Posted on
22
Jun 2022

5 Tips to Consider 1 Week Before the EA Exam

Taking any kind of exam comes with some sort of fear and anxiety which is totally natural. You will have certain kinds of tensions, such as the fear of the exam not going well, especially when it’s your first time taking a specific exam. If you have 1 week left before the EA exam, then you are in safe hands, as this article introduces you to 5 useful EA exam tips that will help you overcome the fear and ace the test. 

1. Take Practice Tests

You are all prepared and have 1 week left to take the EA exam. With all the preparation, do you still fear the exam? The most possible way to fight your fear is to practice. Go for the EA practice test. Keep practicing as it is said that practice makes perfect. In a research done by John A. Tures, it has been shown that those who take the practice test outperform those who do not by an average of approximately 15 percentage points. You don’t want to lose that 15%. The practice tests do not give you the exact questions included in the actual exam, but they surely introduce you to the format of the questions. They give you a clue on how the questions might be. Plus, experience also eliminates fear. If you keep practicing, you get to experience the whole exam procedure which diminishes your fear and levels up your confidence on the actual day of the exam. But try not to overuse the practice exams because you don’t want to overwhelm yourself. 

2. Work on Your Time Management Skills

It is much more likely to lose the track of time during the exam. Sometimes we get so obsessed with finding a solution for one question that we forget other questions which have higher points. This stubbornness is not of any help. So, it is important to try to devote a fair amount of time for each of the questions. To this end, you need to manage your time. So, the 1 week that you have is more than enough for you to improve your time management. This could help you to have an idea about the amount of time you need for each question that appears on the EA exam. Overall, there are 40 questions and you are given 90 minutes to solve them. It means that you have 2.25 minutes for each question. During this 1 week, adapt yourself to this timing. Of course, you can have your preference to set the timing based on your knowledge of the three parts. You might want to spend more of your time on one part of the test than on the other. Knowing the level of your knowledge that you have about each part of the exam helps you not lose the track of time. Set a timer and keep practicing to manage your time. 

3. Familiarize Yourself With the Exam

Sometimes not having enough information about the structure of an exam itself is a factor of anxiety or fear so make sure you know everything about the exam. Plus, having information about the exam in handy saves you from all those ‘I didn’t know this’ moments. Digging into some research a week before your EA exam will make you feel more confident and aware. Here is everything you need to know about the EA exam. 

4. Learn From Others’ Mistakes

There is a saying “Don’t go to the doctor, but go to the one who has experienced.”  Those who know everything about the exam (such as the test centers) still know less than those who have experienced taking the exam. Therefore, search for those who have already taken the EA exam. Learn from their mistakes. Consider the tips they offer. Ask them to share their experience with you and what they wished they had done differently. Another option could be reading the testimonials on our website where the students write about their experiences. They give an insight on how to get prepare for the exam especially when you like to be tutored individually. 

5. Feed Your Brain

You don’t want to go to the exam without fully charging your brain. Along with your hands, you will be using your brain the most during the exam so make sure you feed your brain well. Make a good schedule for your sleep as it improves your brain performance. Plus, the Healthline website introduces us to the nine foods (berries, citrus fruits, dark chocolates, nuts, eggs, avocados, fish, beets, red/green/orange vegetables) you need to take to make your brain ready for an exam. If the exam is a battle for you then your brain will be your only weapon. Make sure you reload this weapon. 

 

If you consider all these tips a week before your exam, you will feel much better and readier about the important day that’s coming up. Just don’t demoralize yourself with fear, but rather boost up your confidence by following the above mentioned tips. 

Good luck on your test!

Contributor: Zuhal Qaderdan

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EA Integrated Reasoning Section - All You Need To Know
Posted on
20
Apr 2022

EA Integrated Reasoning Section – All You Need To Know

The Executive Assessment exam is considered to be a relatively short exam for admission to an EMBA program, but it manages to cover a wide range of topics. That being said, knowing the structure of the exam, as well as what to expect on the test day is a huge part of your EA prep.

The Integrated Reasoning is one of the three sections on the EA exam and it is scored from 0 to 18. It requires a complex preparation that will help you develop verbal and quantitative skills, the ability to read charts and graphs, and actually get insights from those charts. In this article, we are going to share with you everything you need to know about the EA Integrated Reasoning section – from what this section consists of to some important aspects of the preparation that you need to consider.

1. What is the Structure of the EA Integrated Reasoning Section?

The EA Integrated Reasoning section is divided into 4 categories – Graphics Interpretation, Table Analysis, Two-Part Analysis, and Multi-Source Reasoning. Each of the categories contains 12 questions. A test-taker has 30 minutes to answer the 12 questions or about 2.5 minutes per question. The 12 questions are divided into two modules of 6 questions each. Depending on the test-taker’s performance in the first module of questions, the difficulty of the questions in the second module varies. The more complex questions you answer in the first module, the more complex you will get in the second module, and eventually, you can get a higher score.

2. What is the Scoring on the EA Integrated Reasoning Section?

All three sections on the EA exam are scored in the same way. The official score on each section is ranged between 0 and 20. The score from each section has the same weight in the EA total score and the final grade.

3. What are the different types of questions? 

There are the four types of Integrated Reasoning questions included in the EA exam:

  • Two-part Analysis

The questions in this category ask you to select two answers from a set of choices presented in a table. The two answers have to be related to each other somehow, so you need to look for some analogy or connection between them. The questions will be quantitative or verbal, a.k.a. based on a mathematical problem or a scenario. Although the questions in this part may seem relatively easy to test-takers, they can be tricky. Sometimes, in these types of problems, you may have very little information to find the relationship between the two answers.  In such cases, you will need to select the only options available that fit that relationship, which may be rather challenging.

Example:

Consider the sets S, T and U, where

S = {35, 14, 64, 23, 49, 67}
T = {x, 35, 14, 64, 23, 49, 67} and
U = {y, 35, 14, 64, 23, 49, 67}

The mean of T is 5 less than the mean of S. The median of U is 9 less than the median of S.

Select the value of x and the value of y consistent with the statements given. Make two selections, one in each column.Two-Part Analysis

 

  • Graphics Interpretation

The questions in this category ask you to work with some information presented in a graph, chart, or some other form of data-visualization (i.e. bar-graph, stacked-bar graph, x-y scatter plot, etc.). You have to analyze the information and select the right answers based on it. The question addresses math concepts such as statistics, correlation, ratios, etc. In this part, it is important to learn how these concepts look graphically and get used to reading the graphs or charts.

Example:

Graphic Interpretation

Refer to the pictograph of a survey of attendees at the annual meeting of an international hotels group. Each symbol represents 13 companies in a sample of 390. Use the drop-down menus to complete each statement according to the information presented in the diagram. If one company is selected at random from the 390 surveyed, the chance that the company will be located in only one nation or headquartered outside of Europe or both is _____

A: 1 out of 6
B: 1 out of 3
C: 2 out of 3
D: 5 out of 6

If one company is selected at random from the 390 surveyed, the chance that the company will be both located in a single country and headquartered outside of Europe is _____

A: 1 out of 6
B: 1 out of 3
C: 2 out of 3
D: 5 out of 6

 

  • Table Analysis

The questions in this category present data in the form of a table and require you to answer Yes/No or True/False questions about the data in the table. You can sort the columns of the table in different ways to make their reading and understanding easier. That is why being able to sort functions effectively could be an essential skill you need to answer the Table Analysis questions. The first step to the solution of each problem is exactly to decide which “sort” function you are going to use. In terms of the topics, one can expect them to be somehow similar to those covered in the Graphics Interpretation category.

Example: 

For each of the following statements, select Yes if the statement is true based solely on the information in the table; otherwise select No.

Table Analysis Part 1

The table shows circulation data, by non-fiction classification, for books in a certain library system in November 2003. Percentages are given to the nearest 0.1 percent.

Table Analysis Part 2

 

  • Multi-Source Reasoning

The questions in this category present some information in the form of multiple texts as each text will be based on a single subject. You need to answer questions that are based on that specific text. You have to work with multiple texts which will include some sort of data. Being able to understand this data will be very helpful to you because you can go ahead and use the insights from that data to answer the questions. As you might have guessed, this category requires you to mix quantitative, verbal, and data-interpretation skills. You have to try to look beyond the most obvious tab and seek information that could be hidden somewhere in the paragraph.

Example:

Definition of musician: Any person who uses a device created to produce sound through blowing air, vibrating a string, striking a surface, or electronic means, or uses parts of their own body, with the intent of creating sound for the purpose of entertainment, communication, self-improvement, education, or production of an emotional response. This definition of musician fails to capture the standard concept of a musician in that it allows for the inclusion of some things that are not ordinarily thought of as musicians, for example, people who _____,

A: play many instruments
B: perform their music as a paid profession
C: turn on a stereo for their own enjoyment
D: write music for the purpose of others performing it
E: work as piano movers
F: teach the history of music

and excludes some things that are ordinarily thought of as musicians, for example, people who _____.

A: play many instruments
B: perform their music as a paid profession
C: turn on a stereo for their own enjoyment
D: write music for the purpose of others performing it
E: work as piano movers
F: teach the history of music

Conclusion

Understanding the structure, scoring, and different types of questions of the EA Integrated Reasoning section will help you to prepare better for the section as you will know what to expect and work on. It is important to develop a strategy on how to tackle the complex and multi-layered problems included in this section. You need to work on your ability to read and analyze graphs and charts, find and evaluate relationships in data, synthesize information from various texts, etc. We know that this may be a challenging task! At Apex we are more than happy to support you on your EA journey and assist you in every step of the process. You can sign-up for a 30-minute complimentary consultation call with one of our instructors who can help you ace any section on your EA exam!

 

Contributor: Diana Materova

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EA Quant Section
Posted on
01
Feb 2022

Executive Assessment Exam (EA) – Quant Section

We know what you’re thinking: math is a scary subject and not everyone can excel at it. When attempting math on the Executive Assessment – better known as the EA – the stakes may seem much higher. Especially since there is a whole section dedicated to math that you need to prepare for. There is good news though, the EA is not actually testing your math skills, but rather your creative problem-solving skills through math questions. Furthermore, the EA Quant Section only requires that you have sound knowledge of high-school-level mathematics. So, you just need to practice your fundamentals and learn how to use them to solve specific EA problems and find solution paths that work to your advantage. 

The EA Quant Section contains a total of 14 questions, and you are given 30 minutes to complete all of them. This gives you about 2 minutes to solve each question, so in most cases, the regular way of solving math equations that you were taught in high school will not cut it. To succeed on the EA you must find the optimal problem-solving strategy for each question type. This can seem a daunting start, so our expert instructors at Apex GMAT recommend that you start your quant section prep with a review. Look over the types of EA questions asked in the test and review the math fundamentals which you may not have been using in your day-to-day life. 

What types of questions will you find in the EA Quant Section?

There are 2 main types of questions you should look out for when preparing to take the GMAT exam:

Data Sufficiency Questions

For this type of EA question you don’t generally need to do calculations. However, you will have to determine whether the information that is provided to you is sufficient enough to answer the question. These questions aim to evaluate your critical thinking skills. 

They generally contain a question, 2 statements, and 5 answer choices that are the same in all EA data sufficiency questions.

Here is an example of a Data Sufficiency Question: 

(1) 9x-1 = 3
(2) 3x-3 = 19

A) Statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2) alone is not sufficient.
B) statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (1) alone is not sufficient.
C) Both statements TOGETHER are sufficient, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient.
D) EACH statement ALONE is sufficient.
E) Statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are NOT sufficient.

Find the answer at the bottom of this article! 

Problem Solving Questions

This question type is pretty self-explanatory: you’ll have to solve the question and come up with a solution. However, you’ll be given 5 answer choices to choose from. Generally, the majority of questions in the quant section of the EA will be problem-solving questions as they clearly show your abilities to use mathematical concepts to solve problems.

Here is an example of an EA problem-solving question from the official GMAC itself: 

In a certain town of 4,000 residents, 40 percent of the residents are registered voters and 25 percent of the registered voters voted in the mayoral election. How many of the town’s registered voters voted in the mayoral election?

A) 400
B) 600
C) 1,000
D) 1,600
E) 2,600

Find the answer at the bottom of this article! 

The main concepts you should focus on

The one thing that you need to keep in mind when starting your EA prep is the level of math you need to know before going in for the Quant section. All you’ll need to master is high-school-level math. That being said, once you have revised and mastered these math fundamentals, your final step is learning how to apply this knowledge to actual EA problems and you should be good to go. This is the more challenging side of things but doing this helps you tackle all the other problem areas you may be facing such as time management, confidence levels, and test anxiety

Here are the 3 main groups of questions on the quant section of the EA and the concepts that you should focus on for each:

Algebra

  • Algebraic expressions
  • Equations
  • Functions
  • Polynomials
  • Permutations and combinations
  • Inequalities
  • Exponents
  • Coordinate Planes

Word problems

  • Profit
  • Sets
  • Rate
  • Interest
  • Percentage
  • Ratio
  • Mixtures

Arithmetic

  • Number theory
  • Percentages
  • Basic statistics
  • Power and root
  • Integer properties
  • Decimals
  • Fractions
  • Probability
  • Real numbers

5 tips to improve your  EA Quant skills

1. Master the fundamentals! This is your first step towards acing this section of the EA. As this section only contains math that you have already studied thoroughly in high school, you’ll only need to revise what you have already learned and you’ll be ready to start practicing some real EA problems. 

2. Practice time management! This is a crucial step as every single question is timed and you won’t get more than 2 minutes to spend on each question. That is why you should start timing yourself early on in your EA prep, so you get used to the time pressure. 

3. Know the EA question types! This is something that you will learn once you get enough practice with some actual EA questions. That way, you’ll be able to easily recognize different question types and you’ll be able to use your preferred solution path without losing time.

4. Memorize the answer choices for the data sufficiency questions! These answers are always the same and their order never changes. Memorizing them will help you save precious time that you can spend elsewhere. To help you better memorize them, we are sharing an easier and less wordy way to think of them:

A) Only statement 1
B) Only statement 2
C) Both statements together
D) Either statement
E) Neither statement

5. Make use of your scrap paper! There is a reason why you’re provided with scrap paper, so make sure to take advantage of it. You will definitely need it to take notes and make calculations, especially for the problem-solving questions that you will come across in this EA section.

Final Thoughts

It’s true that math might seem like a scary subject and that’s why many people fear struggling with the EA quant section. Yet, it can be easily conquered with the right strategy and prep process. You just need to get acquainted with the question types, assess your skill level related to them and work, work, work until you become confident enough to crack that EA Quant section.

Solutions:

EA Data Sufficiency Questions: The answer is D. EACH statement ALONE is sufficient.
EA Problem Solving Question: The answer is A) 400.

 

Contributor: Bilhen Sali

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EA Verbal Reasoning section
Posted on
23
Dec 2021

EA Verbal Reasoning Section – Everything You Need To Know About It

If you are planning on applying for an MBA or EMBA program, and are a busy professional, you probably had the chance to familiarize yourself with the EA exam. Today, we are going to focus on the EA verbal reasoning section. It includes categories such as sentence correction, reading comprehension, and critical reasoning. The verbal section can seem to be a formidable struggle for non-native English speakers. However, non-native English speakers may actually have a leg-up on the competition.

The verbal reasoning part of the EA is designed to measure your ability to read and comprehend written information, reason and evaluate arguments, and write in standard written English. This can seem intimidating as you may not be used to comprehending and reasoning arguments in languages other than your native language. 

The EA Verbal Section: Layout 

To begin with, you will be given only 30-minutes to answer 14 questions. This gives you approximately 2 minutes for each question. Just like the GMAT, the EA is a computer adaptive exam. This means, by answering a question correctly, the succeeding questions will be harder – and vice versa. The Executive Assessment test is also shorter than the GMAT. As mentioned above, there are three question types on the EA verbal reasoning section:

    • Critical Reasoning
    • Reading Comprehension
    • Sentence Correction

EA Verbal Section – Critical Reasoning 

During critical reasoning, the question will provide you with a textual stimulus, often a brief paragraph of 100 words or less, followed by a question and five answer options. The question will always require you to choose one of the five response options and the correct answer is logically related to the input in some way. 

EA Verbal Section – Reading Comprehension

During the reading comprehension, the question will present you with a short or long passage, as well as two or three related questions. You’ll choose one of five response options for each question relating to a passage. Those will be very similar to what you have already learned from probably the SAT, TOEFL, or other standardized tests. 

In the reading comprehension, the passages and question types include a large range of topics. From science and social science to business. Specific detail and inference questions, just like on the GMAT, are by far the most common. Additional Primary Purpose or Main Idea question types also appear on the test. You will be asked to draw a conclusion based on the argument by detecting the flaws, assumptions, and any discrepancies that might be discernible. 

EA Verbal Section – Sentence Correction

The last part is sentence correction. These questions test your knowledge of English grammar and overall written English. A sentence will be partially or completely underlined in response to a question. You must state which version of the statement is the most logical, straightforward, and free of grammar faults by selecting the proper version of the underlined section from a list of five options. There can be idioms, comparisons, parallelisms, subject-line agreement, etc. Even for native English speakers with a good understanding of syntax, these sentences are typically fairly long with a lot of extra description, which can be perplexing. 

EA Verbal Section – Tips

Now that you have some basic understanding of the EA verbal section and what it consists of, it is time to gain some tips and tricks that will definitely aid you during the preparation process and the exam as well. 

1. Try to nail down your thoughts in English

First, we start off by mentioning that you should train your brain to read and grasp the English language. Try to nail down your thoughts in English. When reading a passage try to understand what the writer is trying to convey and focus on the main idea, try to find out whether the author is presenting a point, argument, telling, or criticizing someone. Even though the EA verbal section is not something that you may encounter every day, you can still find daily sources of practice: like an academic journal or podcast produced by major news outlets such as the New York Times or Wall Street Journal.  

Another approach is to surround yourself with a lot of different words, whether that means doing a daily crossword puzzle or watching English news. Even when you have some leisure time, immerse yourself in English literature. Those can include fiction, magazines, or just stories. You might think that the process can be overwhelming and time-consuming, however, these skills will stick with you throughout your professional and academic careers. It is true that mastering the language comes naturally rather than learning words and idioms by heart, but remember that you are not learning the language from scratch, you are adapting to the format and academic English. Before preparing for the Executive Assessment you should already know the language and be able to recognize all common question types with focused attention and analysis. 

2. Work on your memorization skills

Besides being a good reader and being able to absorb information, work on your memorization skills. Navigate through the words quickly and effectively. Even if you do not understand a certain word or a phrase, being able to navigate through it will strengthen your abilities to feel the language and comprehension skills. When you first start studying, concentrate on one idea at a time. For example, first, focus on your vocabulary and reading, then focus on the grammar and sentence correction. For sentence correction, you can begin with your basic high school materials and some simple rules. 

If English is not the language you frequently use, then take the time to practice EA-related questions. Stick to one concept for a few days before moving to another subject.  Be sure to REVIEW, REVIEW, and REVIEW! No matter what you are planning to study at this point make sure to get back to it and review. Be realistic in the time you are setting aside to study, but never forget to return and fill in the gaps again time after time.

3. Learn how to skim

Learn how to skim. Rapid eye movement during the EA verbal reasoning section is vital. Skimming will help you detect the crucial keywords and get a general idea of the text. Another tip is to look at the answer choices before skimming through the passage so that you know what to be on the lookout for while reading the text. In the beginning, go at your own pace, then start skimming, keeping the time constraints in mind, with this technique the overall experience will be more easily adaptable and accessible for you. 

4. Try to understand something in your own words

The last piece of advice that we are going to give for your EA verbal preparation, is to try to understand something in your own words. If there is a passage or question that you cannot get through just try to put things in your own words and figure out what the answer is in your words and then transform it to an academic language. You are maybe in a word labyrinth, but there is always a way out. The EA verbal section can be baffling with convoluted questions, however, you are able to rephrase everything according to your own convenience and get out of the labyrinth easily. 

 

Final Thoughts 

In this article, we covered the EA verbal reasoning basics. Be sure to develop a study regimen with appropriate time allocation based on your lifestyle. For most people, the Executive Assessment requires an average of about 80-100 hours for most people to adequately prepare for a top score of 155 or above. Remember that by familiarizing yourself with the most fundamental content areas you will expedite the process of acing the verbal section. You secure a good score on the EA verbal portion by putting in hours of focused, targeted practice. Do whatever it takes to truly grasp the subject. Do not be scared of the unfamiliar, make it familiar.

 

Contributor: Ruzanna Mirzoyan

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EA Stress
Posted on
25
Nov 2021

How To Keep Your Sanity While Preparing For The EA

EA Stress

Experiencing too much anxiety over the EA exam might cause a negative impact on your mental health and make it difficult for you to keep your sanity. Moreover, it might even make it more challenging to concentrate when studying and disrupt your sleep schedule. However, with the correct test stress and anxiety-busting tactics, as well as an effective studying schedule, your EA exam preparation may become much simpler.

Here are 7 tips we recommend in order to make your EA exam preparation stress-free and effective.

1. Take an EA Preparation Course

Everyone’s EA experience is different. Some people can get a high score based on everything they already know, without opening an EA book. But, for most students, a preparation course or one-on-one prep time with an EA personal tutor is necessary for two reasons. First, it puts you in the right direction in terms of exam content, strategies, solution paths, and tactics to tackle problems, by helping you structure a concrete and designated studying plan. Secondly, it makes you feel much more confident and emotionally calm, as you work with a trustworthy and experienced professional who knows the ins and outs of the exam and preparation for it and can assist you with anything necessary throughout the process. Apex GMAT, for example, offers complimentary consultation calls for interested individuals, looking for structured and personalized EA preparation. 

2. Create an Effective EA Study Schedule

Don’t wait for the perfect time to take the EA. This moment may never reveal itself! Life will always throw you curveballs and can end up curtailing well-thought-out plans. Situations may arise which could interfere with your EA preparation. During your EA prep, you should take the extra effort to harmonize any unexpected situations with your study schedule.

One effective method you could try is to divide your studying schedule into multiple time frames throughout the day so that you can concentrate in smaller doses rather than studying for 5-7 hours straight and losing your ever so vital focus. Study the materials during the weekdays and devote some part of your weekend to practice tests where necessary. Those, in turn, will help you to assess your progress and help you to understand your main strengths and weaknesses.

3. Control Your Emotions

At some point, the EA will stress you out, making you feel disappointed and frustrated. This is natural! Whether it is an unsatisfactory score on a practice test or the feeling of giving up, the EA can make it easy to have an emotional breakdown. However, it is important to be able to take control of your emotions, and have a “never a failure, always a lesson” attitude. Every time you make a mistake, try to dive deep into that specific concept and figure out why you made that particular mistake, and learn from it. This is exactly how you make progress. Whenever you feel like you can’t go on anymore, remember your goals and aspirations, and that this test is a key to the completion of those. With the proper frame of mind, you will find yourself studying again in no time.

4. Maintain a Connection to Your Support Team

The people you communicate with during your EA preparation process are very important and can hugely affect your frame of mind. Try not to isolate yourself too much from them, spending your whole time in your room cracking all those EA books and practice tests. Instead, spend time with the people whose presence is pleasing to you, who support and believe in you – whether it’s your family, your best friend, or the new acquaintance that has no idea what the EA even is. Constant communication with the people you love will positively affect your overall mentality and help you stay positive when preparing for the test.

5. Get Some Rest and Good Sleep

Another essential thing to remember is to arrange your sleeping schedule. When you need to get up at a certain time, subtract half an hour from the number of hours you wish to sleep. This time becomes the designated moment for turning off the lights. The extra half-hour is crucial, as we frequently overlook the time it takes to get ready for bed, set the alarm clock, and so on. This being said, be cautious as to what you are eating or drinking as an unhealthy diet can negatively affect your sleep schedule. Although the effects of caffeine may differ from person to person, try to avoid all sources of caffeine after 3 p.m. and modify accordingly. Aside from coffee, caffeine is found in a variety of foods and drinks, including tea, chocolate, and carbonated beverages. However, there are benefits to caffeine products when consumed thoughtfully. 

6. Celebrate Your Big and Little Achievements

Your EA preparation process aims to help you reach your goals! Reward yourself a little – take a moment and celebrate your achievements – whether it is seeing progress on practice test scores or a new reading tactic that you finally mastered. It will help you feel more positive and confident about your overall knowledge and skills and be brave enough to challenge yourself with tougher concepts. As you progress down your EA journey, be sure to celebrate your short- and long-term accomplishments. These moments of celebration will undoubtedly assist you in keeping yourself on top of your game.

7. Doing Things You Love

Nothing can ever make you happier than doing what you love. Whether it’s singing, dancing to your new favorite pop song, or watching movies, you should devote some time to distracting yourself from studying by doing the things you enjoy. Not only will this help you not to feel pressured and overwhelmed by all those EA materials, but it will also make you feel much more energetic, full of life, and HAPPY. These are absolutely necessary for you to perform as well as possible on your EA test.

 

Contributor: Nemrout Safarian

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EA Prep Calendar
Posted on
23
Nov 2021

How To Create The Perfect EA Prep Calendar?

Congratulations, you have decided to continue with your education! Deciding to attend business school is a big step. It will open up doors to further opportunities for you, both intellectually and professionally. Having an EMBA under your belt can help you earn that promotion or pay raise in your professional career. Regardless of why you are deciding to attend business school, one large hurdle stands in your way, the Executive Assessment. 

For many, the EA can seem like a daunting task. Especially for those individuals who are returning to school years after completing their undergrad. But the task of successfully studying for and taking the EA is doable. As long as you are driven, determined, and willing to set a strict study schedule, your business school dreams are within your grasp. 

Here at Apex GMAT, we have created the perfect EA prep calendar for future EA test takers. By following the simple steps we have laid out, you can get the most out of your EA preparation and ace your exam! 

Steps to your Perfect EA Prep Calendar

First, grab a calendar, yearly planner, or your phone. You will need to mark the dates and times necessary for studying. 

1. Figure out when you want to take the EA

So, you want to go to business school. Once you have figured out what type of program you want to attend, you need to find the perfect business school program for you. For most business schools an EA entrance exam is required. Some schools offer EA waivers, however, these are rare and are usually offered on a case-by-case basis. Once you have found the programs you are applying to, check out their application deadlines. Based on these deadlines, you can figure out when you need to take the EA.

It would be suggested to take the EA well before the admissions deadlines. Often, your EA scores last at least 5-years, meaning you could technically take the EA a few years before you apply to business school. However, here at Apex, we suggest you take the EA a couple of months before the admissions deadline. This is because, if you happen to get a score lower than expected, you will have time to retake the test and aim for a higher score. 

Count back 3 months from the test date. THIS is the day you will begin your official EA test prep. 

2. Take a free practice test

Before you even begin studying for the EA, you need to take a practice exam. By taking a practice exam, you will know right away where your strengths and weaknesses are. It will also give you a baseline to know how to study and which parts of the exam require the most effort from you. By keeping track of your score, you will also see your progress as you go along your EA prep journey. 

Determine strengths and weaknesses

3. Capitalizing on when you can best prep 

Are you a morning bird? A night owl? Do you find your brain works best during the afternoon? Knowing this about yourself can help you set your daily study schedule. If you find that your brain works best bright and early, then try to carve out an hour or two each morning to study before heading off to work or going to class. If you enjoy studying late at night, then find time after work or after dinner where you can spend two hours preparing. Once you have decided what time of day you want to study, it is important to keep a daily schedule. It is best to find a rhythm that you work best with so that your mind and body are prepared to study each day. 

Are you a Morning Bird? A Night Owl? 

4. Create An EA Study Plan

Great. You have decided on your test date, you have counted backward by 3 months, and you have determined what time of day you wish to study. Pull out your calendar, yearly planner, or phone and write down the content you want to cover during each week.

Week 1 – EA Basics

Put aside 1 or 2 hours each day in either the morning or the night where you study for the EA. During this first week, you will get acquainted with the EA Test Basics. 

    • Become familiar with the EA format and content. Prepare yourself for what you are about to encounter during the next 3 months and on the day of your EA exam. This includes getting comfortable with the EA structure, sections, timing, and scoring.
    • Analyze the results from your EA practice test. As you are in the process of reviewing the results of your practice test, it would be helpful to ask yourself some questions to better understand the difficulties you encountered. When analyzing the solutions of some questions you got wrong or maybe you weren’t totally confident about, take note of any patterns. What section/s did you find most challenging? Which types of questions within each section were you struggling most with? Also, don’t forget to ask yourself questions about the “bigger picture” like: Were you able to finish every section? Did you feel anxious? How did you feel at the end of the test?

Week 2 – EA Integrated Reasoning Section

Great, it’s week two! During your first week, you have overviewed what to expect on the EA overall. Now it is time to get a little bit more specific. Keeping your same daily schedule (whether you study in the AM or PM), change your study content to familiarize yourself with the EA Integrated reasoning section. Read about which types of Integrated Reasoning questions and content that you are most likely to come across during your 3 months of preparation, mock tests, and the EA test.

    • Review EA questions. Before diving deeper into preparing for this section, take some time to read about the types of questions the logical reasoning section asks. Make flashcards with the different EA question types so that you are prepared when you encounter the graphics, tables, and multi-source reasoning associated with the Integrated Reasoning section. If you found that during the practice test the Integrated Reasoning section was easy-breezy, consider studying exceptionally difficult problems.
      The EA is computer adaptive meaning as you answer successive questions correctly, you will be given increasingly harder questions to answer. Additionally, when you encounter a moderate or ‘easy’ question where answering quickly can save you time for a more difficult section.
    • Learn the underlying EA concepts related to each topic. In this section, you will come across information presented in multiple formats. Learning how to pick up on patterns and analyze the data can be fundamental to finding the solution to the problems. In order to not get stuck during the exam and waste your precious time, learning about the most frequently used EA concepts is helpful.

Week 3 – EA Verbal Section

It’s week three! Bearing in mind how you have been studying for the past two weeks, be sure to maintain your same study schedule for this week. During this week it is time to get acquainted with the EA Verbal section. A great way to start working with the Verbal section is to become familiar with the overall structure of this section. This section is 30-minutes long and is broken down into 3 sections. Questions test your ability to analyze arguments and understand, edit and read written English. 

    • Learn how to tackle each type of question. There are three types of questions in the Verbal section (Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and Sentence Correction) and their purpose is to test certain skills. This means that for each of them you have to use particular strategies.
      • Tip. It’s more effective to concentrate on one area at a time. So, while preparing for this section, choose one subsection and stick with it for a couple of days. For example, your third week could look something like this: Monday & Tuesday Reading Comprehension, Wednesday & Thursday Critical Reasoning, and Friday & Saturday Sentence Correction, with Sunday being a rest day. 

Week 4 – EA Quantitative Section and Monthly check-in

    • Review your EA Math. Before diving deeper into preparing for this section, take some time to brush up on some of the formulas, definitions, and topics of the Maths section. Make flashcards with the necessary formulas so you can memorize which formula should be used for which problem(s). If you found that during the practice test the quantitative section was easy-breezy, consider studying exceptionally difficult problems given that the EA is a computer adaptive test.
    • Learn the underlying EA concepts related to each topic (percents, ratios, exponents, statistics, etc). In this section, you will come across some specific wording that can be fundamental to finding the solution to the problems. In order to not get stuck during the exam and waste your precious time, learning about the most frequently used concepts is helpful.

By the end of the week, it will have been a month since you started studying. If you have stuck to your study schedule, you have most definitely made progress. Now it is time to put that progress to the test! 

    • Take your second practice test. As the saying goes “Practice makes perfect.” The more you get yourself exposed to EA  practice exams, the more likely you are to achieve your desired score.
    • Review your results. While looking at the answer explanations, pay attention to the solutions of the questions you got incorrectly.
    • Practice the type of questions you are having difficulties with. Identify the questions where you are spending more time than you should. Read some articles that recommend tips, strategies, and tactics that can assist in solving them faster. 

Week 5 – EA Integrated Reasoning Section Review

It is week five, and you now have two practice tests under your belt. You should be seeing progress in your ability to take the exam. Time to refine your reviewing and fortify your strengths while strengthening your weaknesses in the Integrated Reasoning section. 

    • Practice and enhance your knowledge of tables and graphics, multi-source reasoning, and two-part analyses. Now that you are familiar with these terms it’s a good time to start reading some strategies on how to tackle these EA types of questions. After doing that, practicing what you just learned by solving problems focused particularly on these types of questions is extremely beneficial to your progress. 

Week 6 – EA Verbal Section Review

    • Practice and enhance your knowledge of EA Verbal questions. You can find articles about tips specifically about these types of questions and while practicing you be sure to make use of them. Another practical thing to do is read about articles related to common mistakes and how to avoid them. 

Week 7 – EA Quantitative Section

    • Make yourself acquainted with the EA Quantitative section. This is the step that, as you have seen so far, applies to every EA section. You can’t anticipate doing well on a task without knowing what is expected from you.
    • Review EA Data Sufficiency and Problem-Solving questions. This is something that might come in handy when encountering a tough question on test day. 

When it comes to the EA Quantitative section make sure to practice. practice. practice. Working on answering multiple questions in a day. This will help you master your timing and get used to the structure you may see on the EA. 

Week 8 – Monthly Progress Check

    • Time for another EA practice test! After studying for almost every section, taking some mock tests will assist in keeping track of your progress.
    • Review your results. This time try to identify the topics you are still not comfortable with. Solely taking EA mock tests without analyzing the explanations to questions is not going to be much help.
    • Practice the type of questions you are struggling with. After analyzing these practice tests and understanding the patterns of your weaknesses, working more on the questions you find challenging leads to score improvements.

Week 9 – Review your Weaknesses, Solidify your Strengths

You have been spending a lot of your time preparing for the EA. It is an arduous journey, but you’re not alone! During week 9, it is best to spend time reviewing the parts of the exam that you are most struggling with. Whether it is Verbal or Quantitative, spend a few hours a day reviewing those parts of the exam that you are most worried about. 

At the same time solidify your strengths. If you are a powerhouse on the logical section, that doesn’t mean you should no longer study that portion. Switch between your strengths and weaknesses during this week in both the Verbal and Quantitative sections. If you know of someone else who is taking the EA, get together with them and swap tips and tricks on how they are tackling studying. Finding a study buddy is especially helpful as you can both be emotional support from one another! 

Week 10 – Time and Stress Management

Some other significant factors to consider while working on preparing for the EA  test are time and stress management. A good start is reading a handful of blogs and articles that suggest many tips and strategies that can help you improve your time and stress management skills.

Week 11 – Review and Relax 

During the last week don’t put a lot of pressure on yourself. Instead, try to take care of your mind and body as much as you can. One last brief review focused primarily on the sections or type of questions you struggled most with is going to be enough. Finally, the most important tip, don’t forget to enjoy your EA preparation journey.

 

We at the Apex team hope that you find this EA study plan helpful. If you want to discuss your progress and possibly have some 1 on 1 preparation sessions with us, we would be happy to help, set up a complimentary consultation call with an EA instructor.

 

Contributor: Dana Coggio

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EA procrastination
Posted on
18
Nov 2021

5 EA Study Habits To Incorporate Now To Avoid Procrastination

You have everything prepared. Your desk is neat and tidy, your books are placed perfectly within reach, your computer is on, and your flashcards are written. Perhaps you have brewed a fresh cup of coffee and have just settled in with every intention to study for the next few hours. But lo and behold, 3 hours later, you find yourself glued to your phone, having wandered down the youtube rabbit hole and watching your fifth 20-minute video on how paint dries! 

You can’t help but be frustrated with what just happened. And it happens more often than people would like to think. Whether it is spending hours cleaning your room or gazing wistfully out the window, procrastination is every student’s worst nightmare and biggest foe. When studying for the EA, you will encounter opportunities to procrastinate around every corner.

So how do you overcome these distractions?

We have 5 tips and tricks which you can incorporate into your study schedule to avoid EA procrastination. Whether you are just starting out, or you are already months deep into your study schedule, these habits can be incorporated now and follow you throughout your EA journey and into your professional future. 

1. Acknowledge when you procrastinate

Maybe you are staring out the window because it is a beautiful day, or you are maddeningly vacuuming your home because it’s been needing to get done. Regardless, you’re procrastinating. And the first step in overcoming procrastination is to admit when you are procrastinating. If you find yourself in the middle of a cleaning session, there is no need to stop in the middle of your task. Rather, re-evaluate why you are cleaning. Is it to avoid studying or is it because you’ve been meaning to vacuum for a while. Regardless, finish what you are doing. Finish vacuuming, finish staring out the window, finish cooking or cleaning. While completing your task, however, begin thinking about your study schedule. What will you be studying and for how long? Once you complete your procrastination task, sit down and begin studying. You should have spent the last hour(s) mentally preparing for the studying session, and by the time you are ready to begin your body and mind should be fully primed. 

2. Create a list and a reward system 

Yes, this may sound cliche, but lists (and rewards) help! Before sitting down to study, write out what you are planning on doing during the session. Create a list with high-priority and low-priority tasks. Establish a rewards system. What do you crave most when studying? Do you want to take a walk? Clean? Chat with a friend? After completing a high-priority task, reward yourself with a cleaning session, or a quick walk around the block. This will keep you on your toes and create a rhythm which your body adapts to. 

3. Free yourself of perfectionism 

It’s important to expect the best for and from yourself. However, striving for perfectionism on a daily basis can lead to stress and anxiety. Be realistic in what you can accomplish while studying for the EA. Not every day will be a perfect study day. But studying every day, whether perfect or not, will bring you one step closer to achieving your EA goals. Also, recognize that you may not find the perfect time to study every day. Some days are more full than others. On days where studying is difficult to sit down and accomplish, find time in between the chaos to review old concepts. Whether it is flipping through vocab flashcards or attempting a couple of math problems, any form of studying is worth doing (whether perfect or not). 

4. Improve your surroundings

The age of technology is full of distractions. We suggest putting away unnecessary technology. If necessary, put your phone in another room, set it to silent, and close all unnecessary tabs on your computer. If you study better with music, we suggest listening to music which is calm and without lyrics. Lo-Fi study beats, for example, are opportune for the studying brain to zero in and focus on the task at hand. Additionally, make sure your desk and study center is free of clutter. This removes visual distractions and forces you to focus on the studying materials lying directly in front of you. If you live with multiple people, let them know that you have blocked out a certain number of hours for studying and ask them to not distract you during this time. 

5. Forgive yourself

Shoulda, coulda, woulda. We hear this a lot. But what is in the past is already behind you! So don’t fret about trying to fix what has already passed. Instead, train your focus on the task that lies in front of you, and trust that you will make the best decisions for your study schedule going forward. 

Your EA score and future business school opportunities are dependent on how hard you are willing to work for it. EA procrastination is a normal part of studying. Developing habits now which can help you manage your procrastination will make a world of difference during your EA journey.

 

Contributor: Dana Coggio

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EA Tips
Posted on
11
Nov 2021

EA Tips – 9 Daily Practices for EA Prep Success

Preparing for a business school admissions exam can be cumbersome and tedious, especially if you are a non-native English speaker and have a strong desire for making your time manageable. In this case, you need to consider the Executive Assessment test, which is in most of the cases considered to be the “mini GMAT”. EA test is designed to fit into your flexible schedule and career which will help you study more efficiently and productively. Even though this might sound relieving, coming up with a study plan is vital in all cases. You need to determine for yourself, how much time you can set aside each day for the EA exam. Now the thing is to decide how to design a plan that actually works.

The paramount thing that you should consider is keeping track of your study habits and not studying less than intended. As you have already noticed EA prep does not require strenuous effort. Having some useful tips in front of you will even make the experience more manageable. You need to have specific goals for each day to become more accountable for your daily actions.

EA Tips for test preparation 

In order to do this more effectively, we offer nine tips for the EA test preparation that will help you address your lowest and weakest points. Even though every individual taking the exam has different expectations, you should gain greater focus by prioritizing your day along with EA preparation. Sticking to a daily routine is an integral part of life; the most difficult thing is adhering to it, avoiding procrastination, and maintaining motivation. Therefore, after learning all the exam basics, such as the timing, the sections, and the preparation materials, it is worth creating a checklist by using our recommended tips.

1. Visualize success and the value you will get in the end

The thought of success can create happiness! Once we attain something that seemed hard initially, the suspense wears off, and the excitement rapidly comes in. By taking time every day to imagine achieving your goal you can stay motivated and on the right path. When we experience happiness our brain releases serotonin, the hormone responsible for happiness. By keeping the picture of accomplishment in our mind’s eye each time, the happiness never fades away.

Hence, if every day contains even a tiny drop of happiness, even the most complex struggles seem to be a joy. Whether the EA exam is a struggle, as a busy professional, happiness and motivation are something that one undoubtedly needs. Do your best to look at the bigger picture and think of the steps that will expedite reaching the top.

2. Review the EA sections

As EA might imply uncertainty and confusion in your head you should definitely review all three sections daily. You need to make sure that the question types and the overall formulation are a piece of cake at the end. Whether you have a private EA tutor or are studying on your own, be sure to focus on up-to-date EA materials, as the exam slightly differs from other standardized tests for your MBA application. Since there are three sections on the exam, integrated reasoning, verbal and quantitative – each lasting 30 minutes – you need to pay strong attention to those three sections only.

As you might have discerned there is no writing section on the EA exam. Hence, instead of looking at other exam questions and wasting your time on learning things that will not pop up on the exam, choose wisely between your study materials. The section review phase of your day may involve doing quizzes or even allocating some time daily to practice an entire test with a timer in order to keep pace with timing and question types. You can consider this form of revision as stretching your brain muscles before the main exercise. Doing a simple EA section review or a short quiz each time will make you more cautious about time management and remind you about the type of questions that might pop up afterward. 

3. Set a time limit for each day

As it is said, time is the only non-redeemable commodity, so proper allocation is a fundamental key to success. Hence, determining how much time you exactly need to allocate each day will foster productivity and make you avoid EA burnout.

Try to study every day at the same time by finding the right spot in the day when your brain picks up and retains the most out of the bunch of materials and information, which rapidly sinks in. You can even think of studying some time for weekday preparation and extending on the weekends. Try to pick the time that is the most convenient for you and does not overwhelm you with more stress during the day. Just know that EA preparation takes around 4-8 weeks for most people which includes 1.5-hour study sessions each day to cover all the necessary material.

As the hour allocation differs from person to person, you can wake up early and study before going to work or have some time for a late evening preparation. Whichever applies to you, stick to a routine as even though EA has an advantageous time allocation strategy, find the best time and choice for you to study. Ensure the limit you set for yourself is reasonable because procrastinating one day and doubling the hours the next day does not seem plausible. It does not matter how many months you have on your hands; the significant thing is precise allocation. Remember that time is the most expensive investment you are making. Never forget that your study-life balance should be of utmost importance. 

4. Do not forget to reward yourself

It is no secret that having overcome the EA exam releases all the weight from your shoulders. However, during the process, it is essential to think of the rewards. Sometimes your body just needs to do nothing and forget about everything you have learned. Even though this might sound counter-intuitive, there are times when you need to prepare without studying. Therefore, not having small rewards in front of you every day will drain your energy.

Breaks ease your mind allowing better integration and memorization of concepts. These rewards rejuvenate your broken concentration. You can try something like the Pomodoro Technique. This technique helps break down time into intervals with short breaks. Learn to use a timer. For example, during a 1.5-hour study session, you can set a  timer to study for 45 minutes then rest for 10 minutes and get to work again for another 45 minutes. You can think of something ‘non-EA related’ during that 10 minutes that will make you regain focus. For example, by grabbing a quick snack, meditating, or walking around the house.

Even though the EA exam by itself and the preparation as well is pretty short, you incorporate it into your busy schedule, which can sometimes be depleting. For avoiding such grinds on your body and mind, even taking a break for one day can sometimes be the best action. Whichever works best for you, make use of it; even those brief respites retain your stamina.

Finally, never forget about the grandiose reward; your final score. Always remind yourself of the one thing you are putting arduous effort into. Remember possible competition; maybe your friends are also preparing, think about the bragging rights after you have a successful finish! 

5. Forget about the target score, only focus on improvement

EA preparation practices do generate plight both in physical and mental states if you give yourself the opulence of time to study more than necessary. It is crucial to remind oneself of the improvement phases. We agree that everything you are going through is for the final score, but focusing too much on it deteriorates the mental support you could get by concentrating on what you are gaining from that experience. All successful practices dictate that you should focus on one thing at a time, which improves every day until the exam day.

For instance, you can first focus on flashcards and memorization tactics and then move to the actual study session where you delve into each question type and execute some of your analyzing skills. When the exam day comes, you will utilize all the knowledge and effort to get the highest EA score possible. Keeping daily track of your improvements relieves some of the weight. Even the tiniest advantage acquired can be a game changer. For instance, finishing each section a minute earlier than before will eventually contribute to achieving more significant results on the exam day. 

6. Give yourself a pep talk 

You probably already receive a lot of support from the people surrounding you. However, self-encouragement is of the utmost importance and the only thing that maximizes your effectiveness to the fullest. Look around, see what others are doing at your age and inspire yourself. Choose wisely between the tradeoffs. Such as choosing to study instead of partying. Giving a short talk to yourself every day will make you more enthusiastic about reaching your objectives.

A recent scientific study has shown that talking to yourself dwindles anxiety and stress while boosting performance. This is no less true for exam and test prep. Give yourself motivational and instructional speeches and reiterate the same order daily. Both methods promote positivity as motivational talks cheer you up and keep up the eagerness to study and strive for more, while self-instructional talk directs detail-orientation and accentuates what exactly you need to do for that particular day. For example, start every day by loudly stating what should be done for the day. It helps with thinking about the mechanisms of every individual task and visualizing methods to complete them correspondingly. 

7. Be your own critic

Of course, you need all the encouragement and self-support to reach your goals, but especially during EA exam preparation, you need to criticize yourself. Remember that you can only take the EA exam two times, so criticize appropriately. If you need a 150+ EA score you should put the above of modest effort. Give yourself credit on what you are doing right, but also consider aspects of the EA problems that you need to elaborate on and master additional skills.

The EA is not the only requirement in applying to an MBA program. Even though more than 100 schools globally currently accept the EA exam results, remember that besides nailing on the exam, top graduate schools do not come easy, which is why learning to grow from the beginning will come in handy even after taking the EA and being admitted to the desired university. The dominant thing is separating the action from the person because you are criticizing your actions and not you as a person; you should not humiliate yourself, detect the triggers of low performance and failure and make yourself accountable for such actions. Ultimately, the ability to discern your flaws and work on personal evolution is an inherent quality for capacitating your abilities and aptitudes and pulling it off in life. 

8. Strategy is important 

As you already might know from applying to an undergraduate program, preparing for a test that measures your critical, analytical, and problem-solving abilities is bothersome. So it is crucial to come up with a plan that develops an EA test strategy. Your organization efficiency and strategizing skills will be the first and foremost things to aid in your success and aim. You need to think like you are taking the test in 12 hours for example and try to obtain a unique approach which will involve having a non-traditional mindset.

Which sections would you work on the most? How fast can you adapt yourself with the exam pace? In order to have the answers to these questions you must spend decent time on your strategy review and have a clear mindset on what you are working on. Once familiarizing yourself with the format and question types, you need to dig into the real preparation, while strategizing the process and fitting it into your assessment priorities and expectations.

9. Be confident and remember that everything is in your hands

Have you ever thought about the law of attraction? It is basically a belief that everything you imagine is accomplishable. As positive thoughts bring in positive outcomes you should believe in yourself. Of course, maintaining a solid focus on your weaknesses is important, but you should intuitively know that you are the one who is capable of transforming weaknesses into strengths. Sometimes during practice tests and even the exam, you can trust your gut feeling, because if you have studied enough your instincts may sometimes subconsciously rationalize your final decision.

The EA exam is designed in a way that you do not have time. This means sometimes bailing on the questions can be the most useful option. However, instead of bailing try to use your gut feeling. So whenever your consciousness hesitates, the subconscious mind comes into play by literally forcing you to choose the correct answer. Just make sure to dedicate enough of yourself to setting up a study and practice plan for executing some of the most significant strategies. The thing is to never doubt confidence and face the situation with your head up. 

Final Thoughts on EA Tips 

We do understand that the EA preparation may bring in some trepidation. However, make sure to follow our recommendations. Create a daily checklist and think of other tips that may be useful to you. EA prep will help you use time more productively and make you become strategic. Of course, physical preparation is essential, but the mental direction is just as important, as you need to have the mental focus on your goal and the determination of how you will reach it.

Whether you have an EA private tutor or not, you are your tutor, and it is on you to maintain motivation during the entire process and ace the exam. We suggest you develop an EA strategy along with these nine tips to attain greater productivity, address your weaker points, and eventually manifest superb performance. Make studying for the EA a daily habit, and keep yourself posted on the EA advice, techniques, and instructions APEX always provides you with as concentrating only on the score will not amplify the methods and techniques you use to approach each question. Building up more practice is something that will retain your track and focus and make you avoid EA anxiety.

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How Difficult is the Executive Assessment
Posted on
10
Jun 2021

How Difficult is the Executive Assessment?

By: Dana Coggio
Published:  10th June 2021

How Difficult is the Executive Assessment?

As subjective as that question is, you are not the first person to be asking it. When comparing the Executive Assessment to the GMAT a general conclusion has been reached that this test is easier. As it is geared towards individuals who have already been working in the field of business and management for quite some time, there is an expectation for people taking the exam that they may not have an exorbitant amount of time put towards studying and preparing. At 1.5 hours, the Executive Assessment takes only half as long as the GMAT. Quant questions on the exam are geared towards individuals who have been out of school for quite some time, and thus may not remember basic high school or college math techniques so some of the quantitative sections that you would find on the GMAT are not on the Executive Assessment, such as Geometry.

Even the format of the exams is not as strict as that of the GMAT. During the exam, you will have the ability to jump around from question to question within a section. Unlike the GMAT, where each question is successive without the possibility to review, the EA gives you the possibility to return to questions to redo or review them. Keep in mind, however, that you will not receive any additional time to review your questions.

Taking all this into account, it is quite impossible to give a quantifiable answer on whether or not the EA is difficult. Given its structure and the amount and type of questions, it can be assumed that the Executive Assessment test is easier, if not of the same caliber, as the GMAT test.

Structure of the EA

Simply put, the Executive Assessment test is designed and structured to best cater towards individuals who may be too busy with work, family, or other important priorities to commit to the GMAT. Meant for EMBA programs, the Executive Assessment is similar to the GMAT in that it tests and measures your complex judgement, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills.

The Executive Assessment is a 90-minute exam split up into three sections and scored between 100 and 200 points. The three sections are the Verbal Section, the Quantitative Section, and the Integrated Reasoning Section. (Feel free to click on the links to read more on these sections – as they may appear on the GMAT – and how to study for them). All three sections are 30-minutes in length, with the Verbal and Quantitative sections having a total of 14 questions and the Integrated Reasoning having 12. Similar verbal and quantitative questions can be found on both the Executive Assessment and the GMAT. The Integrated Reasoning Portion, on the other hand, is weighted exactly the same as the other two sections. This is different than on the GMAT where the Integrated Reasoning is weighted less than the other sections.  

Another striking difference between the GMAT and the EA is how it is administered online. Unlike with the GMAT, those who take the EA are given the opportunity to review their answers and change any responses they would like. Another difference is that the EA’s Quantitative and Verbal sections are section adaptive (compare that to the GMAT which is question adaptive. You can read more about the structure of the GMAT HERE.) The sectionality of the EA means that there are two subsections within each portion of the test that consists of 7 questions each. This is an advantage for the test taker as, at the end of each section, you have the possibility to review your answers and change any responses within the subsection. 

Percentiles of the GMAT vs EA

There is little data available on Executive Assessment scores and their impact on school admissions. This is because the Executive Assessment first came out in 2016. The Executive Assessment has published that a score of 150 ranks an individual as being in the 50th percentile, though more percentiles have not been released. That being said, preliminary data show that a score of 168 and above places an individual within the 99th percentile.

As with the majority of admissions processes your score is just one of many factors that is taken into account when you apply for an EMBA program. However, for admission to a top-tier EMBA program, scoring above a 150 is very important. Even better would be to score above a 163 which would set you apart from other applicants. If you are interested in EA prep materials or finding a private tutor to help you in your journey to reach your goal click HERE.  

How the EA is scored

The Executive Assessment score ranges from 100-200. However, according to GMAC, it is not possible to score lower than a 120 or higher than a 174. Thus, scoring above a 160 makes an applicant more competitive. Because the Executive Assessment is designed for individuals who have quite a few years of practical experience under their belt, the questions on the exam are meant to draw upon the knowledge you may have gained during your work experience. That being said, you should still take the time to study for the exam so that you can answer the questions being asked within a narrow timeframe. Just like with the GMAT, study materials for the EA are available as well as tutors who can help you achieve your desired score. More information on various prep materials can be found HERE. If you are interested in learning more about a potential EA tutor, you can set up a complimentary call with an APEX instructor HERE

 

Where the EA is accepted

Many top-tier business schools accept your EA exam results. The following schools are some (but not all) which do accept the EA exam in place of the GMAT for their EMBA Programs:

  1. Chicago Booth   
  2. INSEAD   
  3. Duke Fuqua  Yale School of Management
  4. Emory – Goizueta Business School   
  5. NYU – STERN         
  6. Berkeley Haas          
  7. ESMT Berlin  UNC – Kenan Flagler Business School        
  8. London Business School
  9. University of Oxford Vlerick Business School      
  10. University of Pennsylvania – Wharton 
  11. MIT Management. Sloan School        
  12. IE Business School     
  13. University of Virginia                

 

 

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executive assessment test
Posted on
03
Jun 2021

All You Need To Know About The Executive Assessment Online

by: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Uerda Muça
Date: 3rd June 2021

As a consequence of the Covid-19 pandemic almost every exam has to now be taken online, including the Executive Assessment. Since this was an unprecedented situation, it has taken some time to adjust to these changes. When introducing something new, it is understandable that many questions might arise. So, in this article, you will find all there is to know about the Executive Assessment Online Exam. 

What is the EA Online?

The Executive Assessment Online is an online and remote proctored version of the Executive Assessment. This interim solution was developed to assist both test-takers and schools during the closure of the test centers as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic. The new online format intends to assist those applicants who are working on meeting their upcoming application deadlines. 

What important information should you know about EA Online?

How long is the EA Online?

The timing for the Executive Assessment Online hasn’t changed; it is still 90 minutes, 30 minutes per section. Apart from the 90 minutes, we suggest setting aside 15 minutes before the exam starts for the check-in process. During this process, you will be asked to show a valid government-issued ID that has a recognizable and recent photo (e.g. passport or driver’s license). Also, your identity will be verified via facial recognition technology, meaning that you will have to show your face on the camera of the device you’re using. 

What is the structure of the Online EA?

The format of the Executive Assessment Online has remained the same as the structure of the Executive Assessment exam delivered in test centers. The exam includes 3 main sections: Quantitative Reasoning (14 questions), Verbal (14 questions), and Integrated Reasoning (12 questions). Besides the number of questions per section not changing, the types of questions you should expect in each section haven’t changed either. 

How is the Executive Assessment Online scored?

The scoring algorithm and the scoring scale used in the test center-based version are used for the Section Score and Total Score in the online version of the Executive Assessment. The total scale of the exam ranges from 100 to 200 while the scale for each section varies from 0 to 20. Even though the IR section has fewer questions than the other two sections, they are weighted all the same when determining your total score. 

When is the Executive Assessment Online available?

Since it is an online version of the Executive Assessment, appointments are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. An appointment can be scheduled up to 24 hours before an available testing window. 

Who can take the Executive Assessment Online?

If you’re wondering if there are any requirements you have to fulfill in order to take the Executive Assessment Online, the answer is no; it’s open to all test takers. However, due to regulatory and local data privacy rules, the Executive Assessment Online is NOT available in these locations:

  • Cuba 
  • Iran
  • Mainland China
  • North Korea
  • Sudan

Who will protect the exam’s integrity?

As mentioned, the Executive Assessment Online is a remote proctored exam. Just like in the Executive Assessment taken in a test center, human proctors are going to monitor you (your session and your workspace). The only difference is that the whole process is supported by AI technology. Something else to keep in mind is that your assessment (audio feeds and live video) is going to be recorded. 

Quick tip. Don’t forget to ask proctors for help if you encounter any issues. Just click on the chat link within the OnVUE application or wave your hand to speak to the proctor.

How often can I take the Executive Assessment Online?

You can take the Executive Assessment Online up to two times. However, a really important clarification to make here is that these two attempts provided by the online version of the exam are independent of any attempts completed in a Test Center. Also, if you happen to go through some technical issues and are required to take the test again, it doesn’t count as an extra attempt. 

As per your second online attempt, it can be scheduled before or after your first online test. Keep in mind that there should be at least 16 days between the two appointments, meaning the second appointment has to be scheduled at least 16 days after your first attempt. 

How much does the Executive Assessment online cost?

The registration fee for the Executive Assessment Online is $350 (USD) and you don’t have to worry about costs associated with rescheduling since free unlimited reschedules are included in this price and also you will get your scores without any extra cost. However, if you decide to cancel your appointment, a $100 (USD) cancellation fee applies.

Important!  No appointment changes can be made within 24 hours of a scheduled appointment time.

Since it was first introduced in March 2016, the format of the Executive Assessment has not changed, and adapting to the new online version might take some time. However, now that you know what to expect in terms of the format, scoring, and availability of the exam, the process of adaptation is going to get smoother. 

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