tutor?

By: Apex GMAT  
Date: October 5, 2021

You’ve made up your mind and have decided to hire a GMAT tutor to guide you through the process of preparing for the GMAT exam. Your goal is to get a good enough score to get accepted into your dream MBA program. But how can you decide which GMAT tutor to hire when there are so many different tutors out there? Well, we’ve got the answer for you: hire the most expensive GMAT tutor on the market. Here’s why:

You could argue that “the most expensive,” doesn’t necessarily mean the best, but in our case it actually does. Our clients’ GMAT scores are proof of that. After working with Apex GMAT, Justin managed to go from a 580 to a 710 and landed a place at the University of California’s Haas School of Business. David managed to break through the 700 mark and achieve a score of 750 on the exam, going on to attend Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business for his MBA.

Besides the hundreds of clients that we have worked with to achieve scores within the 700 range, all of our tutors have scored 770 and above on the exam. They have many years of teaching experience both outside of the GMAT and within the GMAT sphere, so they know the test in and out.  With the customized one-on-one tutoring experience that clients get from working with Apex tutors, they are sure to receive a premium service with stellar results. 

In this article, we’ll tell you more about what working with the most expensive GMAT tutors on the market can offer you and 3 reasons why you should hire him/her.

GMAT Tutoring is an Investment!

The first thing to keep in mind is that working with an elite GMAT tutor does not come at an average GMAT tutoring price. Thus, you should not be expecting an average GMAT preparation experience. From the first call with us until your successful GMAT score, admissions to B-school, and beyond, Apex tutors are there to lend a hand. Instead of thinking about your GMAT prep as a stage in the application process,  consider it as an investment in your educational journey.

If you select the correct tutor the first time around, you can actually save money on tutoring, grad school costs through scholarships, and develop relationships with mentors who will be willing to help you at any stage in your academic and professional life. Attending one of the top business schools in the world is a commendable achievement and attaining a great GMAT score can open that door for you. The only thing that will almost guarantee you that awesome score is hiring the best GMAT tutor to help you prepare and we’re here to make that happen for you.

You’ll get a Premium GMAT Tutoring Experience! 

By working with the most expensive tutors you are affording yourself the opportunity to work with experts, whose goal will be to successfully guide you through the process. You’ll also receive a higher level of expertise and personal attention than with a medium-priced service. With the personalized approach that is offered by our tutors, each tutor strives to provide clients with the most efficient and effective preparation for success. By personalizing the service to your strengths and weaknesses, you have the opportunity to improve your skills in a shorter time frame. 

Still not sure why our service is more expensive than others? For a more detailed explanation, watch this video.

How an Expensive GMAT Tutor Can Help you?

Now that you have a better understanding of what the most expensive GMAT tutor offers, here are 3 reasons why you should hire one to help you prepare for the GMAT: 

Overcoming scoring plateaus!

Working with an instructor that has many years of experience means that you are in good hands. They will have a deep understanding of the test and its structure which makes it easy for them to guide their clients to elite 700+ scores, no matter their academic background or starting GMAT score. They have worked with hundreds of clients and they will instantly know what your situation is and how to teach you for success. By using a personalized approach with every single client, they can easily pinpoint your weaknesses and will help you work on improving them. The end results are bound to be better than if you’d study on your own or prepare with a medium-priced service. In this case, the premium service you get definitely justifies the price you pay. 

They will lead the way to the top MBA programs! 

You don’t want a great GMAT score just for the sake of it. The end goal is to land a place at one of the top Business Schools out there, so that’s why nailing the GMAT exam is so essential to your future. That being said, working with instructors that have continuously worked with numerous students towards that same goal is the best way to go about it. These instructors know what each of the top MBA programs is looking for in terms of GMAT scores and how a certain GMAT score can boost your application. They will also have connections to the top programs you’re intending to apply to and will be able to give you advice on how to stand out as an applicant.

A mentor for life!

This experience won’t just provide you with an instructor that will guide you through the GMAT exam. Instead, you’ll get to nurture a relationship with a mentor who will have your back for life, mentoring you through any stage of your academic and professional journey. Use your mentors’ experience to advise you about the best business schools, the right path thereafter, job interview and pay negotiation advice, business advice, and networking for success.

Make sure to check out our top 5 GMAT tutors that operate globally and take pride in their expertise before you decide on which one to hire.

Now that you have a better understanding of the importance that the most expensive GMAT tutor has when it comes to your future, you are ready to make that decision.

Make the smart decision and invest in your future!

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7 Daily Practices For GMAT Success - GMAT Guide
Posted on
08
Jul 2021

7 Daily Practices For GMAT Success

By: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Ruzanna Mirzoyan
Date: 8th July 2021

7 Things You Need To Do Daily When Preparing For The GMAT (GMAT Guide)

  1. Visualize success and the value you will get in the end
  2. Review a the GMAT sections
  3. Set a time limit for each day
  4. Do not forget to reward yourself
  5. Forget about the target score only focus on improvement
  6. Give yourself a pep talk 
  7. Evaluate Yourself Honestly

     Achieving a great score on the GMAT exam is not an easy task. The overall preparation process is daunting for a majority of test takers, especially for non-native English speakers. It requires diligent work and a daily checklist that you need to follow. So how do you come up with a plan that works? This article covers seven tips for successful GMAT prep which will guide you throughout the entire process. Even though every individual taking the exam has different expectations, experiences and may be approaching the test in a different way, sticking to a daily routine is an integral part of test success; the most difficult thing is adhering to it, avoiding procrastination and maintaining motivation. Therefore, after learning all the exam basics, such as the timing, the sections, and the preparation materials, it is worth creating a checklist to help keep you on track.

Visualize success and the value you will get in the end

The thought of success can create happiness! Once we attain something that seemed difficult initially, the suspense wears off, and the excitement rapidly grows. By taking time every day to imagine achieving your goal you can stay motivated and on the right path. When we experience happiness our brain releases serotonin, the hormone responsible for happiness. By keeping the picture of accomplishment in our mind, this happiness never fades. Hence, if every day contains even a tiny bit of happiness, even the most complex struggles seem simpler to overcome. Whether the GMAT exam is a struggle or not, happiness and motivation are something that one undoubtedly always lacks. Do your best to look at the bigger picture and think of the steps that will expedite reaching the top.

Review the GMAT exam sections

Whether you have a private GMAT tutor or are studying on your own, be sure to review difficult parts of the overall format of the exam every day before going through your study materials, for example the data sufficiency answer choices. You may do a short quiz on quantitative, verbal, or integrated reasoning to keep pace with timing and question types. You can consider this form of revision as stretching your brain muscles before the main exercise. Doing a simple GMAT quiz each time will make you more cautious about time management and remind you about the type of questions that you may have already mastered in previous study sessions.

Set a study time limit for each day

As it is said, time is the only non-redeemable commodity, so proper allocation is a fundamental key to success. We recommend you have a specific time allocation for GMAT prep each day. That can be some time for weekday preparation and extension on the weekends. Ensure the limit you set for yourself is reasonable because procrastinating one day and doubling the hours the next day does not work out. It does not matter how many months you have on your hands; the significant thing is precise allocation. If you want to get a decent score, you must spend approximately 100-120 hours reviewing the materials and practicing. However, top scorers usually  spend 120+ hours studying. Whether you belong to the former or the latter category, remember that time is the most expensive investment you are making. At the same time keep in mind that your study-life balance should be of utmost importance. 

Do not forget to reward yourself

It is not a secret that the GMAT is burdensome and overwhelming, and preparing for it can be stressful and oftentimes disheartening. Not having small rewards to look forward to can lead to demotivation. Rewards are things that rejuvenate your broken concentration. Try something like the Pomodoro Technique. This technique helps break down time into intervals with short breaks. Instead of breaks, you can think of something ‘non-GMAT related’ that will make you regain focus. For example, by grabbing a quick snack, meditating, or walking around the house or even watching a short YouTube video. Whichever works best for you, make use of it; even brief respites retain your stamina. Finally, never forget about the bigger reward; your final score. 

Forget about the target score, only focus on improvement

GMAT preparation practices do generate plight both in physical and mental states. It is crucial to remind oneself of the improvement phases. We agree that everything you are going through is for the final score. But focusing on the final score too much can frustrate you if you are not making big leaps towards it, which in turn can be counter productive. All successful practices dictate that you should focus on one thing at a time, which improves every day until the exam day. When the exam day comes, you will utilize all the knowledge and effort to get the highest GMAT score possible. Keeping daily track of your improvements relieves some of the burden on your shoulders. Even the tiniest advantage acquired can be a game changer. For instance, finishing each section a minute earlier than before will eventually contribute to achieving more significant results on the exam day, or perfecting a solution path which has you approaching a host of GMAT problems in a more efficient manner. These small wins can be the fuel to keep you going. 

Give yourself a pep talk 

I am sure you receive a lot of support from the people surrounding you. However, self-encouragement is of the utmost importance. Look around, see what others are doing at your age and inspire yourself. Choose wisely between the tradeoffs. Such as choosing to study instead of partying. Giving yourself a daily pep talk will make you more enthusiastic about reaching your objectives. A recent scientific study has shown that talking to yourself dwindles anxiety and stress while boosting performance. This is no less true for GMAT test preparation. Give yourself motivational and instructional pep talks. This method promotes positivity as motivational talks cheer you up and keep up the eagerness to study and strive for more, while a self-instructional talk directs detail-orientation and accentuates what exactly you need to do for that particular day. For example, start every day by loudly stating what should be done for the day. It helps with thinking about the mechanisms of every individual task and visualizing methods to complete them correspondingly. 

Evaluate Yourself Honestly

Of course, you need all the encouragement and self-support to reach your goals, but especially during GMAT exam preparation, you need to be hard on yourself if required. If you need a 650+ GMAT score, you should be aware that it will not be a piece of cake. Give yourself credit for what you are doing right, but also consider aspects of the GMAT problems that you need to elaborate on and master additional skills. The dominant thing is separating the action from the person because you are evaluating your actions and not you as a person; you should not upset yourself but rather detect the triggers of low performance and challenges and make yourself accountable for such actions with a plan to move forward from them successfully. Ultimately, the ability to discern your flaws and work on personal evolution is an inherent quality for capacitating your abilities and aptitudes and pulling it off in life. 

We hope that adding these practical and mindful aspects to your daily preparation will be helpful as when you are preparing for an exam like the GMAT, being in the right mind frame can be as important as doing the quant or verbal practice. Whether you have a GMAT private tutor or not, it is on you to maintain motivation during the entire process. We suggest you develop a GMAT test strategy along with these seven tips to attain greater productivity and manifest superb performance. Make studying for the GMAT a daily habit and success will follow. 

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