GMAT vs EA
Posted on
01
Mar 2022

GMAT vs EA – The Differences Between These Exams

GMAT vs EA: What are they?

The Executive Assessment (EA) and the GMAT are both admissions exams designed for MBA or EMBA programs. Both are accepted among most MBA programs, with the GMAT being the gold standard of MBA admissions since its release in 1953. In 2016 GMAC, the company that created the GMAT, released the EA. The EA is specifically tailored towards those applying for Executive MBA (EMBA) programs and those who have spent around a decade in the professional business world. Even though the EA is specifically tailored towards EMBA programs it is being more widely used for MBA program admissions. 

Who takes the EA?

The EA is an exam specifically tailored towards experienced professionals. The EA is shorter, with stringent math sections, and is often considered an easier test. It is meant for those who do not have the time to prepare for the standardized tests for MBA programs. In fact, the GMAC specifies that extensive preparation is not meant for the EA and that the EA is meant for those who have acquired skills and knowledge through work experience. This differs from the GMAT in which we recommend a three-month study plan.

GMAT vs EA: Test Structure 

The structure of the EA is simpler than the GMAT, with only three sections instead of four. Both tests have Quantitative, Verbal, and Integrated reasoning sections, but the GMAT has an additional section, the Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA). The EA also only has 40 questions, compared to the GMAT’s 80. But both have drastically different times with the GMAT taking 3 hours and 7 minutes and the EA taking only 90 minutes. 

All three of the EA’s sections take under fifteen minutes, with the GMAT taking over 30 minutes each on both Verbal and Quantitative sections.

Number of Questions: The EA has 40 questions: 12 Integrated Reasoning, 14 Verbal, and 14 Quantitative. On the other hand, the GMAT has 80 questions: 12 Integrated Reasoning, 36 Verbal, 31 Quantitative questions, and 1 question in the AWA section. 

Time of Each Section: The EA has 30 minutes on each section. Whereas the GMAT has 30 minutes on the Integrated Reasoning, 65 on the Verbal, and 62 on the Quantitative. It gives you 30 minutes for the AWA. 

Types of Questions: The two exams have the same types of questions for every section. 

  • IR: Graphics and Table Analysis, Two-Part Analysis, Multi-Source Reasoning
  • V: Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, Sentence Correlation
  • Q: Data Sufficiency, Problem Solving
  • AWA: The GMAT’s AWA tests your argument analysis skills. 

GMAT vs EA: Scoring 

The EA and GMAT score differently. With the GMAT being a more rigorous test, the scoring ranges from 200-800 while the EA ranges from 100 to 200. In the EA you can score up to a 20 on each section, while GMAT scoring is broken down as follows:

GMAT SCORING
Quant: 0-60
Verbal: 0-60
IR: 1-8
AWA: 1-6

When it comes to the scores of the EA and GMAT remember that a good EA score is about 150 or above, while a good GMAT score is 650 or above. In the EA all the sections are weighted equally, while in the GMAT that is not the case. In the GMAT your AWA score is not weighted as heavily as your Quant or Verbal score. So when studying for both tests you must decide your study habits. In the GMAT you may focus on the Integrative Reasoning section less than the Quantitative for example. It is important to keep in mind where your strengths and weaknesses lie. 

To Review

The EA and GMAT are both exams that can help you get into an MBA or EMBA, so it can be difficult to choose between. However, the GMAC designed the two exams differently for a reason. Understanding why they did so is helpful in choosing which one you would like to take. Recognizing your strengths and weaknesses within testing and your goals within admissions can help you determine which one to take.

 

Contributor: Lukas Duncan

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GMAT How to Prepare
Posted on
15
Feb 2022

How To Prepare For The GMAT – Best Practices

1. Introducing the GMAT

When beginning your GMAT journey, the first step you need to do is figure out why you are taking the GMAT and what your future MBA goals are. If you are hoping to attend a top-tier Business School, like Harvard, this will make your GMAT preparation different compared to a goal of attending a part-time, online MBA program. Keep in mind that effort will still need to be given no matter which program you decide to apply to. Regardless of your ultimate goal, it is important to have your final goal in mind before laying out your GMAT preparation plan. So, once you have established why you are taking the exam, next is creating a plan of how to prepare for the GMAT.

2. Know the GMAT inside and out

One of the first things you want to do is to get comfortable with the GMAT exam and its structures. The GMAT is split up into four sections: 

  1. Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA) → to measure your critical thinking and communication skills
  2. Integrated Reasoning → to measure your data analysis skills
  3. Quantitative Reasoning → to measure your ability to draw conclusions from present data
  4. Verbal Reasoning → to measure your reading, evaluation, and correction skills in standard English 

By splitting up the GMAT into its four main sections, you can begin your preparation process more fluidly. Recognize your strengths and weaknesses in each of these sections and dedicate yourself to strengthening your weaknesses and solidifying your strengths. In order to know where you stand with the GMAT, we always suggest taking a practice exam before beginning to prepare. This will give you a baseline knowledge of where you stand with each section of the exam. 

3. Lay out a 3-month GMAT study plan

GMAT 3 Month Study PlanIdeally, you give yourself 3-months to study for the exam. We have created a 3-month study plan which can be used by most test-takers when beginning their GMAT journey. Ultimately, giving yourself 3-months means you have room to get to know every aspect of the exam. Give yourself less than 3-months and you will be hindering your chances of success. We suggest finding the date of your GMAT exam (giving yourself an extra week or two for a retake – just in case) and counting backwards by 3 months. Then, mark your calendar in the following way: 

During your study plan, it is important that you make time for stress relief. Do not let the GMAT preparation process consume you. Being stressed will do you no favors in the long run and could even negatively impact your overall GMAT score

4. It’s okay to ask for help

Believe it or not, we expect successful GMAT test takers to have asked for help during their journey. Whether it is from their friends or family or even hiring a private GMAT tutor, many people who achieve a 700+ GMAT score do so because they have had some sort of help. Even asking a previous GMAT test taker how to prepare for the GMAT can be a huge help! A private GMAT tutor, for example, can help you achieve GMAT success by working with you in a myriad of ways.

Whether it is by helping you to strengthen your weaknesses or fortifying your strengths, a good GMAT tutor will be able to recognize where you need help and how best to help you. Make sure that, if you need help you don’t wait until the last minute to ask for it. Be ready to ask for help as soon as you begin your studies. 

5. Be confident and remember your goal

It is common practice for people who take the GMAT to question their rationale for undertaking such a journey. The GMAT is not supposed to be an easy exam (if it was easy, then everyone would do it!). But you are one of those select few who choose to go down this difficult path. We suggest surrounding yourself with a strong support network. Stress reduction is also hugely important during this journey, be careful not to get burned out too soon as this can ultimately hinder your GMAT exam process. 

Final Thoughts

We here at Apex know the difficulty of figuring out how to prepare for the GMAT exam. We work with clients from a variety of different backgrounds and tutor them to GMAT success. Whether you are about to begin your GMAT journey or are already two months in, we are in the business of helping anyone who wants to achieve an elite GMAT score. We offer 30-minute complimentary consultation calls with one of our top-scoring instructors. 

 

Contributor: Dana Coggio

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GMAT Exam
Posted on
30
Dec 2021

Before Taking The GMAT Exam, You Should Do These 3 Things

Imagine that you wake up on a sunny day, you feel energized and positive about where your day is headed, and you have a plan in your head on how to organize your time efficiently so that you can begin preparing for your GMAT exam. Then, suddenly, you realize that you only have a few days left before your GMAT exam date. You start overthinking about what you know or don’t know about the exam, its procedure, the dos and don’ts, and you feel yourself getting stressed. This is a normal feeling for most people who have exams coming up and feel like they lost track of time. But no need to panic – We gotcha!  Here are a few things you can do to help with the process.

1. Get yourself accustomed to the GMAT exam procedure

It is of utmost importance that you know the GMAT exam procedure by heart before taking the test. This can help by making sure the exam goes smoothly and you don’t get worried about making silly mistakes.

So, how is the GMAT structured and what are its procedures?

Here is a brief recap. The GMAT has 4 sections:

The total time it takes to complete the GMAT, with breaks, is usually 3.5 hours. If you’re interested in knowing how the scoring of the GMAT goes, you can watch this short and comprehensive YouTube video.

2. Take the GMAT practice exam during the same time as the real one

Having routines in life helps us manage our time efficiently. The same can be said for the GMAT exam. It is crucial that you know what time your real exam is going to be so that you can start preparing and practicing during the same time of the day. Why is this important? Let’s say you usually wake up at 11:00 AM and start studying around 1:00 PM. If your exam starts at 10:00 AM, you’re going to have a hard time functioning to the best of your abilities. Thus, it is suggested that you create a routine around your exam time so that your brain and body can get used to it.

3. Revise your previous GMAT mistakes, but don’t acquire new knowledge

Cramming in new information a few days before taking the GMAT does not usually result in effective learning. It is a student’s habit to start learning new material at midnight, but this will not help you solidify your knowledge. Your GMAT exam procedure needs practice and time, and you simply cannot learn new things in a span of a few hours. That is why it is better to go over what you have learned thus far, which will help in remembering what you already know. If this makes you feel like you have to have a plan, that is great! You can start with study plans months or even a year beforehand. Take a look at this 3-Month GMAT Guide to help you start your journey with preparing for the GMAT.

Final Thoughts

It is often easy to get stressed before the exam and lose track of time. To feel prepared to take the GMAT, it is advised that you get accustomed to the exam procedure, take the practice exam during the same time as the real one, and revise your previous mistakes, but don’t try to acquire new knowledge a day or two out. These are only a few GMAT tips to help you feel more confident about the big day, for more, you can check out our other articles. 

Some people feel more assured about taking the GMAT when they have instructors. If you can do it on your own, then good job! If you are thinking about having an instructor help you with the GMAT, you can sign up for a complimentary consultation call. Our tutors at APEX have all scored 770+ and are professional in the field. In this consultation call, they will guide you in your GMAT journey. Rest assured, you will be in good hands!

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Posted on
15
Jul 2021

10 Things To Consider Before You Begin Your GMAT Prep

1. Get Comfortable With The GMAT Structure

Before doing anything else, you need to familiarise yourself with the GMAT structure.

     1- Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA section)

This section concentrates on critical analysis and idea communication. You will be presented with an argument where a strong analysis of the reasoning behind the given argument should be provided. (30 minutes, 1 question)

     2- Integrated Reasoning (IR section)

The second part of the exam evaluates the ability to assess information and interpret data displayed in different formats. (30 minutes, 12 questions) 

    3- Quantitative Reasoning (Quant section)

This section measures the ability to solve mathematical and quantitative problems as well as the ability to interpret data. There are two types of questions in the Quantitative Section – Problem Solving and Data Sufficiency. Both types of questions require some knowledge of arithmetic, elementary algebra, and commonly known geometry concepts. Since there are 31 questions in Quantitative Reasoning, about 15 of them will be data sufficiency questions which are quite confusing and unique. (62 minutes, 31 questions)

     4-Verbal Reasoning (Verbal section)

This is the final section, which evaluates reading comprehension skills, editing abilities, and whether you can make sense of written arguments. (65 minutes, 36 questions)

2. GMAT Scores are Valid for Five Years

You will receive your official GMAT score within 20 days of taking the exam. Your GMAT test score is valid for five years. Before taking or preparing for the GMAT, it is essential to know when to take the exam. If you already have a particular school or program in mind then you have to schedule your test based on the deadlines the school has specified. Nevertheless, it is good to keep in mind how long GMAT scores are valid for if you are uncertain about when you will apply to schools.

3. Two Sections of the GMAT are Computer-Adaptive

The GMAT is a Computer Adaptive exam. Two sections of GMAT, the Quantitative and Verbal Reasoning sections are Computer-adaptive. So, what does it mean? If you answered a hard level question correctly the next question will be more complex. If you answered a question wrong then the other question will be easier. In these sections, the difficulty of the questions take into consideration the number of questions that you previously answered correctly or incorrectly.  

4. Take a Practice Test Before Starting Preparation for the GMAT Exam

Before starting the preparation for the GMAT exam, take a GMAT practice test to find out your baseline, how well prepared you are, and how far off you are from your target score. In this way, you will get familiar with the question types and style and understand the time frame. Via this method, you can compare your starting point versus the ending when you take the actual GMAT exam.  

5. Familiarize Yourself with the Style and Format of the Exam

The GMAT exam is different from other exams such as SAT, TOEFL, ACT. You need to become familiar with the format of the questions so that during the exam, you won’t allocate too much time to understanding the questions. Some GMAT sections have unique question types that might confuse the test-takers, such as the quantitative (data sufficiency) and integrated reasoning sections where some questions will require more than one response. You will save time and feel comfortable with the questions if you know them beforehand—especially the data sufficiency questions from the quantitative section. 

6. Practice Without a Calculator

The GMAT exam doesn’t allow calculators on the Quant section. This may sound tough, but in actuality, it is for the best since you need to train your mind and mental math to solve the problems. It may also indicate that the problems aren’t that complex and that you can solve them without using a calculator. However, working without a calculator is challenging since you need to carefully check your calculations after every step to ensure you don’t have errors. Therefore, to prepare yourself for this challenge, try practicing from the beginning without a calculator. Instead, become familiar with what it feels like and gain experience using the math problems by hand. Another trick that can help you during this process is familiarizing yourself with the GMAT tips you can use while solving the GMAT questions.

10 gmat tips7. Define your Strengths and Weaknesses

This analysis will help you know what you are good at and what you need to improve. First of all, plan your strategy about how you are going to analyze your weaknesses and strengths. It can be by taking the GMAT practice exam once and then figuring out which areas you felt particularly weak or strong in. Another option is to maintain a notebook for a week and mark down the weaknesses and strengths you encounter during your initial studying. Via this analysis, you might get a sense of whether you are good at time management, what your speed is, and much more. During the analysis, try to identify which question types are the most challenging for you in each section. Figure out what soft skills you have that might help you during the exam and pinpoint the ones that need improvement. After that, conclude and start working on developing new skills and overcoming weaknesses. Always keep in mind having an achievable goal for the final target as a score. Scoring a 700 or higher on the GMAT isn’t always easy! 

8. Design a Study Plan

After acknowledging your strengths and weaknesses, design a personalized study plan to guide you throughout your preparation, decide what sources and courses you need, whether you are going to prepare only with tests, or go step by step through topics and sections. Schedule your learning format and decide which strategy fits the best with your prep level. You might also consider taking courses with a GMAT private tutor, with which you will get a lot of help and guidance in your GMAT preparation creed.

9. Keep Track of Time

When preparing for the GMAT exam try to keep track of your time to allocate it equally to each section. However, do this step after you have identified what concepts are complicated for you in order to allocate more time on those topics and train yourself to solve those problems. Practice pacing because GMAT time management is critical in order to complete the exam. The worst scenario in the GMAT exam is that sometimes the test takers run out of time towards the end. This is because some of the test takers do not stick with the time and fall behind. Thus, set and stick to certain time milestones to finish the exam on time.

10. Keep Going, Do Not Get Stuck on a Question

It is also essential to remember that you don’t need to answer every question correctly and that completing the exam is most important. This is because your score will decrease if you do not complete the sections of the GMAT. 2 minutes is more than enough for each question. So, if you are stuck, make an educated guess and move on to another question. 

Conclusion

In conclusion, before preparing for the GMAT exam, first, know about the GMAT exam structure and familiarize yourself with the format and style, then take a practice test to find out your score as well as your weaknesses and strengths. After that, design your study plan and hit the green light! Of course, while practicing for the GMAT exam, try not to use a calculator, keep track of time and concentrate on learning rather than answering all the questions correctly. Finally, consider having a GMAT tutor along the way, should you think having a professional guiding you throughout the process is an effective way for you to succeed. 

 

Contributor: Simona Mkhitaryan

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