At-Home GMAT Prep: A Handy Guide
Posted on
02
Sep 2021

At-Home GMAT Prep: A Handy Guide

Ready to take the next step in your academic career and select an MBA program that will open new doors for you? Well first, you need to take one of the most important exams of your life – the GMAT. This is not something you can take easily as it can potentially score you some scholarships that will help fund your education and it’s one of those things that employers will want to take a look at. That’s why people spend months preparing for the GMAT. That being said, Apex tutors suggest a prep time period of 90 to 120 days.

So, to make the process easier for you, we came up with a guide full of the best tips and tricks that will help you prepare for the GMAT at home, along with some common mistakes to avoid when prepping.

The 2 Main Benefits of At-Home GMAT Prep

It essentially comes down to you to work hard and follow some best practices. Here’s how at-home self-prep will help you succeed:

  • You’ll be able to study in a familiar place. That will make you more comfortable and having a designated GMAT prep space will keep you more focused on your progress.
  • This is a good opportunity for you to study at your own pace and at a schedule that best suits you and your needs. This is definitely a much more convenient alternative than any GMAT prep class that you can take to help you prep.

Top 5 Tips To Follow for a Successful At-Home GMAT Prep

Here are the top 5 best practices to follow when preparing for the GMAT at home:

Find a Good Location

What you want to do is have a designated space where you sit down every day and work on the GMAT. You’d want to pick a place where there are no distractions and where you’ll be able to get work done without being bothered. One thing to keep in mind is that you don’t want to get too comfortable as you actually want to get some work done and not just end up laying down and napping every time you decide to study for the GMAT.

Give Yourself Enough Time

Make sure to start early with your GMAT preparation as the more time you have to work on improving, the higher your chances of succeeding and getting a higher score. That’s why you’d want to give yourself a minimum of 3 months to prepare depending on your prior knowledge and the level of preparation that you’ll need to succeed.

Follow a Structured Schedule

As soon as you decide to start preparing for the GMAT, you’re going to have to come up with a personalized schedule that you have to follow until the exam day. Following a schedule where you have to practice a bit every day instead of cramming everything on the last week, will keep you more focused. It will also not overwork you and you’ll have just enough time to go through every section in detail and also some extra time to take some mock tests to practice your knowledge.

Practice, Practice, Practice!

You know what they say: practice makes perfect. Well, they’re not wrong! The more practice you get before taking the actual exam, the better, especially because mock tests help you point out the areas that you need to work harder on. Mock exams also help you get used to the exam’s format and scoring system so you won’t have trouble navigating the exam in the future.

To make things easier, here are a few alternatives where you can get practice tests and official materials to practice on:

Learn to Manage Your Time!

The test-takers’ #1 pitfall is not focusing on the time when preparing for the GMAT, being well-aware that GMAT is a timed exam. We suggest practicing without a time constraint at first, just so you can get used to the format and the concepts. After you get a better understanding of what to expect, you can start timing yourself. You’d want to practice with a timer in order to actually see how well you’d perform in the real GMAT exam. Time pressure is a real thing, and what you don’t want to do is show up and not be able to finish your test on time.

Top 3 Mistakes To Avoid When Preparing for the GMAT

Now that we went over some of the best tips, let’s talk about some common mistakes that students make that you definitely need to avoid:

Procrastinating

Deciding that you need to start prepping for the GMAT in advance is one thing, but what most people end up doing is doing a little bit in the beginning and then procrastinating until it’s too late to go back. You don’t want to cram everything in the last 2 weeks: that’s not time-efficient and it won’t help you master the exam. Instead, you’ll just get more stressed and overwhelmed. In other words, try to keep the same pace throughout the whole 3-4 month period of your at-home GMAT prep in order to get the score you’re aiming for.

Stressing Way Too Much On Exam Day

It’s normal to worry about your scores as this exam can very well determine your future. However, worrying way too much can affect your performance on exam day. Instead, take your time to prepare and do your best when the time comes for you to take the GMAT, and you’ll be just fine. One extra step that you can take to help you manage the stress is visiting the test center before the exam. That way, you’ll get used to the journey and the place and you’ll also feel more relaxed if you know what to expect.  

Studying Instead Of Practicing

Another mistake students make is studying study guides instead of practicing extensively. Study guides can help you so much, but practicing on real exams is what will essentially put all that textbook knowledge into practice. So make sure to spend most of your time on actual practice, rather than focusing on learning concepts by heart.

Pro tip: Another way to help you accelerate learning is by working with a one-on-one GMAT instructor. The help of an expert can be beneficial, especially when you find that you are not making any progress with your prep or if you find yourself falling victim to any of the at-home prep mistakes listed above. These instructors know their way around the exam and will bring some structure to your at-home GMAT prep as they work around your schedule and will keep you focused on what’s important.

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GMAT Prep Best Practices
Posted on
26
Aug 2021

How Top Scorers Study for The GMAT

By: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Narek Petrosyan
Date: 26 August 2021

GMAT Prep Best Practices 

Whether you are still preparing to take your first GMAT exam or aiming to get a higher score than on your previous one, you need a certain routine or a study plan and a determination to invest your full capacity into diligent and dedicated hard work. The top MBA programs usually require a GMAT score of 650 or above. Spending your time and energy inefficiently or not investing in proper preparation, may significantly, if not completely, reduce the chances of pursuing your MBA aspirations. In this article, we will explore some of the effective methods you can integrate into your prep to get a GMAT 650 score or above.

The Fundamentals

Firstly, let’s settle the most fundamental requirements that you need to make sure are inherently engraved into your approach. Those are unshakable dedication, efficient time management, wise prioritization, hard work, and diligence. While some of these can be considered common sense, in the long run, many students usually get distracted and forget about those. More commonly, the accumulated stress from the GMAT prep can shatter the pillars that these students have once so proudly built to hold the weight. 

Figure Out Your Learning Style and Find a Fitting Resource

After you’ve set your MBA goals and feel determined to start preparing for the GMAT, it’s now time to figure out your learning style and find a resource that fits. Nowadays, there are far more resources available than ever before. As such, it can be quite overwhelming to make a detailed choice. One of the first questions you need to ask yourself is what is your current or potential score? If you haven’t taken a GMAT test yet, maybe you should first find resources that start with the basics. Alternatively, if you’re aiming to get your current score to the top, you may also consider taking a one on one GMAT tutoring course. There are a myriad of companies that offer private GMAT tutoring services both online and in-person. ApexGMAT, for example, is more focused on increasing your current score to a 700+. Once you’ve set your current level you can then start working on that and find the best method for your preparation, given the abundance of resources available.

Manage Your Time Efficiently

Another, not less of an important aspect you should consider is time management. How much time can you dedicate to your prep daily? Many Top MBA schools prefer a 700+ GMAT score, which, in turn, requires a minimum of 100 hours of productive study in total. The word productive is essential here, as it is sometimes rather easy to mistake your activity for achievement. It’s not the matter of how many hours you can sit in front of your desk with an open book, but how much of it you can absorb, understand, and actually prepare for during that time. Too little time devoted will never be enough, while too much study can cause severe stress, and in fact, the next day you may not remember half of what you’ve learned. So, be realistic and honest with yourself, find that sweet daily time slot when you can prepare for the GMAT having enough energy and no external distractions, be consistent, strategic, and habitual, and, overall, manage your time efficiently during the day, prioritizing your studies.

Focus on Weak Areas and Improving Your Strengths

Start with a diagnostic test to figure out areas that need improvement first. It would be especially helpful if you’re just starting, as it may let you understand your weaknesses and strengths, and therefore what route you should take further. It will also give you a picture of how the actual exam will look like quite early in your preparation creed. After you’ve identified your weak points, it’s time to address those. If you seem weak, for example, in the quantitative section, then it’s a good indicator that you should put much more focus on that. That being said, you should not neglect the sections and types of problems that you do well on. One of the reasons the GMAT is challenging is its time pressure. The more you can nourish your strengths, the better you’ll be able to deal with the time pressure. Not only that, the GMAT test is adaptive, so the further you go with the streak, the harder the questions will get.

Get Plenty of Sleep and Try to Reduce Stress

Lack of sufficient and healthy sleep is probably the number one obstacle standing in most students’ way of effective GMAT preparations and, consequently, top GMAT performance. Your sleep hygiene plays a key role in allowing the brain to absorb what’s been learned during the day, as well as preparing it for the prep of the arriving day. As such, one of the best practices the top scorers integrate into their preparation is a good 8 hours of sleep every night. In turn, not only will this benefit your GMAT prep, but also your overall and mental health. Even if it will take you away from GMAT exam studies, it’s still worth it. You can learn more about how sleep helps you improve your GMAT prep time in this youtube video.

Start and Plan Early

As for the final tips, there are a few things you can do to eliminate a huge portion of stress from your test preparation studies and, in fact, significantly contribute to your preparations. Firstly, make sure you start as early as possible. Just as soon as you decide on your MBA goals, if possible, start figuring out your study plan immediately. Even if it may seem that there’s no need to rush just yet, in the long run, it will prove worthy and will increasingly boost your confidence before your exam day. Secondly, plan on the date early. Test centers may just have very limited spaces, and if you won’t be able to reserve your desired date, it may become a heavy burden. And lastly, make sure you don’t overwhelm yourself the day before your GMAT exam. Grant yourself a good resting day in a calm, positive, and stressless environment.

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Posted on
18
Aug 2021

GMAT Prime Factors Problem – GMAT Quant

Hey guys, check out this problem. This is an example of a problem that requires daisy-chaining together or linking together several key algebraic insights in order to answer it.

GMAT Prime Factors Problem - GMAT Quant

GMAT Prime Factors Problem – Applied Math Solution Path

Notice there’s an applied math solution path. We want prime factors of 3⁸ - 2⁸, and it’s just reasonable enough that we can do the math here. And the GMAT will do this a lot, they’ll give us math that’s time-consuming, but not unreasonably time-consuming in order to just draw us into an applied math solution path. We’ll take a look at this really quickly.

3⁸ is the same as 9⁴.
3⁸ = 3²*⁴= (3²)= 9
9 = (9 * 9)² = 81²
81 * 81 = 6,561

9 * 9 is 81² – about 6,400 or if we want to get exact, which we do need to do here because we’re dealing with factors, 81 * 81 is 6,561. Don’t expect you to know that, it can be done in 20 seconds on a piece of paper or mentally. And then 2⁸, that one you should know, is 256. And then, 6,561 – 256 = 6,305.

So now we need to break down 6,305 into prime factors. You know how to do that using a factor tree, so I’m going to zoom us right into a better solution path because I don’t want to give away the answer.

GMAT Prime Factors Problem – Another Solution Path

Notice that 3⁸  and 2⁸ are both perfect squares so we have the opportunity to factor this into (3– 2) * (3 + 2). Once again, the first term is a difference of two squares, the second term we can’t do anything with. So we break down that term, and lo and behold, (3² – 2²) * (3² + 2²) * (3 + 2), and once again we can factor that first term out into (3 + 2), (3 – 2), and so on. We work these out mathematically, and they’re much easier and more accessible mathematically, and we get 3 – 2 = 1 which obviously is a factor of everything. 3 + 2 = 5, 3² + 2² = 9 + 4 = 13, and then 3 + 2⁴ = 81 + 16 = 97.

So now we’ve eliminated everything, except B and C, 65 and 35. This is where the other piece of knowledge comes in. Since we have factors of 5 and 13. 65 must also be a factor because it’s comprised of a 5 and a 13. 35 requires a 7. We don’t have a 7 anywhere, so the correct answer choice is C, 35. 

GMAT Prime Factors Problem – Takeaways

So the big takeaways here are, that, when provided with some sort of algebraic expression like this, look for a factoring pattern. And, when it comes to prime factorization, remember, that if you break it down into the basic prime factor building blocks, anything that is a product of those building blocks also exists as a factor.

Hope this helped and good luck!

Found it helpful? Try your hand at this GMAT problem, GMAT Prime Factorization (Anatomy of a Problem).

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GMAT Arithmetic
Posted on
17
Aug 2021

GMAT Arithmetic 101- All You Need To Know

By: Apex GMAT
Date: 17 August 2021

While studying and preparing for the GMAT quant section, you might have come across some different types of GMAT arithmetic questions. These are actually quite common in the quantitative reasoning section and can be often intertwined with other GMAT algebra and GMAT geometry questions.

These usually come in 2 different formats: data sufficiency problems and problem-solving. The former have a very particular structure where you will have to determine whether the 2 statements are enough to come up with a solution. The latter type of problem requires you to actually solve the problem and derive a proper solution.

In this article, we’ll tell you more about how to go about solving these GMAT arithmetic questions, so keep on reading to find out more.

Arithmetic Concepts you need to revise

These are the arithmetic concepts you’ll need to know before you start practicing. Make sure to revise these fundamentals:

How to solve a GMAT arithmetic problem?

The number 1 thing you need to keep in mind when dealing with GMAT arithmetic problems is that the concepts that you’ll come across are fairly simple. You can easily revise these concepts because they are all things we study in high-school-level math. But here’s the kicker: the way these concepts are incorporated into the GMAT problems makes them more challenging, especially when the GMAT arithmetic problems are intertwined with GMAT algebra problems or even GMAT geometry problems. That is where things get tricky, as you need to apply your knowledge in a much more complicated setting that incorporates more than one concept. However, it all comes down to knowing the basics of arithmetics, which we can also refer to as the mechanics of the problem. 

In order to help you better understand how to go about a GMAT arithmetic question, we will discuss an arithmetic problem and its solution and solution paths. In this GMAT problem, we are going to see how even the simplest mathematical concepts can become more challenging given the way the problem is formulated and structured.

Problem (GMAT Official Guide 2018) 

When positive integer x is divided by positive integer y, the remainder is 9.
If x/y = 96.12, what is the value of y?

(A) 96
(B) 75
(C) 48
(D) 25
(E) 12

Solution:
In this case, you will have to revise the properties of numbers in order to properly find a solution to the problem.
When x is divided by y, the remainder is 9. So x=yq + 9 for a random positive integer q.
After dividing both sides by y, we get: x/y = q + 9/y.
But, x/y= 96.12 = 96 + 0.12.
Equating the two expressions for x/y gives q + 9/y= 96+0.12.
Thus: 

q=96 and 9/y= 0.12
9=0.12y
y=9/0.12
y=75 

The correct answer is B.

Now that we went over the solution path for an arithmetic problem on the GMAT exam, you are ready to start your prep. Keep in mind that you should not overthink the questions. Some of them might really look challenging and complex. However, the solution paths can be fairly easy and it ultimately comes down to knowing the “mechanics” of the question.

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Posted on
11
Aug 2021

GMAT Markup Problem – GMAT Data Sufficiency

Hey guys, today we’re going to take a look at a typically characteristic data sufficiency problem that gives us a relationship, and then asks us if we have enough to compute the final value of that relationship. There’s an algebraic solution path here, where they give us the equation and we need to see if we have all but one of the variables, that final variable being the one that they’re asking for. We can also do this via parts, scenario, and graphically, and we’ll take a look at all those as well.

GMAT Markup Problem Introduction

GMAT Markup Problem

This problem describes to us the relationship between the selling price, the cost, and the markup. And notice that, while we’re going to sketch it out here, the actual relationship doesn’t matter to us – all that matters is that if they’re asking for one term in terms of the rest if we have the other terms, that’ll be enough.

Algebraically we have selling price S equals the cost C plus the markup M. So this is giving us the markup in, let’s say dollar terms, whereas we might also set this up as selling price equals cost times one plus the markup percentage. And here we just have that notational shift. So, what we’re looking for, if we want to know the markup relative to the selling price, is an understanding of it either relative to the selling price or relative to the cost. That is, these two things are associated and the markup, when associated with the cost, gives us a ratio. Where the markup, when associated with the selling price, is a fraction. And if you’ll remember notationally these things are expressed differently, but conceptually there’s the same math behind it.

Statement 1

Number one gives us in percentage terms the mark up compared to the cost. So, here we can see it as 25% more and this is where it ties into that second version of the algebraic one we just looked at. The cost we can break up into four parts of 25% so that when we add the markup that’s a fifth part. Therefore, the markup comprises one-fifth or 20% of the selling price.

Statement 2

Number two provides us a concrete selling price but doesn’t tell us anything about the markup or the mix of cost versus markup as a percentage of the total selling price. Two is insufficient on its own, and as we’ve seen in many other data sufficiency problems, what they’re trying to do here is fool us into thinking we need a specific price, a discrete value to get sufficiency. When the question stem is asking us only for a relative value and when we’re being asked for a relative value, a percentage, a fraction, a ratio be on the lookout for fooling yourself into thinking that you need an anchor point a specific discrete value.

I hope this helps. If you enjoyed this GMAT Markup Problem, try your hand at this Triangle DS Problem.

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GMAT score use in employment
Posted on
05
Aug 2021

Why is your GMAT Score Important for Prospective Jobs?

By: Apex GMAT
Date: 5th August 2021

Taking the GMAT and getting a 700+ score is not only going to help you pursue your MBA career, it will also facilitate additional professional benefits. Indeed, the GMAT requires far more skills than just the math or verbal skills that are tested, and success can be evidence of an array of capabilities. Read on to find out what GMAT score use in employment is and why more employers are taking candidates’ GMAT scores into account in hiring decisions.

Of course, a high GMAT score primarily makes one stand out from other job applicants. Moreover, it is also a clear and objective indicator of your integrated reasoning abilities, as well as your analytical, verbal, and quantitative reasoning skills. Particularly for those interested in applying for finance, investment, or business-related employment, an excellent GMAT score can be proof of expertise in the aforementioned categories. 

At the surface level, a high score in the quant section demonstrates that a candidate can solve and interpret numerical problems. More significantly, it also implies that the applicant can be trusted with complex calculations, extensive financial reports, and other major related tasks. Furthermore, a candidate’s integrated reasoning skills will be seen to be of great professional value, especially when working with a large amount of data from multiple sources. Extrapolating the right takeaways and decision-making points from this wide array of data is a skill highly sought after by employers.  

The GMAT’s testing of analytical writing and verbal reasoning skills have implications for a candidate’s professional capabilities. Scores in these sections speak to the applicant’s capacity for critical thinking as well as how clearly and precisely they can express their ideas in written form.

Ultimately, the GMAT score helps employers select their hires based on information gleaned from standardized testing, and not just personal characteristics or experience. This allows for a selection process that is much more comprehensive. 

Since the GMAT is a requirement for MBA admission, a high score also indicates that the candidate has been admitted to a prestigious and academically rigorous university. Potential employers perceive such individuals as having a high-quality education from top-notch professors. Many of whom have worked in their industry. 

Finally, a candidate with a high GMAT score is also better placed to perform well during a job interview than someone who has never prepared for such a test. By putting his/her critical thinking and verbal reasoning skills into practice, a job candidate with a 700+ score is more likely to excel at answering questions that require the application of analytical and logical skills. Moreover, having taken the GMAT, prospective hires enjoy minimal interview anxiety or stress, because they were trained to manage such issues while preparing for the test. Additionally, they may be exempt from taking company interview tasks due to their performance on the GMAT. 

For all these reasons, employers will always value individuals with high GMAT scores, giving them preference over the job seekers with low or no GMAT scores. For more information regarding the GMAT Scoring, GMAT Scoring Demystified is a very insightful article to read.  

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Posted on
04
Aug 2021

GMAT Abstract Data Sufficiency Problem

Abstract Data Sufficiency Problems & Scenarios

Hi guys! Abstract data sufficiency problems tend to really lend themselves to running scenarios – It doesn’t matter if it’s an abstract inequality or a number theory problem, really anytime you’ve got variables thrown into the question stimulus on a DS problem, scenarios is a good way to go. Now your scenarios can be discrete actual numbers that you throw in there, but you can also leverage rules and have more conceptual-level scenarios. We’re going to take a look at both in this problem.

Problem Introduction

We’re being asked here for the evenness or oddness of n which is an integer. At first blush, we’re going to say, “Well, if we have the evenness or oddness of any expression involving n and n alone, we should be able to backtrack it to n.” If you don’t see that then you might fall into the trap of having to go much more deeply into it and figure out “Well, what if n is this, what if n is that?” But notice here that because we’re dealing with evens and odds there are a set of identities that govern every possible addition, or multiplication, subtraction, or division of evens and odds. So, as long as there’s nothing complicating it the expression itself will be enough.

Statement 1

Taking a look at the introduced information, number one gives us n2 + 1 is odd that means that n2 is even. How do we know without numbers? If n2 + 1 is odd then adjusting it down by one, removing that one, means we’re definitely going to get to an even, because the number line is just even, odd, even, odd, even, odd all the way up. So, we have n2 is even, and only even times even gives us an even. Odd times odd doesn’t, odd times odd gives us an odd.

So, n must be even if the square of it leads us to an even. Notice again, that we don’t need to do any of that, it’s enough just to say we’ve got n in an expression, and we have its evenness and oddness.

Statement 2

Number two works the same way. 3n + 4 is even that’s enough, no more to do, but if we want to we can adjust that 3n – 4 as even down by 4 notches (odd, even, odd, even). So 3n is even and then we know that n divided by 3, that is what is an even divided by 3, will give us n. An even divided by an odd is going to always be an even, for the same reason even times an odd is always going to be an even.

Run some scenarios here, start out with an even number; let’s do 6, 50, and 120. Divide each by 3; 2 (6/3=2), 50 divided by 3 doesn’t work, 40 (120/3=40). So on the two that do work, we get to even numbers. 50 is not allowed to be used as a scenario because we’re told that n – 3 has to be an integer which means, that 3n must also be an integer; that is 3n is a multiple of 3. Since 50 is not a multiple of 3 it’s not a potential 3n. Take a minute with that one, because it’s kind of looking at everything in reverse.

So here we have two different expressions that both give us evenness and oddness, they both work independently. The answer choice is D – each alone is sufficient.

If you enjoyed this problem, try your hand at these Data Sufficiency Problems GMAT Trade Show Problem & Area of a Triangle Problem.

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How To Keep Your Sanity While Preparing For The GMAT
Posted on
03
Aug 2021

How To Keep Your Sanity While Preparing For The GMAT

By: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Nemrout Safarian
Date: 3rd August, 2021

The Hows:
– Taking a GMAT Preparation Course
– Creating an Effective Study Schedule
– Controlling Your Emotions
– Maintaining Connection to Your Support Team
– Resting and Getting Good Sleep
– Celebrating Your Big and Little Achievements

 

Experiencing too much anxiety over the GMAT Exam might cause a negative impact on your mental health and make it difficult for you to keep your sanity. Moreover, it might even make it more challenging to concentrate when studying and disrupt your sleep schedule. However, with the correct test stress and anxiety busting tactics, as well as an effective studying schedule, your GMAT exam preparation can become much less stressful.

Here are 6 tips that we recommend to make your GMAT exam preparation stress-free and effective.

  • Take a GMAT Preparation Course

Everyone’s GMAT story is different. Some people can get a 700 score based on everything they already know, without opening a GMAT book. But, for most students, a preparation course or one on one prep time with a personal GMAT  tutor is necessary for two reasons. First: it puts you in the right direction in terms of exam content, strategies, solution paths, and tactics to tackle problems, by helping you structure a concrete and designated studying plan.

Secondly: it makes you feel much more confident and emotionally calm, as you work with a trustworthy and an experienced professional who knows the ins and outs of the exam and preparation insights. Furthermore, a GMAT tutor can assist you with anything necessary throughout the preparation and testing process. Apex GMAT, for example, offers a complimentary consultation call for interested individuals, looking for structured personalized GMAT preparation. 

 

  • Create an Effective Study Schedule

Don’t wait for the perfect time to take the GMAT. This moment may never reveal itself! Life will always throw you curveballs and can end up curtailing your plans. Situations may arise which may interfere with your GMAT preparation as well. During your GMAT prep, you should take the extra effort to harmonize any unexpected situations with your study schedule.

One effective method you could try is to divide your studying schedule into multiple time frames throughout the day so that you can concentrate on preparing in smaller doses rather than studying for 5-7 hours straight and losing your ever so vital focus.

Study the materials during the weekdays and devote some time to practice tests where necessary. Practice test will help you to assess your progress and to understand your main strengths and weaknesses. Beware: don’t overuse practice tests. 

  • Control Your Emotions

At some point, the GMAT will stress you out, making you feel disappointed and frustrated. This is natural! Whether it is an unsatisfactory score on a practice test or the feeling of giving up, the GMAT can make it easy to have an emotional breakdown. However, it is important to be able to take control of your emotions, and have a “never a failure, always a lesson” attitude.

Every time you make a mistake, try to dive deep into that specific concept and figure out why you made that particular mistake. And learn from it. This is exactly how you make progress! Whenever you feel like you can’t go on anymore, remember your goals and aspirations, and that this test is a key to the completion of those. Also keep in mind that taking a break is a good thing, practicing in short timeframes will allow you to improve your skills without feeling overwhelmed.  With the proper frame of mind, you will find yourself studying again in no time.

  • Maintain a Connection to Your Support Team

The people you communicate with during your GMAT preparation process are very important and can hugely affect your frame of mind. Try not to isolate yourself too much from them. Spending your whole time in your room focusing on all that GMAT content can lead to burnouts.

Instead, spend time with the people whose presence is pleasing to you, who support and believe in you. This can be your family, your best friends, or the new acquaintance that has no idea what the GMAT even is. Constant communication with the people that you love will positively affect your overall mentality and help you stay engaged and happy when preparing for the test.

  • Get Some Rest and Good Sleep

Another essential thing to remember is paying attention to your sleep schedule. Add an extra half an hour to your sleep schedule so that you can give your brain time to wind down for the night. This extra half-hour is crucial, as we frequently overlook the time it takes to get ready for bed, set the alarm clock, and so on. Getting 8 hours of sleep a night while preparing for the GMAT is vital. 

Additionally, be cautious about what you are eating or drinking as an unhealthy diet can negatively affect your sleep schedule. Although the effects of caffeine may differ from person to person, try to avoid all sources of caffeine after 3 p.m. and modify accordingly. Aside from coffee, caffeine is found in a variety of foods and drinks, including tea, chocolate, and carbonated beverages. However, there are GMAT test prep benefits to caffeine products when consumed thoughtfully. 

  • Celebrate Your Big and Little Achievements

Your GMAT preparation process aims to help you reach your goals! Reward yourself a little – take a moment and celebrate little achievements. Whether it is progress in practice test scores or a complicated Math concept that you have finally mastered. It will help you feel more positive and confident about your overall knowledge and skills.

Be brave enough to challenge yourself with tougher concepts after. As you progress down your GMAT journey, be sure to celebrate  your short- and long-term accomplishments. These moments of celebration will undoubtedly assist you in keeping yourself at the top of your game and stress free.

Good luck studying and remember to believe in yourself! 

 

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Posted on
28
Jul 2021

GMAT Trade Show Problem – Data Sufficiency

GMAT Trade Show Problem Introduction

Today we’re going to take a look at the Trade Show Problem and this is a GMAT Data Sufficiency problem with averages as the focal point. But really the concept of average is distracting from this problem. So, if we take a look at the question stimulus, we want to figure out what we need, but we need to synthesize some of the information there to understand what we know.

We’re being asked whether or not it gets above a certain threshold an average of 90, and over six days that’s going to be over a total of 540 points. Notice how I did it mathematically, you can represent it graphically as a rectangle, but 90 times 6 is that 540 points. We know though that all of our days at a minimum are 80 which means we can build up from that piece of knowledge. We have 80 x 6 = 480 points and we want to know if we have more or less than 60 points above that minimum that we’re already working with that’s what we need.

Solving the GMAT Problem

Ways we might get it include any number of slices and dices for the performance of the rest of the days and the difficulty of this problem in large part will be dependent on how convoluted the GMAT gives us the introduced information on number one and two.

When we look at number one, we’re told that the final four days average out to a hundred. Once again, like with other average problems, each of the individual four days the performance doesn’t matter. We can just say each is exactly 100 and make that assumption, which means each is 20 over – we’re 80 points over the mean. Because we want to know whether we are more or less than 60 points, this knowledge that we’re 100 points tells us “Yes, definitively. We are over that average of 90, we’re over that surplus of 60 points.” So, number one is sufficient.

Number two gives us the opposite information, it talks about the minimum, and, in aggregate, that doesn’t let us know directly whether or not we make those 60 points. That is it’s possible but it’s also possible that we don’t, because we’re dealing with a minimum rather than a maximum or rather we’re dealing with information that can lie on either side of what we need. Therefore 2 is insufficient. Our answer here is A.

I hope that was useful. GMAT nation stay strong, keep averaging. You guys got this! I believe in you. If you want to test your GMAT Data Sufficiency skills, check out the Science Fair problem.

 

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GMAT Calculator & Mental Math - All You Need To Know
Posted on
27
Jul 2021

GMAT Calculator & Mental Math – All You Need To Know

Author: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Ilia Dobrev
Date: 27 July, 2021

Are you allowed to use a calculator on the GMAT? While this may seem as a pretty straightforward question to answer, it does deserve a separate blog post as it hides details that are vital for achieving a top GMAT score not only on the quantitative section, but on the exam as a whole.

Well, the answer is both Yes and No. This article aims to examine the different scenarios where you are allowed to use such a device and how you can make full use of its potential. But, if you are used to doing math with a calculator, do not worry as we have compiled a list of some mental math techniques that you can use to your advantage and even save much important time while still being spot-on with your answers.

Calculator on the GMAT | Explained

  • You are not allowed to bring your own calculator to the GMAT exam.
    According to the GMAC, no personal items are allowed in the exam room of any of the certified test centers.
  • You cannot use a calculator on the Quantitative section of the GMAT.
    Despite the fact that we are so used to using calculators to help us with arithmetic operations, you should not feel intimidated that you are not allowed to use any type of calculator on the GMAT Quantitative section. However, you will be provided with a blank canvas by the proctor of the exam where you will have plenty of space to practice to manually compute any calculations, if needed.

You should not worry as the GMAT exam is not designed to test you on complicated mathematical operations or complex calculations. Instead, the quant section draws from secondary-level math skills like basic algebra and geometry, which are mastered in high school, to test other kinds of abilities like critical thinking, logical reasoning, and problem-solving. In fact, the majority of the Quant questions can (and should) be answered without any calculations beyond estimation. A typical example of how you can use mental math to get to the right answer while saving precious time on the GMAT is the Movie Night combinatorics problem. Another type of common GMAT quant questions are data sufficiency problems, which are also more about reasoning than  calculations. You’ll only need to do basic calculations and can rely on estimation for anything more complicated. If you have to do the math, the GMAC usually keeps the numbers simple and avoids decimals. When you see large numbers or complex fractions, then it’s a good bet that there’s an easier solution path to embark on other than calculating.

Surprisingly or not, a calculator will be provided for use during the GMAT Integrated Reasoning section of the test. This GMAT calculator has the standard basic functions, CE (clear entry) button, C (clear) button, an sqrt function, a % (percentage) button, and a 1/x button that calculates the reciprocal of the entry currently on the screen. Also, there is a row with the standard memory functions

  • MS (memory store) stores the current entry in the calculator’s memory for subsequent use.
  • MR (memory recall) displays the latest number stored in the calculator’s memory so that it can be used for the next calculations.
  • M+ (memory addition) adds the current entry to the value that is currently stored in the calculator’s memory. This button is helpful when you need to add a long series of numbers and don’t want to retype each one.
  • MC (memory clear) erases whatever is in the current memory. You should click this button before every new calculation scenario.

Improve your Mental Math and reduce your Calculator Dependency

Survival Tips & Tricks

Do not overuse the IR calculator.

While you are provided with a basic GMAT calculator during the Integrated Reasoning section, you might not want to use it too often as you’ll waste more time than you’ll save. You can also apply the solution paths you are using in the Quant section to some problems in the Integrated Reasoning section.

Constantly practice Mental Math operations.

A huge morale boost is that mental math operations are easy to learn with some practice. You can add, multiply, subtract, and divide when you pay bills, check out at the grocery store, calculate a tip, etc. without using a calculator.

Make accurate estimations

The key to saving a considerable amount of time on the GMAT exam is efficiency in estimations. Transform numbers to less unwieldy figures like 0 or 5 for the purpose of calculations. You can then browse the answer choices to see which is closest to your preliminary estimate.

Do not use a calculator when you are prepping for the GMAT quant section.

This is a great way to practice mental math operations outside the daily life operations. The test setting and quant context will let you get used to this environment so that you know what to expect on test day.

Familiarize yourself with a basic GMAT calculator and do use its Memory functions.

As this will be your only technical aid during the GMAT Integrated Reasoning section, you’d better spend some time making the most out of it. Especially when you are pressed by time, memorizing calculated values for further operations in the calculator’s memory can be crucial for staying on track with a healthy exam pace.

Guide yourself by looking at the answer choices.

Looking at the answer choices can immediately permit you to eliminate a couple of options. Even if you are pushed by time, you can easily make a more educated decision depending on your reasoning that will boost the chances of picking the correct answer.

Do not freak out if you see large numbers.

Remember that the people who stand behind the GMAT are aware that they are designing questions that are supposed to be answered without using a calculator. This also keeps the arithmetic from being too difficult and gives you the opportunity to apply a more straightforward approach.

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