EA Score
Posted on
18
May 2022

EA Score: How Is The Executive Assessment Scored?

You have already taken, or are planning on taking your Executive Assessment (EA), but you do not quite understand how your EA score will be calculated or assessed. Knowing how your exam will be evaluated and corrected can help you in dividing your time during your exam more efficiently and can also help in the way you plan to approach the exam. You most likely have quite the number of questions that you would like to get the answers to. Well, in this article, we will be breaking down the EA’s scoring method.

What will be discussed is the following; 

  • The EA exam
  • The EA scores
  • The EA score calculation
  • The EA percentiles
  • A list of some of the B-Schools accepting EA scores

1. Back to the Basics

Back in March 2016, the Executive Assessment was announced by GMAC, the creators of the official GMAT exam. The EA was designed to serve professionals who aim to enroll in Executive MBA programs. The test was built to be finished in only 90 minutes, and unlike the GMAT, requires little to no prepping. 

The EA is an assessment to evaluate a candidate’s readiness. That means that the score received is not a tool used to compare all the applicants, rather it is used to see if the candidates are capable of handling the programs they applied for.

If you are a busy professional looking for a way to showcase your EMBA readiness to the admission officers without the stress of preparing for the GMAT, then the EA is just the exam for you.

The EA is divided into three different sections, which are, Integrated Reasoning, Verbal Reasoning, and Quantitative Reasoning

Each of its sections aims to test different skills hidden in its takers. But to get the bigger picture, the whole exam is there to measure skills that are needed in a fulfilling career, as well as, in the Business Programs. These skills include critical thinking, the ability of deep analysis, problem solving, and higher order reasoning. 

There are a total of 40 questions to finish in exactly 90 minutes, as mentioned prior in this article. For a more detailed distribution about that matter, take a look at this table below:

Sections Number of Questions Timing
Integrated Reasoning 12 30 minutes
Verbal Reasoning 14 30 minutes
Quantitative Reasoning  14 30 minutes

2. EA Score

Starting with the picture as a whole, the Executive Assessment has a total score ranging from 100 to 200, with a minimum score of 126, and a maximum of 174, leaving a score of 150 as the midpoint score. 

The three sections making up the EA exam all have equal distribution when it comes to their scoring. The three sections’ scores range on a scale of 0 to 20. 

Something great about the EA is that there is no “passing” or “good” EA score, what matters is your score and all the other factors in your application that make the admission’s decision. But, of course, the higher your total EA score, the better – especially if you are considering a competitive EMBA program

However, for most EMBA programs, their consideration of a “good’’ or “ideal” score would be one equal to 150 (the midpoint score) or above.

3. EA Score Calculation

Your total EA score is the summation of the scores you got on all three different sections, plus 120. Let’s suppose you scored 15 on each section, your score would be: 15 + 15 + 15 + 120 = 165. So, that is the scores of all the three different sections on your EA plus 120. If that was really the case, then you would have scored within the 98th percentile. 

4. EA Percentiles 

Speaking of percentiles, here is all you need to know when it comes to this subject. Percentiles are like rankings that identify where you stand in comparison to the other EA test takers. The higher your total score, the higher the percentile rate, and vice versa. 

Taking the example from above, if you scored 165 in total, that means you are in the 98th percentile. That also means that you were from the rare 2% of all the test takers that scored that specific score and that 98% of the test takers scored lower than your score. 

Here are the Officially published Executive Assessment Percentiles 2021:

    • 0th Percentile: 126 (the lowest score)
    • 10th Percentile: 141 
    • 25th Percentile: 146
  • 40th Percentile: 148
    • 50th Percentile: 150 (the midpoint score) 
    • 75th Percentile: 153
  • 86th Percentile: 156
  • 99th Percentile: 174 (the highest score) 

5. A List of Some of the Schools Accepting EA Scoring

Schools in America: 

Schools in Europe: 

Schools in Asia:

Moral of the Story

To make a long story short, the EA is known to be the perfect exam for busy professionals that do not have the time needed for all the hassle that comes along with the GMAT prep journey. It is an identification of your readiness and your ability to handle the program you applied to. 

If you are looking for professional help to boost your EA performance, head to our official website and book your 30 minutes complimentary assessment session now!

Contributor: Lilas AL-Sammak

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EA Integrated Reasoning Section - All You Need To Know
Posted on
20
Apr 2022

EA Integrated Reasoning Section – All You Need To Know

The Executive Assessment exam is considered to be a relatively short exam for admission to an EMBA program, but it manages to cover a wide range of topics. That being said, knowing the structure of the exam, as well as what to expect on the test day is a huge part of your EA prep.

The Integrated Reasoning is one of the three sections on the EA exam and it is scored from 0 to 18. It requires a complex preparation that will help you develop verbal and quantitative skills, the ability to read charts and graphs, and actually get insights from those charts. In this article, we are going to share with you everything you need to know about the EA Integrated Reasoning section – from what this section consists of to some important aspects of the preparation that you need to consider.

1. What is the Structure of the EA Integrated Reasoning Section?

The EA Integrated Reasoning section is divided into 4 categories – Graphics Interpretation, Table Analysis, Two-Part Analysis, and Multi-Source Reasoning. Each of the categories contains 12 questions. A test-taker has 30 minutes to answer the 12 questions or about 2.5 minutes per question. The 12 questions are divided into two modules of 6 questions each. Depending on the test-taker’s performance in the first module of questions, the difficulty of the questions in the second module varies. The more complex questions you answer in the first module, the more complex you will get in the second module, and eventually, you can get a higher score.

2. What is the Scoring on the EA Integrated Reasoning Section?

All three sections on the EA exam are scored in the same way. The official score on each section is ranged between 0 and 20. The score from each section has the same weight in the EA total score and the final grade.

3. What are the different types of questions? 

There are the four types of Integrated Reasoning questions included in the EA exam:

  • Two-part Analysis

The questions in this category ask you to select two answers from a set of choices presented in a table. The two answers have to be related to each other somehow, so you need to look for some analogy or connection between them. The questions will be quantitative or verbal, a.k.a. based on a mathematical problem or a scenario. Although the questions in this part may seem relatively easy to test-takers, they can be tricky. Sometimes, in these types of problems, you may have very little information to find the relationship between the two answers.  In such cases, you will need to select the only options available that fit that relationship, which may be rather challenging.

Example:

Consider the sets S, T and U, where

S = {35, 14, 64, 23, 49, 67}
T = {x, 35, 14, 64, 23, 49, 67} and
U = {y, 35, 14, 64, 23, 49, 67}

The mean of T is 5 less than the mean of S. The median of U is 9 less than the median of S.

Select the value of x and the value of y consistent with the statements given. Make two selections, one in each column.Two-Part Analysis

 

  • Graphics Interpretation

The questions in this category ask you to work with some information presented in a graph, chart, or some other form of data-visualization (i.e. bar-graph, stacked-bar graph, x-y scatter plot, etc.). You have to analyze the information and select the right answers based on it. The question addresses math concepts such as statistics, correlation, ratios, etc. In this part, it is important to learn how these concepts look graphically and get used to reading the graphs or charts.

Example:

Graphic Interpretation

Refer to the pictograph of a survey of attendees at the annual meeting of an international hotels group. Each symbol represents 13 companies in a sample of 390. Use the drop-down menus to complete each statement according to the information presented in the diagram. If one company is selected at random from the 390 surveyed, the chance that the company will be located in only one nation or headquartered outside of Europe or both is _____

A: 1 out of 6
B: 1 out of 3
C: 2 out of 3
D: 5 out of 6

If one company is selected at random from the 390 surveyed, the chance that the company will be both located in a single country and headquartered outside of Europe is _____

A: 1 out of 6
B: 1 out of 3
C: 2 out of 3
D: 5 out of 6

 

  • Table Analysis

The questions in this category present data in the form of a table and require you to answer Yes/No or True/False questions about the data in the table. You can sort the columns of the table in different ways to make their reading and understanding easier. That is why being able to sort functions effectively could be an essential skill you need to answer the Table Analysis questions. The first step to the solution of each problem is exactly to decide which “sort” function you are going to use. In terms of the topics, one can expect them to be somehow similar to those covered in the Graphics Interpretation category.

Example: 

For each of the following statements, select Yes if the statement is true based solely on the information in the table; otherwise select No.

Table Analysis Part 1

The table shows circulation data, by non-fiction classification, for books in a certain library system in November 2003. Percentages are given to the nearest 0.1 percent.

Table Analysis Part 2

 

  • Multi-Source Reasoning

The questions in this category present some information in the form of multiple texts as each text will be based on a single subject. You need to answer questions that are based on that specific text. You have to work with multiple texts which will include some sort of data. Being able to understand this data will be very helpful to you because you can go ahead and use the insights from that data to answer the questions. As you might have guessed, this category requires you to mix quantitative, verbal, and data-interpretation skills. You have to try to look beyond the most obvious tab and seek information that could be hidden somewhere in the paragraph.

Example:

Definition of musician: Any person who uses a device created to produce sound through blowing air, vibrating a string, striking a surface, or electronic means, or uses parts of their own body, with the intent of creating sound for the purpose of entertainment, communication, self-improvement, education, or production of an emotional response. This definition of musician fails to capture the standard concept of a musician in that it allows for the inclusion of some things that are not ordinarily thought of as musicians, for example, people who _____,

A: play many instruments
B: perform their music as a paid profession
C: turn on a stereo for their own enjoyment
D: write music for the purpose of others performing it
E: work as piano movers
F: teach the history of music

and excludes some things that are ordinarily thought of as musicians, for example, people who _____.

A: play many instruments
B: perform their music as a paid profession
C: turn on a stereo for their own enjoyment
D: write music for the purpose of others performing it
E: work as piano movers
F: teach the history of music

Conclusion

Understanding the structure, scoring, and different types of questions of the EA Integrated Reasoning section will help you to prepare better for the section as you will know what to expect and work on. It is important to develop a strategy on how to tackle the complex and multi-layered problems included in this section. You need to work on your ability to read and analyze graphs and charts, find and evaluate relationships in data, synthesize information from various texts, etc. We know that this may be a challenging task! At Apex we are more than happy to support you on your EA journey and assist you in every step of the process. You can sign-up for a 30-minute complimentary consultation call with one of our instructors who can help you ace any section on your EA exam!

 

Contributor: Diana Materova

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