GMAT Memorization Techniques
Posted on
03
Feb 2022

5 Essential GMAT Memorization Techniques

Find what works for you and stick with it. There is no need to struggle mentally trying to memorize certain techniques when a simpler solution path exists. That is why our tutors at Apex GMAT are professionals in helping our clients learn tips which suit their mental and cognitive abilities. We call this, Cognitive Empathy, and it works by not forcing clients into a ‘one-size-fits-all’ box of GMAT test-prep steps. Rather, we work with our clients by tailoring our approach to their personal needs and capabilities. Here are five GMAT memorization techniques we share with our clients. 

1. Memorize the answer layout

Some question types have the same responses. On the GMAT, answers to the  Data Sufficiency Questions are presented in the same way. These being: 

A) Statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2) alone is not sufficient.
B) Statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (1) alone is not sufficient.
C) Both statements TOGETHER are sufficient, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient.
D) EACH statement ALONE is sufficient.
E) Statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are NOT sufficient.

As a test prepper, you can memorize these statements, given they remain the same throughout the entire GMAT. We suggest memorizing a more simple form of these answer types. For example: 

A) Only Statement 1
B) Only Statement 2
C) Only Both Statements together
D) Either statement
E) Neither statement 

By using this as a memorization technique it will cut down on the time you spend on the test. You won’t need to reread the answer types each time you come in contact with them.  

2. Practice the vocabulary in everyday life

This may sound simple, but trust, this GMAT memorization technique helps! The vocabulary section of the GMAT is tricky, and often people use flashcards to help them memorize terms and concepts. While this is useful, we found that to really engrain the meaning of these words it is best to use them in practice. Decide on a handful of words that you find difficult in their meanings and commit to using them throughout the day or week. This will help you structure the word within a sentence, and learn to use the word properly. Keep a notebook of the most difficult terms and revert back to it as your vocabulary grows! 

3. Use Acronyms and Mnemonics

Struggling with remembering math concepts and equations? The quantitative portion on the GMAT can seem daunting, especially if you are a couple of years out of school and don’t recall some basic math formulas. We understand this, which is why we avoid using math on the GMAT all together! But sometimes, the best path is the most direct. Remember some basic math equations and formulas using the following tricks: 

  • Simple Interest Formula
    • Interest = principal x rate x time 
    • I = prt 
    • Remember the equation as: I am Pretty! 
  • Distance Formula 
    • Distance = rate x time
    • D = rt
    • This equation can be remembered as the word: dirt
  • Linear Equation
    • Y = mx + b 
    • B for begin / M for move 
    • To graph a line, begin at the B-value and move according to the m-value (slope) 
  • Multiplying Binomials 
    • (x – a)(x + b) 
    • Remember FOIL for the order: 
      • First
      • Outside
      • Inside
      • Last 
  • Order of Operations
    • When answering an equation which looks something like this: 7 x (4 / 6) + 2 = remember: PEMDAS or Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally 
    • Parentheses 
    • Exponents 
    • Multiplication
    • Division
    • Addition
    • Subtraction 

4. Apply a visual meaning to things 

While studying, look at what is around you and apply meaning to objects. If you are working on a particular math problem, stare at the radiator in your room. Then, during the exam (if you are taking the GMAT online), look at the radiator if you come in contact with a similar problem. This trick will help your brain in remembering what you learned while studying. If you are taking the GMAT onsite, consider pieces of clothes or jewelry which you will wear during your test. Perhaps fiddle with a ring on your finger while memorizing words, or wear a favorite sweater which you associate with certain mnemonic devices. This is a trick we give our clients, and it ends up helping them during the test! 

5. Apply the knowledge you are learning often

It is one thing to read things out of a textbook and take notes, it is a whole other thing to apply the information you are learning. Doing one or two practice questions won’t automatically make you a whiz at that particular type of problem (even if you got the answers right), but rather practicing in different situations (ie at a restaurant, while riding into work, while cooking dinner), which challenges your brain to think strategically in various situations. This prepares you for the dynamic environment of the testing facility. You can do this both with the quantitative and qualitative portions of the exam. Plus it would look extra cool if you are seen jotting math equations down on a napkin while waiting for your food at a restaurant. 

Final Thoughts

These GMAT memorization techniques may seem straightforward, but they require work. However, hard work does pay off in the long run! The amount of work you put into your studying can dictate where you end up attending school, and thus the job you receive after graduating. While you are not your GMAT, your GMAT score does play a large role in your overall application to your dream school! If you are looking for extra help in preparing for the GMAT, we offer extensive one-on-one GMAT tutoring for high-achieving students. You can schedule a complimentary, 30-minute consultation call with one of our tutors to learn more! 

 

Contributor: Dana Coggio

Read more
GMAT Exam
Posted on
30
Dec 2021

Before Taking The GMAT Exam, You Should Do These 3 Things

Imagine that you wake up on a sunny day, you feel energized and positive about where your day is headed, and you have a plan in your head on how to organize your time efficiently so that you can begin preparing for your GMAT exam. Then, suddenly, you realize that you only have a few days left before your GMAT exam date. You start overthinking about what you know or don’t know about the exam, its procedure, the dos and don’ts, and you feel yourself getting stressed. This is a normal feeling for most people who have exams coming up and feel like they lost track of time. But no need to panic – We gotcha!  Here are a few things you can do to help with the process.

1. Get yourself accustomed to the GMAT exam procedure

It is of utmost importance that you know the GMAT exam procedure by heart before taking the test. This can help by making sure the exam goes smoothly and you don’t get worried about making silly mistakes.

So, how is the GMAT structured and what are its procedures?

Here is a brief recap. The GMAT has 4 sections:

The total time it takes to complete the GMAT, with breaks, is usually 3.5 hours. If you’re interested in knowing how the scoring of the GMAT goes, you can watch this short and comprehensive YouTube video.

2. Take the GMAT practice exam during the same time as the real one

Having routines in life helps us manage our time efficiently. The same can be said for the GMAT exam. It is crucial that you know what time your real exam is going to be so that you can start preparing and practicing during the same time of the day. Why is this important? Let’s say you usually wake up at 11:00 AM and start studying around 1:00 PM. If your exam starts at 10:00 AM, you’re going to have a hard time functioning to the best of your abilities. Thus, it is suggested that you create a routine around your exam time so that your brain and body can get used to it.

3. Revise your previous GMAT mistakes, but don’t acquire new knowledge

Cramming in new information a few days before taking the GMAT does not usually result in effective learning. It is a student’s habit to start learning new material at midnight, but this will not help you solidify your knowledge. Your GMAT exam procedure needs practice and time, and you simply cannot learn new things in a span of a few hours. That is why it is better to go over what you have learned thus far, which will help in remembering what you already know. If this makes you feel like you have to have a plan, that is great! You can start with study plans months or even a year beforehand. Take a look at this 3-Month GMAT Guide to help you start your journey with preparing for the GMAT.

Final Thoughts

It is often easy to get stressed before the exam and lose track of time. To feel prepared to take the GMAT, it is advised that you get accustomed to the exam procedure, take the practice exam during the same time as the real one, and revise your previous mistakes, but don’t try to acquire new knowledge a day or two out. These are only a few GMAT tips to help you feel more confident about the big day, for more, you can check out our other articles. 

Some people feel more assured about taking the GMAT when they have instructors. If you can do it on your own, then good job! If you are thinking about having an instructor help you with the GMAT, you can sign up for a complimentary consultation call. Our tutors at APEX have all scored 770+ and are professional in the field. In this consultation call, they will guide you in your GMAT journey. Rest assured, you will be in good hands!

Read more

5 GMAT Study Habits To Incorporate Now To Avoid Procrastination

5 GMAT Study Habits To Incorporate Now To Avoid Procrastination

You have everything prepared. Your desk is neat and tidy, your books are placed perfectly within reach, your computer is on, and your flashcards are written. Perhaps you have brewed a fresh cup of coffee and have just settled in with every intention to study for the next few hours. But lo and behold, 3 hours later, you find yourself glued to your phone, having wandered down the youtube rabbit hole and watching your fifth 20-minute video on how paint dries! 

You can’t help but be frustrated with what just happened. And it happens more often than people would like to think. Whether it is spending hours cleaning your room or gazing wistfully out the window, procrastination is every student’s worst nightmare and biggest foe. 

When studying for the GMAT, you will encounter opportunities to procrastinate around every corner. So how do you overcome these distractions? We have 5 tips and tricks which you can incorporate into your study schedule to help you avoid GMAT procrastination. Whether you are just starting out, or you are already months deep into your study schedule, these habits can be incorporated now and follow you throughout your GMAT journey and into your professional future. 

1. Acknowledge when you procrastinate

Maybe you are staring out the window because it is a beautiful day, or you are maddeningly vacuuming your home because it’s been needing to get done. Regardless, you’re procrastinating. And the first step in overcoming procrastination is to admit when you are procrastinating. If you find yourself in the middle of a cleaning session, there is no need to stop in the middle of your task. Rather, re-evaluate why you are cleaning. Is it to avoid studying or is it because you’ve been meaning to vacuum for a while.

Regardless, finish what you are doing. Finish vacuuming, finish staring out the window, finish cooking or cleaning. While completing your task, however, begin thinking about your study schedule. What will you be studying and for how long? Once you complete your GMAT procrastination task, sit down and begin studying. You should have spent the last hour(s) mentally preparing for the studying session, and by the time you are ready to begin your body and mind should be fully primed. 

2. Create a list and a reward system 

Yes, this may sound cliche, but lists (and rewards) help! Before sitting down to study, write out what you are planning on doing during the session. Create a list with high-priority and low-priority tasks. Establish a rewards system. What do you crave most when studying? Do you want to take a walk? Clean? Chat with a friend? After completing a high-priority task, reward yourself with a cleaning session, or a quick walk around the block. This will keep you on your toes and create a rhythm which your body adapts to. 

3. Free yourself of perfectionism 

It’s important to expect the best for and from yourself. However, striving for perfectionism on a daily basis can lead to stress and anxiety. Be realistic in what you can accomplish while studying for the GMAT. Not every day will be a perfect study day. But studying every day, whether perfect or not, will bring you one step closer to achieving your GMAT goals. Also, recognize that you may not find the perfect time to study every day. Some days are more full than others. On days where studying is difficult to sit down and accomplish, find time in between the chaos to review old concepts. Whether it is flipping through vocab flashcards or attempting a couple math problems, any form of studying is worth doing (whether perfect or not). 

4. Improve your surroundings

The age of technology is full of distractions. We suggest putting away unnecessary technology. If necessary, put your phone in another room, set it to silent, and close all unnecessary tabs on your computer. If you study better with music, we suggest listening to music which is calm and without lyrics. Lo-Fi study beats, for example, are opportune for the studying brain to zero in and focus on the task at hand. Additionally, make sure your desk and study center is free of clutter. This removes visual distractions and forces you to focus on the studying materials lying directly in front of you. If you live with multiple people, let them know that you have blocked out a certain number of hours for studying and ask them to not distract you during this time. 

5. Forgive yourself

Shoulda, coulda, woulda. We hear this a lot. But what is in the past is already behind you! So don’t fret about trying to fix what has already passed. Instead, train your focus on the task that lies in front of you, and trust that you will make the best decisions for your study schedule going forward. 

Your GMAT score and future business school opportunities are dependent on how hard you are willing to work for it. GMAT procrastination is a normal part of studying. Developing habits now which can help you manage your procrastination will make a world of difference during your GMAT journey.

Contributor: Dana Coggio

Read more
How-to GMAT: No Calculator? Use These Mental Math Tips Instead
Posted on
07
Sep 2021

How-to GMAT: No Calculator? Use These Mental Math Tips Instead

The GMAT is an exam largely focused on numbers and numerical data. And while doing math on the GMAT should be avoided sometimes it is inevitable. True, the test-taker is given a calculator for the duration of the Integrated Reasoning section but the same cannot be said for the Quantitative Reasoning Section. 

This article is going to provide some smart calculation shortcuts and mental math tips to help you go through some arithmetical questions without losing too much time and help you get a higher score on the GMAT Quant.

The Basics

Before explaining any methods for dividing and multiplying with ease, let’s make sure we have revised a few simple rules:

  • Numbers with an even last digit are divisible by 2 – 576 is and 943 is not;
  • Numbers with a sum of digits divisible by 3 are also divisible by 3 – 3,465 for example (3+4+6+5=18);
  • If the last 2 digits of a number a divisible by 4, the number itself is divisible by 4 – 5,624 for example (because 24/4=6);
  • Numbers with last digit 0 or 5 are divisible by 5;
  • Numbers that can be divided by both 2 and 3 can be divided by 6;
  • Similar to numbers divisible by 3, numbers divisible by 9 must have a sum of digits divisible by 9 – 6,453 for example;
  • If the last digit of a number is 0 it is divisible by 10;

With that out of the way, we can move onto some more advanced mental math techniques.

Avoid division at all costs

Don’t divide unless there is no other option. And that is especially true with long division. The reason why long division is so perilous is that it is very easy to make a careless mistake as there are usually several steps included in the calculation, it takes too much time, and to be honest, few people are comfortable doing it.

Fortunately, the GMAT doesn’t test the candidates’ human-calculator skills but rather their capacity to think outside the box and show creativity in their solution paths, especially when under pressure – exactly what business schools look for.

However, sometimes you cannot avoid division, and when that is the case remember: Factoring is your best friend. Always simplify fractions especially if you’ll need to turn them into decimals. For example, if you have 234/26 don’t start immediately trying to calculate the result. Instead, factor them little by little until you receive something like 18/2 which is a lot easier to calculate.

A tip for factoring is to always start with smaller numbers as they are easier to use (2 is easier to use compared to 4, 6, or 8) and also look for nearby round numbers. 

If you have to calculate 256/4 it would be far less tedious and time-consuming to represent 256 as 240+16 and calculate 240/4+16/4=60+4=64. Another example is 441/3. If we express it like 450-9 it is far easier to calculate 450/3-9/3=150-3=147.

Dividing and Multiplying by 5

Sometimes when you have to divide and multiply by 5 (you’ll have to do it a lot) it would be easier to substitute the number with 10/2. It might not always be suitable for your situation but more often than not it can be utilized in order to save some time.

Using 9s

With most problems, you could safely substitute 9 with 10-1. For example, if you have to calculate 46(9) you can express it as 46(10 – 1) which is a lot more straightforward to compute as 46(10) – 46(1) = 460 – 46 = 414

You can also use the same method for other numbers such as 11, 8, 15, 100, etc:

18(11) = 18(10 + 1) = 180 + 18 = 198

28(8) = 28(10 – 2) = 280 – 56 = 224

22(15) = 22(10 + 5) = 220 + 110 = 330

26(99) = 26(100 – 1) = 2600 – 26 = 2574

Dividing by 7

The easiest way to check if a number is divisible by 7 is to find the nearest number you know is divisible by 7. For instance, if you want to check if you can divide 98 by 7 you should look for the nearest multiple of 7. In this instance either 70, 77, or 84. Start adding 7 until you reach the number: 70 + 7 = 77 + 7 = 84 + 7 = 91 + 7 = 98. The answer is yes, 98 is divisible by 7 and it equals 14

Squaring

When you have to find the square of a double-digit number it might be easier to break the number into components. For example, 22^2 would be calculated like this:

22^2
= (20 + 2)(20 + 2)
= 400 + 40 + 40 + 4
= 484

Similarly, if you have to find the square of 39 instead of calculating (30 + 9)(30 +9) you could express it like this:

39^2
= (40 – 1)(40 – 1)
= 1600 – 40 – 40 + 1
= 1521

You can use the same approach when multiplying almost any double-digit numbers, not only squaring. For example 37 times 73:

(40 – 3)(70 + 3)
= 2800 + 120 – 210 – 9
= 2701

Conclusion

This ends the list of mental math tips and tricks you can utilize to make the Quant section a bit less laborious. Keep in mind that no strategy or shortcut would be able to compensate for the lack of proper prep so it all comes down not only to practicing but doing so the right way.

For more information regarding the GMAT Calculator, GMAT Calculator & Mental Math – All You Need To Know, is a very insightful article to read.

Read more
At-Home GMAT Prep: A Handy Guide
Posted on
02
Sep 2021

At-Home GMAT Prep: A Handy Guide

Ready to take the next step in your academic career and select an MBA program that will open new doors for you? Well first, you need to take one of the most important exams of your life – the GMAT. This is not something you can take easily as it can potentially score you some scholarships that will help fund your education and it’s one of those things that employers will want to take a look at. That’s why people spend months preparing for the GMAT. That being said, Apex tutors suggest a prep time period of 90 to 120 days.

So, to make the process easier for you, we came up with a guide full of the best tips and tricks that will help you prepare for the GMAT at home, along with some common mistakes to avoid when prepping.

The 2 Main Benefits of At-Home GMAT Prep

It essentially comes down to you to work hard and follow some best practices. Here’s how at-home self-prep will help you succeed:

  • You’ll be able to study in a familiar place. That will make you more comfortable and having a designated GMAT prep space will keep you more focused on your progress.
  • This is a good opportunity for you to study at your own pace and at a schedule that best suits you and your needs. This is definitely a much more convenient alternative than any GMAT prep class that you can take to help you prep.

Top 5 Tips To Follow for a Successful At-Home GMAT Prep

Here are the top 5 best practices to follow when preparing for the GMAT at home:

Find a Good Location

What you want to do is have a designated space where you sit down every day and work on the GMAT. You’d want to pick a place where there are no distractions and where you’ll be able to get work done without being bothered. One thing to keep in mind is that you don’t want to get too comfortable as you actually want to get some work done and not just end up laying down and napping every time you decide to study for the GMAT.

Give Yourself Enough Time

Make sure to start early with your GMAT preparation as the more time you have to work on improving, the higher your chances of succeeding and getting a higher score. That’s why you’d want to give yourself a minimum of 3 months to prepare depending on your prior knowledge and the level of preparation that you’ll need to succeed.

Follow a Structured Schedule

As soon as you decide to start preparing for the GMAT, you’re going to have to come up with a personalized schedule that you have to follow until the exam day. Following a schedule where you have to practice a bit every day instead of cramming everything on the last week, will keep you more focused. It will also not overwork you and you’ll have just enough time to go through every section in detail and also some extra time to take some mock tests to practice your knowledge.

Practice, Practice, Practice!

You know what they say: practice makes perfect. Well, they’re not wrong! The more practice you get before taking the actual exam, the better, especially because mock tests help you point out the areas that you need to work harder on. Mock exams also help you get used to the exam’s format and scoring system so you won’t have trouble navigating the exam in the future.

To make things easier, here are a few alternatives where you can get practice tests and official materials to practice on:

Learn to Manage Your Time!

The test-takers’ #1 pitfall is not focusing on the time when preparing for the GMAT, being well-aware that GMAT is a timed exam. We suggest practicing without a time constraint at first, just so you can get used to the format and the concepts. After you get a better understanding of what to expect, you can start timing yourself. You’d want to practice with a timer in order to actually see how well you’d perform in the real GMAT exam. Time pressure is a real thing, and what you don’t want to do is show up and not be able to finish your test on time.

Top 3 Mistakes To Avoid When Preparing for the GMAT

Now that we went over some of the best tips, let’s talk about some common mistakes that students make that you definitely need to avoid:

Procrastinating

Deciding that you need to start prepping for the GMAT in advance is one thing, but what most people end up doing is doing a little bit in the beginning and then procrastinating until it’s too late to go back. You don’t want to cram everything in the last 2 weeks: that’s not time-efficient and it won’t help you master the exam. Instead, you’ll just get more stressed and overwhelmed. In other words, try to keep the same pace throughout the whole 3-4 month period of your at-home GMAT prep in order to get the score you’re aiming for.

Stressing Way Too Much On Exam Day

It’s normal to worry about your scores as this exam can very well determine your future. However, worrying way too much can affect your performance on exam day. Instead, take your time to prepare and do your best when the time comes for you to take the GMAT, and you’ll be just fine. One extra step that you can take to help you manage the stress is visiting the test center before the exam. That way, you’ll get used to the journey and the place and you’ll also feel more relaxed if you know what to expect.  

Studying Instead Of Practicing

Another mistake students make is studying study guides instead of practicing extensively. Study guides can help you so much, but practicing on real exams is what will essentially put all that textbook knowledge into practice. So make sure to spend most of your time on actual practice, rather than focusing on learning concepts by heart.

Pro tip: Another way to help you accelerate learning is by working with a one-on-one GMAT instructor. The help of an expert can be beneficial, especially when you find that you are not making any progress with your prep or if you find yourself falling victim to any of the at-home prep mistakes listed above. These instructors know their way around the exam and will bring some structure to your at-home GMAT prep as they work around your schedule and will keep you focused on what’s important.

Read more
GMAT Quant Syllabus 2021-2022
Posted on
22
Jul 2021

GMAT Quant Syllabus 2021-2022

Author: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Altea Sollulari
Date: 22 July, 2021

We know what you’re thinking: math is a scary subject and not everyone can excel at it. And now with the GMAT the stakes are much higher, especially because there is a whole section dedicated to math that you need to prepare for in order to guarantee a good score. There is good news though, the GMAT is not actually testing your math skills, but rather your creative problem solving skills through math questions. Furthermore, the GMAT only requires that you have sound knowledge of high school level mathematics. So, you just need to practice your fundamentals and learn how to use them to solve specific GMAT problems and find solution paths that work to your advantage. 

The Quantitative Reasoning section on the GMAT contains a total of 31 questions, and you are given 62 minutes to complete all of them. This gives you just 2 minutes to solve each question, so in most cases, the regular way of solving math equations that you were taught in high school will not cut it. So finding the optimal problem solving process for each question type is going to be pivotal to your success in this section. This can seem a daunting start, so our expert Apex GMAT instructors recommend that you start your quant section prep with a review of the types of GMAT questions asked in the test and math fundamentals if you have not been using high school math in your day to day life. 

What types of questions will you find in the GMAT quant?

There are 2 main types of questions you should look out for when preparing to take the GMAT exam:

Data Sufficiency Questions

For this type of GMAT question, you don’t generally need to do calculations. However, you will have to determine whether the information that is provided to you is sufficient to answer the question. These questions aim to evaluate your critical thinking skills. 

They generally contain a question, 2 statements, and 5 answer choices that are the same in all GMAT data sufficiency questions.

Here’s an example of a number theory data sufficiency problem video, where Mike explains the best way to go about solving such a question.

Problem Solving Questions

This question type is pretty self-explanatory: you’ll have to solve the question and come up with a solution. However, you’ll be given 5 answer choices to choose from. Generally, the majority of questions in the quant section of the GMAT will be problem-solving questions as they clearly show your abilities to use mathematical concepts to solve problems.

Make sure to check out this video where Mike shows you how to solve a Probability question.

The main concepts you should focus on

The one thing that you need to keep in mind when starting your GMAT prep is the level of math you need to know before going in for the Quant section. All you’ll need to master is high-school level math. That being said, once you have revised and mastered these math fundamentals, your final step is learning how to apply this knowledge to actual GMAT problems and you should be good to go. This is the more challenging side of things but doing this helps you tackle all the other problem areas you may be facing such as time management, confidence levels, and test anxiety

Here are the 4 main groups of questions on the quant section of the GMAT and the concepts that you should focus on for each:

Algebra

  • Algebraic expressions
  • Equations
  • Functions
  • Polynomials
  • Permutations and combinations
  • Inequalities
  • Exponents

Geometry

  • Lines
  • Angles
  • Triangles
  • Circles
  • Polygons
  • Surface area
  • Volume
  • Coordinate geometry

Word problems

  • Profit
  • Sets
  • Rate
  • Interest
  • Percentage
  • Ratio
  • Mixtures

Check out this Profit and Loss question.

Arithmetic

  • Number theory
  • Percentages
  • Basic statistics
  • Power and root
  • Integer properties
  • Decimals
  • Fractions
  • Probability
  • Real numbers

Make sure to try your hand at this GMAT probability problem.

5 tips to improve your GMAT quant skills?

  1. Master the fundamentals! This is your first step towards acing this section of the GMAT. As this section only contains math that you have already studied thoroughly in high-school, you’ll only need to revise what you have already learned and you’ll be ready to start practicing some real GMAT problems. 
  2. Practice time management! This is a crucial step as every single question is timed and you won’t get more than 2 minutes to spend on each question. That is why you should start timing yourself early on in your GMAT prep, so you get used to the time pressure. 
  3. Know the question types! This is something that you will learn once you get enough practice with some actual GMAT questions. That way, you’ll be able to easily recognize different question types and you’ll be able to use your preferred solution path without losing time.
  4. Memorize the answer choices for the data sufficiency questions! These answers are always the same and their order never changes. Memorizing them will help you save precious time that you can spend elsewhere. To help you better memorize them, we are sharing an easier and less wordy way to think of them:
  5. Make use of your scrap paper! There is a reason why you’re provided with scrap paper, so make sure to take advantage of it. You will definitely need it to take notes and make calculations, especially for the problem-solving questions that you will come across in this GMAT question.
  • Only statement 1
  • Only statement 2
  • Both statements together
  • Either statement
  • Neither statement
Read more
The Advantages of Being a Non-native Speaker on the GMAT
Posted on
13
Jul 2021

The Advantages of Being a Non-native Speaker on the GMAT

By: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Svetozara Saykova
Date: 13th July 2020

GMAT Non Native Speaker Advantages:

The GMAT is a challenging exam to all, but it can be particularly difficult for non-native speakers. Since it is administered in English only, which is an additional obstacle one needs to consider when preparing for the GMAT exam. If you aren’t secure in your English language skills don’t hurry to get frustrated. Being aware that this is your weak spot is the first step towards improving and we advise you to not stop here. Be sure to research small habits that can immensely improve your English language skills. Watching tv series and movies in English with subtitles, reading English or American literature or listening to a podcast are all leisurely activities that can help you polish your English. If your English is already excellent, that is a win. This article will provide you with tips and insights on how to utilize your bilingual (or multilingual) background to excel in your GMAT preparation. 

Grammar is Your Best Friend 

The GMAT is specifically designed to test native English speakers. A majority of native speakers have not spent years memorizing grammar rules and enriching their vocabularies by writing down or repeating words and phrases. They have learned English through hearing people around them speak, just like you have learned your native language. Due to this lack of thorough grammatical knowledge, native speakers can get confused by the pitfalls intentionally placed throughout the GMAT exam, especially in the Verbal section. For them the hidden traps remain unnoticed but for non native speakers they can often be easily spotted since non-native speakers know the grammar rules. By contrast, most non-native speakers have learned English through repetition and mastering grammar rules. Such familiarity with English grammar prior to any GMAT preparation is an invaluable asset. It might cut short your prep time and allow you to concentrate and work on areas that are more difficult for you. 

You Know What Dedication Means

Learning a language is a demanding and long undertaking. Countless hours of studying words and collocations, memorizing grammar rules, reading, listening, writing, and doing practice exams are all more or less part of the journey to mastering any language. Your English proficiency did not appear overnight, but once you know your learning style, the journey accelerates. Learning a new skill is a process, which requires personalization and an approach that suits your character and studying style. Similarly, the GMAT requires one to develop techniques, approaches to problems, and most importantly a proper mindset over a period of time in order to achieve a great score. You might already be aware of what works for you and what definitely doesn’t in terms of learning and this will provide you with a vantage position for successfully kick starting your GMAT prep. 

You Have a Bilingual Brain 

Back in the days bilingualism was considered to be a drawback, which slowed down one’s cognitive development. Those beliefs were disproved long ago and to the contrary, it has been confirmed that being bilingual/multilingual is beneficial to one’s brain and to their cognitive abilities. For instance, the effort and attention needed to switch between languages triggers more activity in the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex. This part of the brain plays a main role in executive function, problem solving and focusing while filtering out irrelevant information. Those are some of the essential skills that the GMAT is testing: 

are some of the GMAT challenges that you should have an easier time tackling as a bilingual individual. 

These are some of the advantages a non-native English speaker could have when it comes to the GMAT. Being aware of your strengths and weaknesses is a vital component to achieving a remarkable score on the GMAT. Here at Apex GMAT we have a team of dedicated and knowledgeable professionals eager to provide excellent guidance to non native speakers. We take great pride in our personalized approach and this can be the exact strategy that will help you turn your background and previous experience into an invaluable advantage.

Read more
Featured Video Play Icon
Posted on
19
May 2021

GMAT Algebra Problem – Parts – Hotdogs & Donuts

GMAT Algebra Problem Introduction

Hi guys. Today I’m here with a classic GMAT Algebra problem, what we call a parts problem. And if you take a look at this problem you’re going to realize that it just looks like a bunch of algebra. But the key here is in how you frame it. We’ve got this diner or whatnot selling hot dogs and then after that point, so imagine like a timeline, they start selling donuts. Then they give us a piece of information about hot dogs to donuts over that course of secondary time but then give us this overarching total number of food products sold.

Distill The Ration

So what we need to do are two steps: the first one is fairly straightforward. We see that we have to get rid of the hot dogs that were sold in advance in order to distill the ratio but then the ratio can seem very, very complex, especially because it just tells us seven times and a lot of times the GMAT will do this as a way to throw us off the scent. So when we have seven times, what that means is we have eight parts. That is it’s saying for every one of these we have one, two, three, four, five, six, seven of these. Meaning in total there are eight. So while seven is kind of a scary number, eight is a number we can divide by easily. You always want to look for that when you’re given a ratio of one thing to another especially when they say something times as many.

Solving the GMAT Problem

We take that thirty thousand two hundred knock off the fifty four hundred and get to twenty four thousand eight hundred and lo and behold that’s divisible by eight meaning each part is going to be 3100. Notice there’s no complex division there, 24 divided by 8, 800 divided by 8 and that’s the sort of mental math we can expect from the GMAT always. Which as you’ve seen before: if you’re doing that you’re doing something wrong.

Each part is 3100 and we’re concerned with the seven parts so we can either scale that 3100 up by seven into 21700, again the math works out super smoothly or we can take the 24800 knock off 3100 and get to that 21700. Notice in the answer choices there’s a few things to address sort of common errors that might be made.

Reviewing the Answer Signals

On one of the answer choices what you’re looking at is dividing the total, the 30 200 by eight and multiplying by seven that is seven eighths of it without getting rid of those first 5400. Another answer is close to our 21700 correct answer and this is also a fairly reliable signal from the GMAT.

When they give you a range of answers but two of them are kind of tightly clustered together a lot of times it’s going to be one of the two and that second one there is to prevent you from too roughly estimating. But at the same time if you’re short on time or just in general you want to hone down and understand what you’re supposed to do that serves as a really strong signal. And then one of the answer choices is the 1/8 of it rather than the 7/8.

Clustered Answer Choices

I want to speak a little more deeply about that signal about those two tightly clustered answer choices because as I said it can help you narrow to a very quick 50/50 when you’re constrained for time or this problem is just one that’s really not up your alley but it also can be leveraged in a really, really neat way.

If we assume that one or the other is the answer choice we can differentiate these two different answer choices by what they’re divisible by and so notice the 21700 is very clearly, with strong mental math is divisible by seven. Where the other one is not. Also neither of them are divisible by eight. We can look at these two say okay one of them is probably right, one of them is divisible by seven, the other one is not, so there’s our right answer and we can move on to the next problem. So I hope this helps. Write your comments and questions below. Subscribe to our channel at Apex GMAT here and give us a call if we can ever help you.

To work on similar GMAT algebra problem/s see this link: Work Rate Problem.

Read more
gmat in toronto
Posted on
02
Feb 2021

Taking the GMAT in Toronto

Table of Contents:

  1. Who administers the GMAT test?
  2. What does the test center look like?
  3. Where are the test centers located?
  4. Test center holidays
  5. Top MBA programs in the area
  6. Tips
  7. Test Day FAQs

About ¾ of the way through your extensive GMAT prep you should begin to start planning your test day, including scheduling the test, preparing your trip to the test center, and even pre-visiting the test center so that you know exactly where it is. This guide is here to offer you all the required information related to taking the GMAT in Toronto.

Who Administers The GMAT in Toronto: 

Pearson Professional Centers – administers the GMAT and EA exam on behalf of the GMAC. To find out more about the Pearson Professional test centers visit https://www.pearson.com/us/.

What Does The Test Center Look Like?

A Pearson Professional Center will include individual testing areas for each test taker with a separation screen between each test-taker.

 

Where are the Test Centers in Toronto?

These are the test centers in Toronto where test-takers had the best experience:

Pearson Professional Centres-Toronto (Downtown) ON

1075 Bay Street
Suite 525
Toronto, Ontario M5S 2B1
Canada

By car:gmat test center in toronto 1

From Central Park Lodge (7 minutes):

  • Take Madison Ave and Huron St to Bloor St W
  • Turn left onto Bloor St W
  • Turn right onto Devonshire Pl
  • Take Wellesley St W to Bay St

Test-takers’ review:

This test center was rated 5.0 by Google reviewers.

Pearson Professional Centres-Toronto (West) ON

1 Eva Road
Suite 400to
Toronto, Ontario M9C 4Z5
Canada
Phone: +1 416-620-9111

By car:

From Central Park Lodge (25 minutes):

  • Get on Gardiner Expy W from Queen’s Park Cres W and University Ave
  • Continue on Gardiner Expy W to Etobicoke. Take the Burnhamthorpe Rd/Rathburn Rd exit from ON-427 N
  • Drive to your destination

Test-takers’ review:

This test center was rated 3.6 by Google reviewers. They mentioned that the facilities were clean, quiet, and organized.

Test Center Holidays: 

The most popular times for GMAT preparation and test-taking are during the holiday seasons. Be mindful of dates that you will not be able to take the GMAT or EA at any of the test centers mentioned above. Pearson test centers are closed during the following dates:

  • 1 Jan- New Year’s Day
  • 17 Feb- Family Day Canada
  • 10 Apr- Good Friday
  • 18 May- Victoria Day
  • 1 Jul- Canada Day
  • 7 Sep – Labour Day
  • 12 Oct- Thanksgiving
  • 25 Dec- Christmas Day
  • 28 Dec – Boxing Day
Top MBA Programs In Toronto

Tips:

  • During the test there will not be complete silence – you will be able to hear noise from other test takers so it is best to prepare for this by studying for the exam in similar scenarios. This can prepare you for any distractions (such as coughing, sneezing, or computer clicking sounds) that might occur while taking your exam.  
  • Try to spend some time actually prepping in the lobby of the test center weeks/days in advance of your exam date. Since the place will be familiar to you come test day this can help curb test anxiety should you have any.

Test Day FAQs

Here are the top 5 questions that clients ask us about exam day information:

  • Are you allowed to listen to music while taking the GMAT exam?

You are not allowed to listen to music while taking the GMAT exam and you are not allowed to wear earphones as well. 

  • What should I do if I fall sick on the exam day?

If you do not feel well come exam day you will have to make the decision as to whether or not you can take the test and perform at your best. Most people will not be able to do this so it will be best to cancel it. If you do so on the day of the exam you will incur a loss of your full $250 exam fee. If you cancel the exam 7 days in advance you will be charged a penalty of $50. If it is the first time that you will sit the exam and you are up for sitting through a 4 hour test, this may be a good opportunity to experience the test as you have the ability to cancel the score right afterwards if you are unhappy with it. Ultimately, it is best to take the GMAT when you are feeling your best as this will result in your optimum test performance. 

  • What can I bring with me to the test center?

You are allowed in the test center with the following:

  • GMAT approved identification
  • Appointment confirmation letter or email you received from Pearson VUE
  • Prescription eyeglasses
  • Light sweater or light non-outerwear jacket
  • Comfort items only if they were pre-approved as an accommodation received in advance

Any additional personal belongings that you bring with you such as your cell phone, bag, snacks, and earphones will need to be stored in one of the provided lockers. You may eat your snack during the breaks. Any cell phone use throughout the test time (including breaks) is prohibited. 

The test center will provide you with everything that you need in order to take the test including scratch paper and a pencil. 

  • Should I wear a mask during the exam?

At the test centers above they strongly recommend that you wear a face mask or some type of face-covering in the test center and for the duration of your test to protect yourself and others. Test centers do not provide face masks for candidates. 

Please note that if you have any flu-like symptoms upon arrival at the test center, you may be requested to reschedule your exam for another time when you are in full health.

  • What can I expect at the test center?

A usual test center is typically quite small. Once you arrive you will have to provide the administrator with the relevant documents and while these are being processed you will be asked to wait in the waiting area. In this area, you can still access all your personal belongings up until you are called into the testing room. 

Once in the room, you will be allocated an individual exam station where you will find a computer. 

Find more FAQs: HERE

For any questions or comments please reach out to us at www.apexgmat.com.
To speak to an Apex instructor about your GMAT prep, schedule a call HERE.

Read more
GMAT in Los Angeles
Posted on
29
Jan 2021

Taking the GMAT in Los Angeles

Table of Contents:

  1. Who administers the GMAT test?
  2. What does the test center look like?
  3. Where are the test centers located?
  4. Test center holidays
  5. Top MBA programs in the area
  6. Tips
  7. Test Day FAQs

About ¾ of the way through your extensive GMAT prep you should begin to start planning your test day, including scheduling the test, preparing your trip to the test center, and even pre-visiting the test center so that you know exactly where it is. This guide is here to offer you all the required information related to taking the GMAT in Los Angeles.

Who Administers The GMAT in Los Angeles: 

Pearson Professional Centers – administers the GMAT and EA exam on behalf of the GMAC. To find out more about the Pearson Professional test centers visit https://www.pearson.com/us/.

What Does The Test Center Look Like?

A Pearson Professional Center will include individual testing areas for each test taker with a separation screen between each test-taker.

Where are the Test Centers in Los Angeles?

These are the test centers in Los Angeles where test-takers had the best experience:

Pearson Professional Centers-Pasadena (LA) CA

70 S. Lake Avenue
Suite 840
Union Bank Building
Pasadena, California 91101
United States
Phone: +1 626-397-2815

By car:gmat in la test center 1

From Central LA (24 minutes):

  • Get on US-101 S from S Wilton Pl and Melrose Ave
  • Take CA-110 N/Arroyo Seco Pkwy to E Glenarm St in Pasadena
  • Take S Los Robles Ave and Cordova St to S Lake Ave

Test-takers’ review:

This test center was rated 5.0 by Google reviewers. They mentioned that the staff was extremely helpful and professional and the test center was highly monitored.

Alternative Options Outside the City:

If you would like to get away from the hustle of the city for your exam or if test centers within the city do not have any openings, there are two other options for you in either Ontario or Lake Forest:

Pearson Professional Centers-Ontario (LA) CA

3401 Centrelake Drive
Suite 675
Centrelake Plaza
Ontario, California 91761
United States
Phone: +1 909-937-3223

By car:gmat in la test center 2

From Central LA (46 minutes):

  • Get on US-101 S from S Wilton Pl and Melrose Ave
  • Take I-10 E to N Haven Ave in Ontario. Take exit 56 from I-10 E
  • Continue on N Haven Ave to your destination

Test-takers’ review:

This test center was rated 4.6 by Google reviewers. They mentioned that the staff was courteous, helpful, and professional. The facility was clean and there is free parking.

Pearson Professional Centers-Lake Forest (LA) CA

23792 Rockfield Blvd.
Suite 200
Lake Forest, California 92630
United States
Phone: +1 949-206-0344

By car:gmat in la test center 3

From Central LA (49 minutes):

  • Get on US-101 S from S Wilton Pl and Melrose Ave
  • Take I-5 S to Lake Forest Dr in Orange County. Take exit 92 from I-5 S
  • Follow Lake Forest Dr and Rockfield Blvd to your destination in Lake Forest

Test-takers’ review:

This test center was rated 4.5 by Google reviewers. The reviewers mentioned that the staff was professional and helpful, and the facility was easy-to-find and quiet.

Test Center Holidays: 

The most popular times for GMAT preparation and test-taking are during the holiday seasons. Be mindful of dates that you will not be able to take the GMAT or EA at any of the test centers mentioned above. Pearson test centers are closed during the following dates:

  • 1 Jan – New Year’s Day 
  • 2 Apr – Good Friday   
  • 5 Apr – Easter Monday 
  • 3 May – May Day 
  • 31 May – Late May Bank Holiday   
  • 30 Aug – August Bank Holiday
  • 25 Dec – Christmas Day
  • 26 Dec – Boxing Day 
  • 27 Dec – Christmas Holiday
  • 28 Dec – Boxing Day Holiday
Top MBA Programs In Los Angeles

Tips:

  • During the test there will not be complete silence – you will be able to hear noise from other test takers so it is best to prepare for this by studying for the exam in similar scenarios. This can prepare you for any distractions (such as coughing, sneezing, or computer clicking sounds) that might occur while taking your exam.  
  • Try to spend some time actually prepping in the lobby of the test center weeks/days in advance of your exam date. Since the place will be familiar to you come test day this can help curb test anxiety should you have any.

Test Day FAQs

Here are the top 5 questions that clients ask us about exam day information:

  • Are you allowed to listen to music while taking the GMAT exam?

You are not allowed to listen to music while taking the GMAT exam and you are not allowed to wear earphones as well. 

  • What should I do if I fall sick on the exam day?

If you do not feel well come exam day you will have to make the decision as to whether or not you can take the test and perform at your best. Most people will not be able to do this so it will be best to cancel it. If you do so on the day of the exam you will incur a loss of your full $250 exam fee. If you cancel the exam 7 days in advance you will be charged a penalty of $50. If it is the first time that you will sit the exam and you are up for sitting through a 4 hour test, this may be a good opportunity to experience the test as you have the ability to cancel the score right afterwards if you are unhappy with it. Ultimately, it is best to take the GMAT when you are feeling your best as this will result in your optimum test performance. 

  • What can I bring with me to the test center?

You are allowed in the test center with the following:

  • GMAT approved identification
  • Appointment confirmation letter or email you received from Pearson VUE
  • Prescription eyeglasses
  • Light sweater or light non-outerwear jacket
  • Comfort items only if they were pre-approved as an accommodation received in advance

Any additional personal belongings that you bring with you such as your cell phone, bag, snacks, and earphones will need to be stored in one of the provided lockers. You may eat your snack during the breaks. Any cell phone use throughout the test time (including breaks) is prohibited. 

The test center will provide you with everything that you need in order to take the test including scratch paper and a pencil. 

  • Should I wear a mask during the exam?

At the test centers above they strongly recommend that you wear a face mask or some type of face-covering in the test center and for the duration of your test to protect yourself and others. Test centers do not provide face masks for candidates. 

Please note that if you have any flu-like symptoms upon arrival at the test center, you may be requested to reschedule your exam for another time when you are in full health.

  • What can I expect at the test center?

A usual test center is typically quite small. Once you arrive you will have to provide the administrator with the relevant documents and while these are being processed you will be asked to wait in the waiting area. In this area, you can still access all your personal belongings up until you are called into the testing room. 

Once in the room, you will be allocated an individual exam station where you will find a computer. 

Find more FAQs: HERE

For any questions or comments please reach out to us at www.apexgmat.com.
To speak to an Apex instructor about your GMAT prep, schedule a call HERE.

Read more