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Posted on
01
Sep 2021

Additional Voters – GMAT Quant Problem

Additional Voters – GMAT Quant Problem

Hey guys, today we’re going to look at a particularly challenging GMAT Quant problem that just about everyone resorts to an algebraic solution path on, but there’s a very elegant part solution path. When we take a look at this problem we observe immediately that the difficulty is that we have no baseline for the number of voters that we start with. That’s the confusing part here and this is one of the ways that the GMAT modulates difficulty; when they give us a problem without fixed numbers, and where we’re not free to run a scenario because there are add-on numbers that change the relative values.

Additional Voters Problem Introduction

GMAT Quant Problem

Here they’re adding the 500 and the 600 which means there exist fixed values at the beginning, but we don’t know what they are. What we want to do here is remove ourselves a bit from the problem and let the ratios that they give us guide our way.

We start out with three parts Republicans, five parts Democrats. These eight parts constitute everything, but we don’t know how many voters are in each part – it could be one voter in each, or a hundred, or a thousand, and we can’t speculate yet. So, what we need to do is not worry about it, and this is where a lot of people get really uncomfortable. Let it go for a second, and notice that, after we add all the new voters, we end up with an extra part on the Republican side and the same number of parts on the Democrat side.

What does this mean? Well, the parts are obviously getting bigger from the before to the after. But because we have an overall equivalence between the number of parts we can actually reverse engineer the solution out of this.

Reverse Engineering the Solution

We’re adding 500 Democrats and we’re maintaining five parts from the before to the after. This means that each part is getting an extra 100 voters for the total of plus 500. On the Republican side, we’re adding 600 voters. We already know, from the Democratic side, that each part needs to increase by 100 to keep pace with all the other parts. So, 300 voters are used in the three republican parts, leaving 300 extra voters to constitute the entirety of the fourth part.

Now we know that each part after we add the voters equals 300 and therefore each part before we added the voters was 200. From there we get our answer choice. I forget what they were asking us at this point, and this is actually a really great moment because it’s very common on these complex problems to get so caught up, even if you’re doing it mentally, with a more conducive solution path, to forget what’s being asked. When you’re doing math on paper, which is something we really don’t recommend, it’s even easier to do so because you get so involved processing the numbers in front of you that you lose conceptual track of what the problem is about.

So, they’re asking for the difference between the Democratic and Republican voters after the voters are added. Now we know there’s one part difference and we know that after voters are added a part equals 300 voters so the answer choice is B, 300.

Something to Keep in Mind

This one is not easy to get your head around, but it’s easier than dealing with the mess of algebra that you’d otherwise have to do.
Review this one again. This is a GMAT Quant problem you may have to review several days in a row. It’s one where you might attain an understanding, and then when you revisit it four hours later or the next day, you lose it and you have to fight for it again. It’s in this process of dense contact and fighting that same fight over and over again that you will slowly internalize this way of looking at it, which is one that is unpracticed. The challenge in this problem isn’t that it’s so difficult. It’s that it utilizes solution pads and way of thinking that we weren’t taught in school and that is entirely unpracticed. So, much of what you see as less difficult on the GMAT is less difficult only because you’ve been practicing it in one form or another since you were eight years old. So, don’t worry if you have to review this again and I hope this was helpful.

Check out this link for another super challenging GMAT Quant problem.

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Posted on
11
Aug 2021

GMAT Markup Problem – GMAT Data Sufficiency

Hey guys, today we’re going to take a look at a typically characteristic data sufficiency problem that gives us a relationship, and then asks us if we have enough to compute the final value of that relationship. There’s an algebraic solution path here, where they give us the equation and we need to see if we have all but one of the variables, that final variable being the one that they’re asking for. We can also do this via parts, scenario, and graphically, and we’ll take a look at all those as well.

GMAT Markup Problem Introduction

GMAT Markup Problem

This problem describes to us the relationship between the selling price, the cost, and the markup. And notice that, while we’re going to sketch it out here, the actual relationship doesn’t matter to us – all that matters is that if they’re asking for one term in terms of the rest if we have the other terms, that’ll be enough.

Algebraically we have selling price S equals the cost C plus the markup M. So this is giving us the markup in, let’s say dollar terms, whereas we might also set this up as selling price equals cost times one plus the markup percentage. And here we just have that notational shift. So, what we’re looking for, if we want to know the markup relative to the selling price, is an understanding of it either relative to the selling price or relative to the cost. That is, these two things are associated and the markup, when associated with the cost, gives us a ratio. Where the markup, when associated with the selling price, is a fraction. And if you’ll remember notationally these things are expressed differently, but conceptually there’s the same math behind it.

Statement 1

Number one gives us in percentage terms the mark up compared to the cost. So, here we can see it as 25% more and this is where it ties into that second version of the algebraic one we just looked at. The cost we can break up into four parts of 25% so that when we add the markup that’s a fifth part. Therefore, the markup comprises one-fifth or 20% of the selling price.

Statement 2

Number two provides us a concrete selling price but doesn’t tell us anything about the markup or the mix of cost versus markup as a percentage of the total selling price. Two is insufficient on its own, and as we’ve seen in many other data sufficiency problems, what they’re trying to do here is fool us into thinking we need a specific price, a discrete value to get sufficiency. When the question stem is asking us only for a relative value and when we’re being asked for a relative value, a percentage, a fraction, a ratio be on the lookout for fooling yourself into thinking that you need an anchor point a specific discrete value.

I hope this helps. If you enjoyed this GMAT Markup Problem, try your hand at this Triangle DS Problem.

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Posted on
04
Aug 2021

GMAT Abstract Data Sufficiency Problem

Abstract Data Sufficiency Problems & Scenarios

Hi guys! Abstract data sufficiency problems tend to really lend themselves to running scenarios – It doesn’t matter if it’s an abstract inequality or a number theory problem, really anytime you’ve got variables thrown into the question stimulus on a DS problem, scenarios is a good way to go. Now your scenarios can be discrete actual numbers that you throw in there, but you can also leverage rules and have more conceptual-level scenarios. We’re going to take a look at both in this problem.

Problem Introduction

We’re being asked here for the evenness or oddness of n which is an integer. At first blush, we’re going to say, “Well, if we have the evenness or oddness of any expression involving n and n alone, we should be able to backtrack it to n.” If you don’t see that then you might fall into the trap of having to go much more deeply into it and figure out “Well, what if n is this, what if n is that?” But notice here that because we’re dealing with evens and odds there are a set of identities that govern every possible addition, or multiplication, subtraction, or division of evens and odds. So, as long as there’s nothing complicating it the expression itself will be enough.

Statement 1

Taking a look at the introduced information, number one gives us n2 + 1 is odd that means that n2 is even. How do we know without numbers? If n2 + 1 is odd then adjusting it down by one, removing that one, means we’re definitely going to get to an even, because the number line is just even, odd, even, odd, even, odd all the way up. So, we have n2 is even, and only even times even gives us an even. Odd times odd doesn’t, odd times odd gives us an odd.

So, n must be even if the square of it leads us to an even. Notice again, that we don’t need to do any of that, it’s enough just to say we’ve got n in an expression, and we have its evenness and oddness.

Statement 2

Number two works the same way. 3n + 4 is even that’s enough, no more to do, but if we want to we can adjust that 3n – 4 as even down by 4 notches (odd, even, odd, even). So 3n is even and then we know that n divided by 3, that is what is an even divided by 3, will give us n. An even divided by an odd is going to always be an even, for the same reason even times an odd is always going to be an even.

Run some scenarios here, start out with an even number; let’s do 6, 50, and 120. Divide each by 3; 2 (6/3=2), 50 divided by 3 doesn’t work, 40 (120/3=40). So on the two that do work, we get to even numbers. 50 is not allowed to be used as a scenario because we’re told that n – 3 has to be an integer which means, that 3n must also be an integer; that is 3n is a multiple of 3. Since 50 is not a multiple of 3 it’s not a potential 3n. Take a minute with that one, because it’s kind of looking at everything in reverse.

So here we have two different expressions that both give us evenness and oddness, they both work independently. The answer choice is D – each alone is sufficient.

If you enjoyed this problem, try your hand at these Data Sufficiency Problems GMAT Trade Show Problem & Area of a Triangle Problem.

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Posted on
28
Jul 2021

GMAT Trade Show Problem – Data Sufficiency

GMAT Trade Show Problem Introduction

Today we’re going to take a look at the Trade Show Problem and this is a GMAT Data Sufficiency problem with averages as the focal point. But really the concept of average is distracting from this problem. So, if we take a look at the question stimulus, we want to figure out what we need, but we need to synthesize some of the information there to understand what we know.

We’re being asked whether or not it gets above a certain threshold an average of 90, and over six days that’s going to be over a total of 540 points. Notice how I did it mathematically, you can represent it graphically as a rectangle, but 90 times 6 is that 540 points. We know though that all of our days at a minimum are 80 which means we can build up from that piece of knowledge. We have 80 x 6 = 480 points and we want to know if we have more or less than 60 points above that minimum that we’re already working with that’s what we need.

Solving the GMAT Problem

Ways we might get it include any number of slices and dices for the performance of the rest of the days and the difficulty of this problem in large part will be dependent on how convoluted the GMAT gives us the introduced information on number one and two.

When we look at number one, we’re told that the final four days average out to a hundred. Once again, like with other average problems, each of the individual four days the performance doesn’t matter. We can just say each is exactly 100 and make that assumption, which means each is 20 over – we’re 80 points over the mean. Because we want to know whether we are more or less than 60 points, this knowledge that we’re 100 points tells us “Yes, definitively. We are over that average of 90, we’re over that surplus of 60 points.” So, number one is sufficient.

Number two gives us the opposite information, it talks about the minimum, and, in aggregate, that doesn’t let us know directly whether or not we make those 60 points. That is it’s possible but it’s also possible that we don’t, because we’re dealing with a minimum rather than a maximum or rather we’re dealing with information that can lie on either side of what we need. Therefore 2 is insufficient. Our answer here is A.

I hope that was useful. GMAT nation stay strong, keep averaging. You guys got this! I believe in you. If you want to test your GMAT Data Sufficiency skills, check out the Science Fair problem.

 

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GMAT Calculator & Mental Math - All You Need To Know
Posted on
27
Jul 2021

GMAT Calculator & Mental Math – All You Need To Know

Author: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Ilia Dobrev
Date: 27 July, 2021

Are you allowed to use a calculator on the GMAT? While this may seem as a pretty straightforward question to answer, it does deserve a separate blog post as it hides details that are vital for achieving a top GMAT score not only on the quantitative section, but on the exam as a whole.

Well, the answer is both Yes and No. This article aims to examine the different scenarios where you are allowed to use such a device and how you can make full use of its potential. But, if you are used to doing math with a calculator, do not worry as we have compiled a list of some mental math techniques that you can use to your advantage and even save much important time while still being spot-on with your answers.

Calculator on the GMAT | Explained

  • You are not allowed to bring your own calculator to the GMAT exam.
    According to the GMAC, no personal items are allowed in the exam room of any of the certified test centers.
  • You cannot use a calculator on the Quantitative section of the GMAT.
    Despite the fact that we are so used to using calculators to help us with arithmetic operations, you should not feel intimidated that you are not allowed to use any type of calculator on the GMAT Quantitative section. However, you will be provided with a blank canvas by the proctor of the exam where you will have plenty of space to practice to manually compute any calculations, if needed.

You should not worry as the GMAT exam is not designed to test you on complicated mathematical operations or complex calculations. Instead, the quant section draws from secondary-level math skills like basic algebra and geometry, which are mastered in high school, to test other kinds of abilities like critical thinking, logical reasoning, and problem-solving. In fact, the majority of the Quant questions can (and should) be answered without any calculations beyond estimation. A typical example of how you can use mental math to get to the right answer while saving precious time on the GMAT is the Movie Night combinatorics problem. Another type of common GMAT quant questions are data sufficiency problems, which are also more about reasoning than  calculations. You’ll only need to do basic calculations and can rely on estimation for anything more complicated. If you have to do the math, the GMAC usually keeps the numbers simple and avoids decimals. When you see large numbers or complex fractions, then it’s a good bet that there’s an easier solution path to embark on other than calculating.

Surprisingly or not, a calculator will be provided for use during the GMAT Integrated Reasoning section of the test. This GMAT calculator has the standard basic functions, CE (clear entry) button, C (clear) button, an sqrt function, a % (percentage) button, and a 1/x button that calculates the reciprocal of the entry currently on the screen. Also, there is a row with the standard memory functions

  • MS (memory store) stores the current entry in the calculator’s memory for subsequent use.
  • MR (memory recall) displays the latest number stored in the calculator’s memory so that it can be used for the next calculations.
  • M+ (memory addition) adds the current entry to the value that is currently stored in the calculator’s memory. This button is helpful when you need to add a long series of numbers and don’t want to retype each one.
  • MC (memory clear) erases whatever is in the current memory. You should click this button before every new calculation scenario.

Improve your Mental Math and reduce your Calculator Dependency

Survival Tips & Tricks

Do not overuse the IR calculator.

While you are provided with a basic GMAT calculator during the Integrated Reasoning section, you might not want to use it too often as you’ll waste more time than you’ll save. You can also apply the solution paths you are using in the Quant section to some problems in the Integrated Reasoning section.

Constantly practice Mental Math operations.

A huge morale boost is that mental math operations are easy to learn with some practice. You can add, multiply, subtract, and divide when you pay bills, check out at the grocery store, calculate a tip, etc. without using a calculator.

Make accurate estimations

The key to saving a considerable amount of time on the GMAT exam is efficiency in estimations. Transform numbers to less unwieldy figures like 0 or 5 for the purpose of calculations. You can then browse the answer choices to see which is closest to your preliminary estimate.

Do not use a calculator when you are prepping for the GMAT quant section.

This is a great way to practice mental math operations outside the daily life operations. The test setting and quant context will let you get used to this environment so that you know what to expect on test day.

Familiarize yourself with a basic GMAT calculator and do use its Memory functions.

As this will be your only technical aid during the GMAT Integrated Reasoning section, you’d better spend some time making the most out of it. Especially when you are pressed by time, memorizing calculated values for further operations in the calculator’s memory can be crucial for staying on track with a healthy exam pace.

Guide yourself by looking at the answer choices.

Looking at the answer choices can immediately permit you to eliminate a couple of options. Even if you are pushed by time, you can easily make a more educated decision depending on your reasoning that will boost the chances of picking the correct answer.

Do not freak out if you see large numbers.

Remember that the people who stand behind the GMAT are aware that they are designing questions that are supposed to be answered without using a calculator. This also keeps the arithmetic from being too difficult and gives you the opportunity to apply a more straightforward approach.

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GMAT Quant Syllabus 2021-2022
Posted on
22
Jul 2021

GMAT Quant Syllabus 2021-2022

Author: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Altea Sollulari
Date: 22 July, 2021

We know what you’re thinking: math is a scary subject and not everyone can excel at it. And now with the GMAT the stakes are much higher, especially because there is a whole section dedicated to math that you need to prepare for in order to guarantee a good score. There is good news though, the GMAT is not actually testing your math skills, but rather your creative problem solving skills through math questions. Furthermore, the GMAT only requires that you have sound knowledge of high school level mathematics. So, you just need to practice your fundamentals and learn how to use them to solve specific GMAT problems and find solution paths that work to your advantage. 

The Quantitative Reasoning section on the GMAT contains a total of 31 questions, and you are given 62 minutes to complete all of them. This gives you just 2 minutes to solve each question, so in most cases, the regular way of solving math equations that you were taught in high school will not cut it. So finding the optimal problem solving process for each question type is going to be pivotal to your success in this section. This can seem a daunting start, so our expert Apex GMAT instructors recommend that you start your quant section prep with a review of the types of GMAT questions asked in the test and math fundamentals if you have not been using high school math in your day to day life. 

What types of questions will you find in the GMAT quant?

There are 2 main types of questions you should look out for when preparing to take the GMAT exam:

Data Sufficiency Questions

For this type of GMAT question, you don’t generally need to do calculations. However, you will have to determine whether the information that is provided to you is sufficient to answer the question. These questions aim to evaluate your critical thinking skills. 

They generally contain a question, 2 statements, and 5 answer choices that are the same in all GMAT data sufficiency questions.

Here’s an example of a number theory data sufficiency problem video, where Mike explains the best way to go about solving such a question.

Problem Solving Questions

This question type is pretty self-explanatory: you’ll have to solve the question and come up with a solution. However, you’ll be given 5 answer choices to choose from. Generally, the majority of questions in the quant section of the GMAT will be problem-solving questions as they clearly show your abilities to use mathematical concepts to solve problems.

Make sure to check out this video where Mike shows you how to solve a Probability question.

The main concepts you should focus on

The one thing that you need to keep in mind when starting your GMAT prep is the level of math you need to know before going in for the Quant section. All you’ll need to master is high-school level math. That being said, once you have revised and mastered these math fundamentals, your final step is learning how to apply this knowledge to actual GMAT problems and you should be good to go. This is the more challenging side of things but doing this helps you tackle all the other problem areas you may be facing such as time management, confidence levels, and test anxiety

Here are the 4 main groups of questions on the quant section of the GMAT and the concepts that you should focus on for each:

Algebra

  • Algebraic expressions
  • Equations
  • Functions
  • Polynomials
  • Permutations and combinations
  • Inequalities
  • Exponents

Geometry

  • Lines
  • Angles
  • Triangles
  • Circles
  • Polygons
  • Surface area
  • Volume
  • Coordinate geometry

Word problems

  • Profit
  • Sets
  • Rate
  • Interest
  • Percentage
  • Ratio
  • Mixtures

Check out this Profit and Loss question.

Arithmetic

  • Number theory
  • Percentages
  • Basic statistics
  • Power and root
  • Integer properties
  • Decimals
  • Fractions
  • Probability
  • Real numbers

Make sure to try your hand at this GMAT probability problem.

5 tips to improve your GMAT quant skills?

  1. Master the fundamentals! This is your first step towards acing this section of the GMAT. As this section only contains math that you have already studied thoroughly in high-school, you’ll only need to revise what you have already learned and you’ll be ready to start practicing some real GMAT problems. 
  2. Practice time management! This is a crucial step as every single question is timed and you won’t get more than 2 minutes to spend on each question. That is why you should start timing yourself early on in your GMAT prep, so you get used to the time pressure. 
  3. Know the question types! This is something that you will learn once you get enough practice with some actual GMAT questions. That way, you’ll be able to easily recognize different question types and you’ll be able to use your preferred solution path without losing time.
  4. Memorize the answer choices for the data sufficiency questions! These answers are always the same and their order never changes. Memorizing them will help you save precious time that you can spend elsewhere. To help you better memorize them, we are sharing an easier and less wordy way to think of them:
  5. Make use of your scrap paper! There is a reason why you’re provided with scrap paper, so make sure to take advantage of it. You will definitely need it to take notes and make calculations, especially for the problem-solving questions that you will come across in this GMAT question.
  • Only statement 1
  • Only statement 2
  • Both statements together
  • Either statement
  • Neither statement
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Posted on
21
Jul 2021

GMAT 3D Geometry Problem – GMAT Math – Quant Section

GMAT 3D Geometry Problem 

In this problem we’re going to take a look at 3D objects and in particular a special problem type on the GMAT that measures the longest distance within a three-dimensional object. Typically, they give you rectangular solids, but they can also give you cylinders and other such objects. The key thing to remember about problems like this one is that effectively we’re stacking Pythagorean theorems to solve it – we’re finding triangles and then triangles within triangles that define the longest distance.

This type of problem is testing your spatial skills and a graphic or visual aid is often helpful though strictly not necessary. Let’s take a look at how to solve this problem and because it’s testing these skills the approach is generally mathematical that is there is some processing because it’s secondary to what they’re actually testing.

gmat 3d geometry question

GMAT 3D Geometry Problem Introduction

So, we have this rectangular solid and it doesn’t matter which way we turn it – the longest distance is going to be between any two opposite corners and you can take that to the bank as a rule: On a rectangular solid the opposite corners will always be the longest distance. Here we don’t have any way to process this central distance so, what we need to do is make a triangle out of it.

Notice that the distance that we’re looking for along with the height of 5 and the hypotenuse of the 10 by 10 base will give us a right triangle. We can apply Pythagoras here if we have the hypotenuse of the base. We’re working backwards from what we need to what we can make rather than building up. Once you’re comfortable with this you can do it in either direction.

Solving the Problem

In this case we’ve got a 10 by 10 base. It’s a 45-45-90 because any square cut in half is a 45-45-90 which means we can immediately engage the identity of times root two. So, 10, 10, 10 root 2. 10 root 2 and 5 makes the two sides. We apply Pythagoras again. Here it’s a little more complicated mathematically and because you’re going in and out of taking square roots and adding and multiplying, you want to be very careful not to make a processing error here.

Careless errors abound particularly when we’re distracted from the math and yet we need to do some processing. So, this is a point where you just want to say “Okay, I’ve got all the pieces, let me make sure I do this right.” 10 root 2 squared is 200 (10 times 10 is 100, root 2 times root 2 is 2, 2 times 100 is 200). 5 squared is 25. Add them together 225. And then take the square root and that’s going to give us our answer. The square root of 225 is one of those numbers we should know. It’s 15, answer choice A.

Okay guys for another 3D and Geometry problem check out GMAT 680 Level Geometry Problem – No Math Needed! We will see you next time.

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Posted on
14
Jul 2021

GMAT 680 Level Geometry Problem – No Math Needed!

GMAT Geometry Problem

Hey guys, top level geometry problems are characterized typically by stringing a whole bunch of different rules together and understanding how one thing relates to the next thing, to the next thing. Until you get from the piece of information you started with to the conclusion. We’re going to start out by taking a look at this problem using the z equals 50° and seeing how that information goes down the line.

top level geometry problem

But afterwards we’re going to see a super simple logical pathway utilizing a graphic scenario that makes the z equals 50° irrelevant. To begin with we’re being asked for the sum of x and y and this will come into play on the logical side. We need the sum not the individual amounts but let’s begin with the y. We have a quadrilateral and it has parallel sides which means the two angles z and y must equal 180°. That’s one of our geometric rules. If z is 50° that means y is 130° and we’re halfway there.

Next we need to figure out how x relates and there are several pathways to this. One way we can do it is drop. By visualizing or dropping a third parallel line down, intersecting x, so on the one hand we’ll have 90 degrees. We’ll have that right angle and on the other we’ll have that piece. Notice that the parallel line we dropped and the parallel line next to z are both being intersected by the diagonal line going through which means that that part of x equals z. So we have 50° plus 90° is 140°. 130° from the y, 140° from the x, gives us 270°.

Another way we can do this is by taking a look at the right triangle that’s already built in z is 50° so y is 1 30°. now the top angle in the triangle must then be 180° minus the 130° that is 50°. it must match the z again we have the parallel lines with the diagonal coming through then the other angle the one opposite x is the 180° degrees that are in the triangle minus the 90° from the right triangle brings us to 90° minus the 50° from the angle we just figured out means that it’s 40° which means angle x is 180° flat line supplementary angles minus the 40° gives us 140° plus the 130° we have from y again we get to 270°.

Graphic Solution Path

Now here’s where it gets really fun and really interesting. We can run a graphic scenario here by noticing that as long as we keep all the lines oriented in the same way we can actually shift the angle x up. We can take the line that extends from this big triangle and just shift it right up the line until it matches with the y. What’s going to happen there, is we’re going to see that we have 270° degrees in that combination of x and y and that it leaves a right triangle of 90°, that we can take away from 360° again to reach the 270°.

Here the 50° is irrelevant and watch these two graphic scenarios to understand why no matter how steep or how flat this picture becomes we can always move that x right up and get to the 270°. That is the x and y change in conjunction with one another as z changes. You can’t change one without the other while maintaining all these parallel lines and right angles. Seeing this is challenging to say the least, it requires a very deep understanding of the rules and this is one of those circumstances that really points to weaknesses in understanding most of what we learn in math class in middle school, in high school. Even when we’re prepping only scratches the surface of some of the more subtle things that we’re either allowed to do or the subtle characteristics of rules and how they work with one another and so a true understanding yields this very rapid graphic solution path.

Logical Solution Path

The logical solution path where immediately we say x and y has to be 270° no matter what z is and as you progress into the 80th, 90th percentile into the 700 level on the quant side this is what you want to look for during your self prep. You want to notice when there’s a clever solution path that you’ll overlook because of the rules. Understand why it works and then backtrack to understand how that new mechanism that you discovered fits into the framework of the rules that we all know and love. Maybe? I don’t know if we love them! But they’re there, we know them, we’re familiar with them, we want to become intimate. So get intimate with your geometry guys put on some al green light some candles and I’ll see you next time.

If you enjoyed this problem, try other geometry problems here: GMAT Geometry.

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The Advantages of Being a Non-native Speaker on the GMAT
Posted on
13
Jul 2021

The Advantages of Being a Non-native Speaker on the GMAT

By: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Svetozara Saykova
Date: 13th July 2020

GMAT Non Native Speaker Advantages:

The GMAT is a challenging exam to all, but it can be particularly difficult for non-native speakers. Since it is administered in English only, which is an additional obstacle one needs to consider when preparing for the GMAT exam. If you aren’t secure in your English language skills don’t hurry to get frustrated. Being aware that this is your weak spot is the first step towards improving and we advise you to not stop here. Be sure to research small habits that can immensely improve your English language skills. Watching tv series and movies in English with subtitles, reading English or American literature or listening to a podcast are all leisurely activities that can help you polish your English. If your English is already excellent, that is a win. This article will provide you with tips and insights on how to utilize your bilingual (or multilingual) background to excel in your GMAT preparation. 

Grammar is Your Best Friend 

The GMAT is specifically designed to test native English speakers. A majority of native speakers have not spent years memorizing grammar rules and enriching their vocabularies by writing down or repeating words and phrases. They have learned English through hearing people around them speak, just like you have learned your native language. Due to this lack of thorough grammatical knowledge, native speakers can get confused by the pitfalls intentionally placed throughout the GMAT exam, especially in the Verbal section. For them the hidden traps remain unnoticed but for non native speakers they can often be easily spotted since non-native speakers know the grammar rules. By contrast, most non-native speakers have learned English through repetition and mastering grammar rules. Such familiarity with English grammar prior to any GMAT preparation is an invaluable asset. It might cut short your prep time and allow you to concentrate and work on areas that are more difficult for you. 

You Know What Dedication Means

Learning a language is a demanding and long undertaking. Countless hours of studying words and collocations, memorizing grammar rules, reading, listening, writing, and doing practice exams are all more or less part of the journey to mastering any language. Your English proficiency did not appear overnight, but once you know your learning style, the journey accelerates. Learning a new skill is a process, which requires personalization and an approach that suits your character and studying style. Similarly, the GMAT requires one to develop techniques, approaches to problems, and most importantly a proper mindset over a period of time in order to achieve a great score. You might already be aware of what works for you and what definitely doesn’t in terms of learning and this will provide you with a vantage position for successfully kick starting your GMAT prep. 

You Have a Bilingual Brain 

Back in the days bilingualism was considered to be a drawback, which slowed down one’s cognitive development. Those beliefs were disproved long ago and to the contrary, it has been confirmed that being bilingual/multilingual is beneficial to one’s brain and to their cognitive abilities. For instance, the effort and attention needed to switch between languages triggers more activity in the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex. This part of the brain plays a main role in executive function, problem solving and focusing while filtering out irrelevant information. Those are some of the essential skills that the GMAT is testing: 

are some of the GMAT challenges that you should have an easier time tackling as a bilingual individual. 

These are some of the advantages a non-native English speaker could have when it comes to the GMAT. Being aware of your strengths and weaknesses is a vital component to achieving a remarkable score on the GMAT. Here at Apex GMAT we have a team of dedicated and knowledgeable professionals eager to provide excellent guidance to non native speakers. We take great pride in our personalized approach and this can be the exact strategy that will help you turn your background and previous experience into an invaluable advantage.

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7 Daily Practices For GMAT Success - GMAT Guide
Posted on
08
Jul 2021

7 Daily Practices For GMAT Success

By: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Ruzanna Mirzoyan
Date: 8th July 2021

7 Things You Need To Do Daily When Preparing For The GMAT (GMAT Guide)

  1. Visualize success and the value you will get in the end
  2. Review a the GMAT sections
  3. Set a time limit for each day
  4. Do not forget to reward yourself
  5. Forget about the target score only focus on improvement
  6. Give yourself a pep talk 
  7. Evaluate Yourself Honestly

     Achieving a great score on the GMAT exam is not an easy task. The overall preparation process is daunting for a majority of test takers, especially for non-native English speakers. It requires diligent work and a daily checklist that you need to follow. So how do you come up with a plan that works? This article covers seven tips for successful GMAT prep which will guide you throughout the entire process. Even though every individual taking the exam has different expectations, experiences and may be approaching the test in a different way, sticking to a daily routine is an integral part of test success; the most difficult thing is adhering to it, avoiding procrastination and maintaining motivation. Therefore, after learning all the exam basics, such as the timing, the sections, and the preparation materials, it is worth creating a checklist to help keep you on track.

Visualize success and the value you will get in the end

The thought of success can create happiness! Once we attain something that seemed difficult initially, the suspense wears off, and the excitement rapidly grows. By taking time every day to imagine achieving your goal you can stay motivated and on the right path. When we experience happiness our brain releases serotonin, the hormone responsible for happiness. By keeping the picture of accomplishment in our mind, this happiness never fades. Hence, if every day contains even a tiny bit of happiness, even the most complex struggles seem simpler to overcome. Whether the GMAT exam is a struggle or not, happiness and motivation are something that one undoubtedly always lacks. Do your best to look at the bigger picture and think of the steps that will expedite reaching the top.

Review the GMAT exam sections

Whether you have a private GMAT tutor or are studying on your own, be sure to review difficult parts of the overall format of the exam every day before going through your study materials, for example the data sufficiency answer choices. You may do a short quiz on quantitative, verbal, or integrated reasoning to keep pace with timing and question types. You can consider this form of revision as stretching your brain muscles before the main exercise. Doing a simple GMAT quiz each time will make you more cautious about time management and remind you about the type of questions that you may have already mastered in previous study sessions.

Set a study time limit for each day

As it is said, time is the only non-redeemable commodity, so proper allocation is a fundamental key to success. We recommend you have a specific time allocation for GMAT prep each day. That can be some time for weekday preparation and extension on the weekends. Ensure the limit you set for yourself is reasonable because procrastinating one day and doubling the hours the next day does not work out. It does not matter how many months you have on your hands; the significant thing is precise allocation. If you want to get a decent score, you must spend approximately 100-120 hours reviewing the materials and practicing. However, top scorers usually  spend 120+ hours studying. Whether you belong to the former or the latter category, remember that time is the most expensive investment you are making. At the same time keep in mind that your study-life balance should be of utmost importance. 

Do not forget to reward yourself

It is not a secret that the GMAT is burdensome and overwhelming, and preparing for it can be stressful and oftentimes disheartening. Not having small rewards to look forward to can lead to demotivation. Rewards are things that rejuvenate your broken concentration. Try something like the Pomodoro Technique. This technique helps break down time into intervals with short breaks. Instead of breaks, you can think of something ‘non-GMAT related’ that will make you regain focus. For example, by grabbing a quick snack, meditating, or walking around the house or even watching a short YouTube video. Whichever works best for you, make use of it; even brief respites retain your stamina. Finally, never forget about the bigger reward; your final score. 

Forget about the target score, only focus on improvement

GMAT preparation practices do generate plight both in physical and mental states. It is crucial to remind oneself of the improvement phases. We agree that everything you are going through is for the final score. But focusing on the final score too much can frustrate you if you are not making big leaps towards it, which in turn can be counter productive. All successful practices dictate that you should focus on one thing at a time, which improves every day until the exam day. When the exam day comes, you will utilize all the knowledge and effort to get the highest GMAT score possible. Keeping daily track of your improvements relieves some of the burden on your shoulders. Even the tiniest advantage acquired can be a game changer. For instance, finishing each section a minute earlier than before will eventually contribute to achieving more significant results on the exam day, or perfecting a solution path which has you approaching a host of GMAT problems in a more efficient manner. These small wins can be the fuel to keep you going. 

Give yourself a pep talk 

I am sure you receive a lot of support from the people surrounding you. However, self-encouragement is of the utmost importance. Look around, see what others are doing at your age and inspire yourself. Choose wisely between the tradeoffs. Such as choosing to study instead of partying. Giving yourself a daily pep talk will make you more enthusiastic about reaching your objectives. A recent scientific study has shown that talking to yourself dwindles anxiety and stress while boosting performance. This is no less true for GMAT test preparation. Give yourself motivational and instructional pep talks. This method promotes positivity as motivational talks cheer you up and keep up the eagerness to study and strive for more, while a self-instructional talk directs detail-orientation and accentuates what exactly you need to do for that particular day. For example, start every day by loudly stating what should be done for the day. It helps with thinking about the mechanisms of every individual task and visualizing methods to complete them correspondingly. 

Evaluate Yourself Honestly

Of course, you need all the encouragement and self-support to reach your goals, but especially during GMAT exam preparation, you need to be hard on yourself if required. If you need a 650+ GMAT score, you should be aware that it will not be a piece of cake. Give yourself credit for what you are doing right, but also consider aspects of the GMAT problems that you need to elaborate on and master additional skills. The dominant thing is separating the action from the person because you are evaluating your actions and not you as a person; you should not upset yourself but rather detect the triggers of low performance and challenges and make yourself accountable for such actions with a plan to move forward from them successfully. Ultimately, the ability to discern your flaws and work on personal evolution is an inherent quality for capacitating your abilities and aptitudes and pulling it off in life. 

We hope that adding these practical and mindful aspects to your daily preparation will be helpful as when you are preparing for an exam like the GMAT, being in the right mind frame can be as important as doing the quant or verbal practice. Whether you have a GMAT private tutor or not, it is on you to maintain motivation during the entire process. We suggest you develop a GMAT test strategy along with these seven tips to attain greater productivity and manifest superb performance. Make studying for the GMAT a daily habit and success will follow. 

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