GMAT Quant Syllabus 2021-2022
Posted on
22
Jul 2021

GMAT Quant Syllabus 2021-2022

Author: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Altea Sollulari
Date: 22 July, 2021

We know what you’re thinking: math is a scary subject and not everyone can excel at it. And now with the GMAT the stakes are much higher, especially because there is a whole section dedicated to math that you need to prepare for in order to guarantee a good score. There is good news though, the GMAT is not actually testing your math skills, but rather your creative problem solving skills through math questions. Furthermore, the GMAT only requires that you have sound knowledge of high school level mathematics. So, you just need to practice your fundamentals and learn how to use them to solve specific GMAT problems and find solution paths that work to your advantage. 

The Quantitative Reasoning section on the GMAT contains a total of 31 questions, and you are given 62 minutes to complete all of them. This gives you just 2 minutes to solve each question, so in most cases, the regular way of solving math equations that you were taught in high school will not cut it. So finding the optimal problem solving process for each question type is going to be pivotal to your success in this section. This can seem a daunting start, so our expert Apex GMAT instructors recommend that you start your quant section prep with a review of the types of GMAT questions asked in the test and math fundamentals if you have not been using high school math in your day to day life. 

What types of questions will you find in the GMAT quant?

There are 2 main types of questions you should look out for when preparing to take the GMAT exam:

Data Sufficiency Questions

For this type of GMAT question, you don’t generally need to do calculations. However, you will have to determine whether the information that is provided to you is sufficient to answer the question. These questions aim to evaluate your critical thinking skills. 

They generally contain a question, 2 statements, and 5 answer choices that are the same in all GMAT data sufficiency questions.

Here’s an example of a number theory data sufficiency problem video, where Mike explains the best way to go about solving such a question.

Problem Solving Questions

This question type is pretty self-explanatory: you’ll have to solve the question and come up with a solution. However, you’ll be given 5 answer choices to choose from. Generally, the majority of questions in the quant section of the GMAT will be problem-solving questions as they clearly show your abilities to use mathematical concepts to solve problems.

Make sure to check out this video where Mike shows you how to solve a Probability question.

The main concepts you should focus on

The one thing that you need to keep in mind when starting your GMAT prep is the level of math you need to know before going in for the Quant section. All you’ll need to master is high-school level math. That being said, once you have revised and mastered these math fundamentals, your final step is learning how to apply this knowledge to actual GMAT problems and you should be good to go. This is the more challenging side of things but doing this helps you tackle all the other problem areas you may be facing such as time management, confidence levels, and test anxiety

Here are the 4 main groups of questions on the quant section of the GMAT and the concepts that you should focus on for each:

Algebra

  • Algebraic expressions
  • Equations
  • Functions
  • Polynomials
  • Permutations and combinations
  • Inequalities
  • Exponents

Geometry

  • Lines
  • Angles
  • Triangles
  • Circles
  • Polygons
  • Surface area
  • Volume
  • Coordinate geometry

Word problems

  • Profit
  • Sets
  • Rate
  • Interest
  • Percentage
  • Ratio
  • Mixtures

Check out this Profit and Loss question.

Arithmetic

  • Number theory
  • Percentages
  • Basic statistics
  • Power and root
  • Integer properties
  • Decimals
  • Fractions
  • Probability
  • Real numbers

Make sure to try your hand at this GMAT probability problem.

5 tips to improve your GMAT quant skills?

  1. Master the fundamentals! This is your first step towards acing this section of the GMAT. As this section only contains math that you have already studied thoroughly in high-school, you’ll only need to revise what you have already learned and you’ll be ready to start practicing some real GMAT problems. 
  2. Practice time management! This is a crucial step as every single question is timed and you won’t get more than 2 minutes to spend on each question. That is why you should start timing yourself early on in your GMAT prep, so you get used to the time pressure. 
  3. Know the question types! This is something that you will learn once you get enough practice with some actual GMAT questions. That way, you’ll be able to easily recognize different question types and you’ll be able to use your preferred solution path without losing time.
  4. Memorize the answer choices for the data sufficiency questions! These answers are always the same and their order never changes. Memorizing them will help you save precious time that you can spend elsewhere. To help you better memorize them, we are sharing an easier and less wordy way to think of them:
  5. Make use of your scrap paper! There is a reason why you’re provided with scrap paper, so make sure to take advantage of it. You will definitely need it to take notes and make calculations, especially for the problem-solving questions that you will come across in this GMAT question.
  • Only statement 1
  • Only statement 2
  • Both statements together
  • Either statement
  • Neither statement
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Posted on
19
May 2021

GMAT Algebra Problem – Parts – Hotdogs & Donuts

GMAT Algebra Problem Introduction

Hi guys. Today I’m here with a classic GMAT Algebra problem, what we call a parts problem. And if you take a look at this problem you’re going to realize that it just looks like a bunch of algebra. But the key here is in how you frame it. We’ve got this diner or whatnot selling hot dogs and then after that point, so imagine like a timeline, they start selling donuts. Then they give us a piece of information about hot dogs to donuts over that course of secondary time but then give us this overarching total number of food products sold.

Distill The Ration

So what we need to do are two steps: the first one is fairly straightforward. We see that we have to get rid of the hot dogs that were sold in advance in order to distill the ratio but then the ratio can seem very, very complex, especially because it just tells us seven times and a lot of times the GMAT will do this as a way to throw us off the scent. So when we have seven times, what that means is we have eight parts. That is it’s saying for every one of these we have one, two, three, four, five, six, seven of these. Meaning in total there are eight. So while seven is kind of a scary number, eight is a number we can divide by easily. You always want to look for that when you’re given a ratio of one thing to another especially when they say something times as many.

Solving the GMAT Problem

We take that thirty thousand two hundred knock off the fifty four hundred and get to twenty four thousand eight hundred and lo and behold that’s divisible by eight meaning each part is going to be 3100. Notice there’s no complex division there, 24 divided by 8, 800 divided by 8 and that’s the sort of mental math we can expect from the GMAT always. Which as you’ve seen before: if you’re doing that you’re doing something wrong.

Each part is 3100 and we’re concerned with the seven parts so we can either scale that 3100 up by seven into 21700, again the math works out super smoothly or we can take the 24800 knock off 3100 and get to that 21700. Notice in the answer choices there’s a few things to address sort of common errors that might be made.

Reviewing the Answer Signals

On one of the answer choices what you’re looking at is dividing the total, the 30 200 by eight and multiplying by seven that is seven eighths of it without getting rid of those first 5400. Another answer is close to our 21700 correct answer and this is also a fairly reliable signal from the GMAT.

When they give you a range of answers but two of them are kind of tightly clustered together a lot of times it’s going to be one of the two and that second one there is to prevent you from too roughly estimating. But at the same time if you’re short on time or just in general you want to hone down and understand what you’re supposed to do that serves as a really strong signal. And then one of the answer choices is the 1/8 of it rather than the 7/8.

Clustered Answer Choices

I want to speak a little more deeply about that signal about those two tightly clustered answer choices because as I said it can help you narrow to a very quick 50/50 when you’re constrained for time or this problem is just one that’s really not up your alley but it also can be leveraged in a really, really neat way.

If we assume that one or the other is the answer choice we can differentiate these two different answer choices by what they’re divisible by and so notice the 21700 is very clearly, with strong mental math is divisible by seven. Where the other one is not. Also neither of them are divisible by eight. We can look at these two say okay one of them is probably right, one of them is divisible by seven, the other one is not, so there’s our right answer and we can move on to the next problem. So I hope this helps. Write your comments and questions below. Subscribe to our channel at Apex GMAT here and give us a call if we can ever help you.

To work on similar GMAT algebra problem/s see this link: Work Rate Problem.

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similar triangles on the gmat
Posted on
02
Feb 2021

Similar Triangles – GMAT Geometry

By: Rich Zwelling, Apex GMAT Instructor
Date: 2nd February, 2021

One of the most important things to highlight here is that “similar” does not necessarily mean “identical.” Two triangles can be similar without being the same size. For example, take the following:

similar triangles on the GMAT 1

Even though the triangles are of different size, notice that the angles remain the same. This is what really defines the triangles as similar.

Now, what makes this interesting is that the measurements associated with the triangle increase proportionally. For example, if we were to present a triangle with lengths 3, 5, and 7, and we were to then tell you that a similar triangle existed that was twice as large, the corresponding side lengths of that similar triangle would have to be 6, 10, and 14. (This should be no surprise considering our lesson on multiples of Pythagorean triples, such as 3-4-5 leading to 6-8-10, 9-12-15, etc.)

You can also extend this to Perimeter, as perimeter is another one-dimensional measurement. So, if for example we ask:

similar triangles on the GMAT 2

A triangle has line segments XY = 6, YZ = 7, and XZ = 9. If Triangle PQR is similar to Triangle XYZ, and PQ = 18, as shown, then what is the perimeter of Triangle PQR?

Answer: Perimeter is a one-dimensional measurement, just as line segments are. As such, since PQ is three times the length of XY, that means the perimeter of Triangle PQR will be three times the perimeter of Triangle XYZ as well. The perimeter of Triangle XYZ is 6+7+9 = 22. We simply multiply that by 3 to get the perimeter of Triangle PQR, which is 66.

Things can get a little more difficult with area, however, as area is a two-dimensional measurement. If I double the length of each side of a triangle, for example, how does this affect the area? Think about it before reading on…

SCENARIO

Suppose we had a triangle that had a base of 20 and a height of 10:

similar triangles on the GMAT 3

The area would be 20*10 / 2 = 100.

Now, if we double each side of the triangle, what effect does that have on the height? Well, the height is still a one-dimensional measurement (i.e. a line segment), so it also doubles. So the new triangle would have a base of 40 and a height of 20. That would make the area 40*20 / 2 = 400.

Notice that since the original area was 100 and the new area is 400, the area actually quadrupled, even though each side doubled. If the base and height are each multiplied by 2, the area is multiplied by 22. (There’s a connection here to units, since units of area are in square measurements, such as square inches, square meters, or square feet.)

Now, let’s take a look at the following original problem:

Triangle ABC and Triangle DEF are two triangular pens enclosing two separate terrariums. Triangle ABC has side lengths 7 inches, 8 inches, and 10 inches. A beetle is placed along the outer edge of the other terrarium at point D and traverses the entire perimeter once without retracing its path. When finished, it was discovered that the beetle took three times as long as it did traversing the first terrarium traveling at the same average speed in the same manner. What is the total distance, in inches, that the beetle covered between the two terrariums?

A) 25
B) 50
C) 75
D) 100
E) 125

Explanation

This one has a few traps in store. Hopefully you figured out the significance of the beetle taking three times as long to traverse the second terrarium at the same average speed: it’s confirmation that the second terrarium has three times the perimeter of the first. At that point, you can deduce that, since the first terrarium has perimeter 7+8+10 = 25, the second one must have perimeter 25*3 = 75. However, it can be tempting to then choose C, if you don’t read the question closely. Notice the question effectively asks for the perimeters of BOTH terrariums. The correct answer is D.

GMAT Triangle Series Articles:

A Short Meditation on Triangles
The 30-60-90 Right Triangle
The 45-45-90 Right Triangle
The Area of an Equilateral Triangle
Triangles with Other Shapes
Isosceles Triangles and Data Sufficiency
Similar Triangles
3-4-5 Right Triangle
5-12-13 and 7-24-25 Right Triangles

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gmat probability problem article
Posted on
20
Nov 2020

GMAT How-to: Probability Problems

By: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Altea Sulollari
Date: 20th November 2020

GMAT probability questions, which test logical reasoning skills, tend to be quite daunting. The good news is that they don’t appear very frequently; the Quant section contains no more than three or four probability questions. However, since so many test-takers struggle with these questions, mastering probability can be an excellent way to boost your overall score. 

GMAT probability questions aren’t so hard once you’ve grasped the basic concepts. Like the majority of the Quant section, probability questions only cover high school level material. The principle challenge is the tricky wording. 

This article will cover some methods to simplify probability questions and boost your Quant score. 

What Is Probability?

The first step to mastering probability is to break down the basic idea:

Probability = the number of desired outcomes / the total number of outcomes

Or in other words, the chance of something happening is the quotient of the number of desired outcomes and the total number of possible outcomes.

A coin flip is one generic example that can help us understand probability.

There are two possible outcomes when we flip a coin: heads or tails. If we want the coin to land on heads, then we divide 1 (the chance that the coin will land on the desired outcome, heads) by 2 (all possible outcomes, heads and tails), and the result is ½ or 0.5 (50%), meaning that there is a 50% chance that the coin will land on heads.

Although this is an elementary example, it demonstrates the fundamental concept behind all probability problems–a ratio between a part and a whole expressed as a fraction or percentage.

Probability of Independent Events

The probability of x discrete events occurring is the product of all individual probabilities.

For example, imagine that we toss a coin twice. Each toss is independent of the other, meaning that each toss has an equal chance of landing on either heads or tails (0.5). If we want to calculate the chance of getting heads twice in a row, we need to multiply the probability of getting heads the first time by the probability of getting heads the second time. 

Or, represented as an equation:

 ½ x ½ = ¼ 

We get a 0.25 or 25% chance that the coin will land on heads twice. 

Probability of Getting Either A or B

Keep in mind that the sum of all possible events is equal to 1 (100%). 

If we continue with the coin toss example, we know that the probability of landing on heads is 0.5, and that the probability of landing on tails is also 0.5. Therefore:

0.5 + 0.5 = 1

The possibility of landing on either heads or tails is equal to 1, or 100%. In other words, every time we flip a coin, we can be certain that it will land on heads or tails.

Probability Of An Event Not Occurring

Following the concept that the sum of all possible events is 1, we can conclude that the probability of event A not happening (A’) is 1 – A, or equal to the probability of event B occurring.

The chance that the coin will not land on heads is equal to the chance that the coin will land on tails:

1 – 0.5 = 0.5

This method is most useful in situations with many favorable events and fewer unfavorable ones. Since time management is essential on the GMAT, it’s better to avoid solution paths that require more calculations. Subtracting the number of unfavorable events from the whole is quicker and simpler, and thus, less likely to result in mistakes.

Pay Attention to Keywords

Read each problem’s wording with great care to determine exactly which operations to use. 

For example, if the problem uses the word “and,” you need to find the product of the probabilities. If the question uses the word “or,” you need to solve for their sum.

If we flipped one coin and we wanted to know the chances of landing on either heads or tails, we would calculate it like this:

0.5 + 0.5 = 1

Similarly, if we were to toss two coins and we wanted to find the probability of landing on both heads and tails, we would use this equation:

0.5 x 0.5 = 0.25

Avoid Common Errors

Minor errors, such as missing possible events, can lead to incorrect answers.

These pointers will help you avoid some common mistakes on probability questions:

  • List all possible events before starting any calculations;
  • Sum up the probabilities of all possible events to make sure they add up to 1;
  • If there are several different arrangements possible (for example, picking different colored balls from a box), find the probability of one of the events and multiply it by the number of different possible arrangements.

If you enjoyed this article make sure to check out our other How To articles like: Efficient Learning & Verbal section.

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Posted on
30
Jul 2020

Should you include your GMAT score on your resume?

A lot of our clients ask if having a good GMAT score can help you on a job search. The truth is that for some jobs it can be immensely useful. However, other jobs might not even take a look at it. Ultimately, it’s up to the HR departments of your potential employer. Still, there are some rules of thumb to follow. 

A Really Strong Score

Let me first begin by saying that the only time you should list the GMAT on resume is if it’s a really strong score. We’re talking 700 or above. There’s no sense talking about a middling or even middling-good GMAT score if you run the risk of having someone ask: “Well why didn’t you score higher?” Really, the bar is about 700. 

There are a lot of industries that really value it if you put your GMAT on resume and those are going to largely parallel those that value the MBA. Finance, banking, and consulting firms will generally respond favorably to a GMAT score and one of the things to understand about why this is is to understand what the GMAT is and how it factors into a hiring decision. 

GMAT As a Signal

The GMAT’s what’s called a psychometric exam and much like other standardized tests, whether it’s the SAT, the ACT, GRE, LSAT, these tests not just what you know but to varying degrees, how you think and many of the top consulting shops have HR departments that have their own in-house tests. So the GMAT serves as a good proxy for those and signals that you will likely thrive and do well in the testing environment that, let’s say, McKinsey might place you in. 

Understand that a strong GMAT score on a resume immediately says to the recruiter, that you can handle a certain amount of intellectual rigor and then you have a certain amount of liability to the way you think. That’s the value of a GMAT score on a resume, aside from the fact, of course, that it compares you to your peers favorably. 

Include Your GMAT Score Where Necessary

So, as you’re hunting for jobs, whether it’s post-MBA or whether you just took the GMAT and decided not to go to business school or got an alternative degree, think about listing your GMAT on resume and think about it as a talking point for how you overcame an obstacle or in a way that might be complementary to the profile or the narrative that you’re trying to present to a particular hiring manager. I hope this helps and if you have any questions don’t hesitate to contact us!

If you enjoyed this video, you can find more useful GMAT content such as: Everything you need to know about the GMAT and GMAT Prep Tips

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