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Posted on
21
Jul 2021

GMAT 3D Geometry Problem – GMAT Math – Quant Section

GMAT 3D Geometry Problem 

In this problem we’re going to take a look at 3D objects and in particular a special problem type on the GMAT that measures the longest distance within a three-dimensional object. Typically, they give you rectangular solids, but they can also give you cylinders and other such objects. The key thing to remember about problems like this one is that effectively we’re stacking Pythagorean theorems to solve it – we’re finding triangles and then triangles within triangles that define the longest distance.

This type of problem is testing your spatial skills and a graphic or visual aid is often helpful though strictly not necessary. Let’s take a look at how to solve this problem and because it’s testing these skills the approach is generally mathematical that is there is some processing because it’s secondary to what they’re actually testing.

gmat 3d geometry question

GMAT 3D Geometry Problem Introduction

So, we have this rectangular solid and it doesn’t matter which way we turn it – the longest distance is going to be between any two opposite corners and you can take that to the bank as a rule: On a rectangular solid the opposite corners will always be the longest distance. Here we don’t have any way to process this central distance so, what we need to do is make a triangle out of it.

Notice that the distance that we’re looking for along with the height of 5 and the hypotenuse of the 10 by 10 base will give us a right triangle. We can apply Pythagoras here if we have the hypotenuse of the base. We’re working backwards from what we need to what we can make rather than building up. Once you’re comfortable with this you can do it in either direction.

Solving the Problem

In this case we’ve got a 10 by 10 base. It’s a 45-45-90 because any square cut in half is a 45-45-90 which means we can immediately engage the identity of times root two. So, 10, 10, 10 root 2. 10 root 2 and 5 makes the two sides. We apply Pythagoras again. Here it’s a little more complicated mathematically and because you’re going in and out of taking square roots and adding and multiplying, you want to be very careful not to make a processing error here.

Careless errors abound particularly when we’re distracted from the math and yet we need to do some processing. So, this is a point where you just want to say “Okay, I’ve got all the pieces, let me make sure I do this right.” 10 root 2 squared is 200 (10 times 10 is 100, root 2 times root 2 is 2, 2 times 100 is 200). 5 squared is 25. Add them together 225. And then take the square root and that’s going to give us our answer. The square root of 225 is one of those numbers we should know. It’s 15, answer choice A.

Okay guys for another 3D and Geometry problem check out GMAT 680 Level Geometry Problem – No Math Needed! We will see you next time.

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Intro to GMAT data sufficiency article
Posted on
20
Apr 2021

Intro to GMAT Data Sufficiency- All you’ll need to know

By: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Altea Sulollari
Date: 20th April 2021

As a GMAT test-taker, you are probably familiar with data sufficiency problems. These are one of the two question types that you will come across in the GMAT quant section, and you will find up to 10 of them on the exam. The rest of the 31 questions will be problem-solving questions.

The one thing that all GMAT data-sufficiency questions have in common is their structure. That is what essentially sets them apart from the problem-solving questions. 

Keep on reading to find out more about these questions’ particular structures and the topics that they cover:

The question structure:

The GMAT data sufficiency problems have a very particular structure that they follow and that never changes. You are presented with a question and 2 different statements. You will also be given 5 answer choices that remain the same across all data sufficiency problems on the GMAT exam. These answer questions are the following:

A) Statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2) alone is not sufficient.
B)
Statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (1) alone is not sufficient.
C) BOTH statements TOGETHER are sufficient, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient.
D) EACH statement ALONE is sufficient.
E) Statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are NOT sufficient.

Your job would be to determine whether the 2 statements that you are provided with are sufficient to answer the question.

What topics are covered?

Some of the math topics that you will see in this type of question are concepts from high school arithmetic, geometry and algebra.

Below, you’ll find a list of all concepts you need to know for each math topic:

Geometry

  • Circles
  • Angles
  • Lines
  • Triangles
  • Coordinate geometry
  • Polygons
  • Surface area
  • Volume

Algebra

  • Functions
  • Equations
  • Inequalities
  • Exponents
  • Algebraic expressions
  • Polynomials
  • Permutations and combinations

Arithmetic

  • Basic statistics
  • Real numbers
  • Number theory
  • Fractions
  • Percentages
  • Decimals
  • Probability
  • Integer properties
  • Power and root

Word problems

  • Sets
  • Profit
  • Percentage
  • Ratio
  • Rate
  • Interest
  • Mixtures

Common mistakes people make when dealing with this question type

Actually solving the question

This is the #1 mistake most test-takers make with these problems. These problems are not meant to be solved. Instead, you will only need to set up the problem and not execute it. That is also more time-efficient for you and will give you some extra minutes that you can use to solve other questions. 

Over-calculating

This relates to the first point we made. This question type requires you to determine whether the data you have is sufficient to solve the problem. In that case, calculating won’t help you determine that. On the contrary, over-calculating will eat up your precious minutes.

Rushing

This is yet another common mistake that almost everyone is guilty of. You will have to spend just enough time reading through the question in order to come up with a solution. Rushing through it won’t help you do that, and you will probably miss out on essential details that would otherwise make your life easier. 

Not understanding the facts

What most test-takers fail to consider is that the fact lies in the 2 statements that are included in the questions. Those are the only facts that you have to consider as true and use in your question-solving process. 

3 tips to master this question type:

Review the fundamentals

That is the first step you need to go through before going in for actual practice tests. Knowing that you will encounter these high school math fundamentals in every single quant problem, is enough to convince anyone to review and revise everything beforehand.

Memorize the answer choices

This might sound a bit intimidating at first as most answer choices are very long sentences that tend to be similar to each other in content. However, there is a way to make this easier for you. What you need to do is synthesize the answer choices into simpler and more manageable options. That way, they will be easier to remember. This is what we suggest:

A) Only statement 1
B)
Only statement 2
C) Both statements together
D) Either statement
E) Neither statement

Examine each statement separately

That is definitely the way to go with this GMAT question. You will need to determine whether one of the statements, both, either, or neither is sufficient, and you cannot do that unless you look at each of them separately first.

Now that you have read the article and are well-aware of the best ways to solve data sufficiency problems on the GMAT, try your hand at this question: Number Theory: Data Sufficiency

 

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Posted on
20
Nov 2020

GMAT How-to: Probability Problems

GMAT probability questions, which test logical reasoning skills, tend to be quite daunting. The good news is that they don’t appear very frequently; the Quant section contains no more than three or four probability questions. However, since so many test-takers struggle with these questions, mastering probability can be an excellent way to boost your overall score. 

GMAT probability questions aren’t so hard once you’ve grasped the basic concepts. Like the majority of the Quant section, probability questions only cover high school level material. The principal challenge is the tricky wording. 

This article will cover some methods to simplify probability questions and boost your Quant score. 

What Is Probability?

The first step to mastering probability is to break down the basic idea:

Probability = the number of desired outcomes / the total number of outcomes

Or in other words, the chance of something happening is the quotient of the number of desired outcomes and the total number of possible outcomes.

A coin flip is one generic example that can help us understand probability.

There are two possible outcomes when we flip a coin: heads or tails. If we want the coin to land on heads, then we divide 1 (the chance that the coin will land on the desired outcome, heads) by 2 (all possible outcomes, heads and tails), and the result is ½ or 0.5 (50%), meaning that there is a 50% chance that the coin will land on heads.

Although this is an elementary example, it demonstrates the fundamental concept behind all probability problems–a ratio between a part and a whole expressed as a fraction or percentage.

Probability of Independent Events

The probability of x discrete events occurring is the product of all individual probabilities.

For example, imagine that we toss a coin twice. Each toss is independent of the other, meaning that each toss has an equal chance of landing on either heads or tails (0.5). If we want to calculate the chance of getting heads twice in a row, we need to multiply the probability of getting heads the first time by the probability of getting heads the second time. 

Or, represented as an equation:

 ½ x ½ = ¼ 

We get a 0.25 or 25% chance that the coin will land on heads twice. 

Probability of Getting Either A or B

Keep in mind that the sum of all possible events is equal to 1 (100%). 

If we continue with the coin toss example, we know that the probability of landing on heads is 0.5, and that the probability of landing on tails is also 0.5. Therefore:

0.5 + 0.5 = 1

The possibility of landing on either heads or tails is equal to 1, or 100%. In other words, every time we flip a coin, we can be certain that it will land on heads or tails.

Probability Of An Event Not Occurring

Following the concept that the sum of all possible events is 1, we can conclude that the probability of event A not happening (A’) is 1 – A, or equal to the probability of event B occurring.

The chance that the coin will not land on heads is equal to the chance that the coin will land on tails:

1 – 0.5 = 0.5

This method is most useful in situations with many favorable events and fewer unfavorable ones. Since time management is essential on the GMAT, it’s better to avoid solution paths that require more calculations. Subtracting the number of unfavorable events from the whole is quicker and simpler, and thus, less likely to result in mistakes.

Pay Attention to Keywords

Read each problem’s wording with great care to determine exactly which operations to use. 

For example, if the problem uses the word “and,” you need to find the product of the probabilities. If the question uses the word “or,” you need to solve for their sum.

If we flipped one coin and we wanted to know the chances of landing on either heads or tails, we would calculate it like this:

0.5 + 0.5 = 1

Similarly, if we were to toss two coins and we wanted to find the probability of landing on both heads and tails, we would use this equation:

0.5 x 0.5 = 0.25

Avoid Common Errors

Minor errors, such as missing possible events, can lead to incorrect answers.

These pointers will help you avoid some common mistakes on probability questions:

  • List all possible events before starting any calculations;
  • Sum up the probabilities of all possible events to make sure they add up to 1;
  • If there are several different arrangements possible (for example, picking different colored balls from a box), find the probability of one of the events and multiply it by the number of different possible arrangements.

If you enjoyed this article make sure to check out our other How To articles like: Efficient Learning & Verbal section.

 

Contributor: Altea Sulollari
Date: 20th November 2020

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