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Posted on
21
Jan 2021

Rope Problem – Graphic Solution Path

Hi guys! Today we’re going to look at the rope problem. And this is a fairly straight forward problem with an excellent graphic solution path. But there are some obstacles in our way to that graphic solution path.

Obstacles To Avoid

The first thing to watch out for here is the phrasing of the problem. You’ll notice it is phrased in an awkward way: rather than telling us where the rope is cut, it tells us one length relative to the other. The other obstacle is that we immediately want to jump into the math. Either setting up an algebraic equation or, otherwise, not visualizing the rope.

And this is an error not because it’s that much more difficult to do it mathematically, but because it’ll take you a bit more time and it will be less clear. You won’t be as confident in your answer choice relative to actually being able to see it.

Visualize the Problem

So, what you want to do is visualize the actual rope. And we’ve got one right here. So, if this is 40 feet long, and one side is 18 feet longer than the other then we wanna take the 18 and make that the longer piece, and then the other two pieces are distributed among the short side and the rest of the long side. Once we have that we can say, well, if this long part here is 18, then these two pieces must be 22 they also must be equal. And this is much quicker and clearer than setting up an equation 2x+18 = 40

We’re doing the same thing but here it’s easy to say: okay, 11; 11+18 is 29, that gets us our 40. And we’re there, we’re confident, we move on.

This is a great example of a straightforward problem that can be done in 15 seconds and if you’re doing it in a minute you’re spending too much time. Hope this helps, and we’ll see you guys next time!

For other problem related to this, try out the Test Averages Problem.

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Posted on
15
Jan 2021

Counting Primes Exponent Inequality – GMAT Problem

Today, we are looking at counting a primes exponent inequality problem. Despite all those scary terms, this one is actually fairly straightforward once you master the ability to count prime factors.

Counting primes is all about understanding how many versions of each prime are necessary to construct the entire prime factorization of an integer. In this problem, we are comparing 25s and 5s and we are being asked how many 25s versus how many 5s there are.

Notice how we are not diving into the math immediately. We are first putting this in terms of counting only. 5 to the 12th means that we are actually multiplying 5 by itself 12 times. Like this: 5x5x5x5x5x5x5x5x5x5x5x5. We can now say we have 12 fives. The question then becomes: how many 25s is this equivalent to?

We are now looking for inequality by forming a baseline of equivalents. We now understand how much too many or too few would be. The key question here is how many 5s make up 25? The answer is not 5: we are not dividing or multiplying. 2 prime factors of 5 make 25. 5×5. That is 25=5 square. We wouldn’t know how many 25 it takes to hate more than 12 5s. Where each 25 is the equivalent of 2 5s, 6 25s is the same as 12 5s. So, we need now a 7th 25 in order to have more 5s than the 12 5s on the other side.

And that is our answer: 7. Answer choice B.

For additional problems like this, especially counting primes and number theory problems, check out these videos. 

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Posted on
14
Jan 2021

Averages Problem No.1 : Test Averages

Hey guys, today we’re going to take a look at the test averages problem. This is a very straightforward mathematically oriented average problem or at least it can be. But there are very strong graphic solution paths here and there’s also a really strong sort of intuitive running tally counting solution path here. We’re going to start out with the math though, just because that’s how a lot of people are familiar with this problem. Before we jump into the heavier duty quicker sort of stuff. 

Doing the Math

So to solve this problem we want to take an average. But one of the components of our average is missing. So we have four things with an average of 78, and a fifth unknown. That means we can assume that each of the first four exams were 78. So we’ve got 4 times 78 plus X over 5. The total number of exams is going to give us our average of 80. Then through algebra, algebraic manipulation we multiply the 5 over, we get 400 equals 4 times 78 plus x. The 4 times 78 is 312. We subtract that off the 4 and that brings you to 88. Answer choice E.

Graphic Solution Path: Poker Chips

Let’s take a look at this a little differently. One of the ways I like looking at averages is imagining stacks of poker chips and you can have stacks of anything. I like poker chips because they fit together and you can make two stacks equal very easily so what we’re being told here is we have four stacks of 78 a fifth unknown stack but if we equalize them all that is if we take chips off of the unknown stack and distribute them all the stacks will be 80. That means that the fifth stack needs to be 80 and then it needs two poker chips for each of the other four stacks to bring those 78’s up. We can also envision this as just a rectangle our goal is 80 but we have 78, and our goal is five tests but we have four so we have 78 by four here. And then 80 by 5 here what’s missing is the full 80 and then 2 on each of four stacks of 48.

Running Tally Method: Intuitive Approach

The most powerful way to handle this problem though is probably by doing a running tally. Don’t even worry about the visualization but rather notice that, I’ve got 47 8s each of those are too short so I’m two, four, six. eight points short on the last test. I need to get the 80 that I want plus those eight points that I’m short bringing us to 88. And anybody who’s sweated like A+, B+, A- or a C+, B- has done this math. So if you characterize it like that a lot of times it becomes much more intuitive and once again allows you to cultivate confidence for a deeper treatment and more complex averages problems and mean problems check out the snack shop problem, check out the company production problem and there’s a great ds problem that we do the trade show problem you’ll find links to all of them just below and I hope this helped. 

 

Enjoyed this Averages Problem ? Try another type of GMAT problem to get familiar with all question types on the exam: Remainder Number Theory Problem.

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Posted on
17
Sep 2020

Which Is The Greatest – GMAT Problem

Today we’re going to look at a GMAT problem that screams for estimation but can really tie you in knots if you don’t have the right pivot question, the right perspective. Of the following which is greatest? And on its surface this would seem like a straightforward question except of course the GMAT being the GMAT they’re going to give you a bunch of numbers that are going to be hard to interpret. One part of this problem is simply training. The square root of 2, the square root of 3, the square root of 5. These are common, especially root 2 and root 3 because we see them a lot on triangle problems.

Get Familiar With Identities

And knowing these identities by heart as an estimate is really, really valuable just for being able to get a bearing whether you’re on a geometry problem and you’re trying to navigate or make sure that your answer seems correct or if you’re in a problem like this knowing these identities root 2 is 1.4, root 3 is 1.7, root 5 is 2.2 is useful as a touchstone.

Break Down The Problem

But this problem in general and the greater problem can be broken down not by saying oh well this is 1.4, this is 1.7, but by asking ourselves well logically which is bigger which is smaller. Remember it’s a multiple choice exam and they’re asking for the biggest or the smallest or whatever it is but these are opportunities to compare not nail down knowledge and this attitude is exceptionally vital for the data sufficiency but it crops up in problem solving a lot more than people might care to admit.

Especially if you’ve been there just trying to study and study and study and get to a precise answer on a lot of these things. So, let’s start just by taking a look at a few things. First square root of three square, root of two which one’s larger? If you said root three you are correct. How much larger? That might be a little bit more difficult to ascertain but if you say 1.7 versus 1.4 maybe 20 percent larger 3 is 50% larger than 2 so root 3 is going to be some smaller percentage larger than root two. But either way we know that root three is the bigger one it’s going to be the dominant value so the question becomes how much larger? Or which part of the answer drives the answer choice?

What Do We Know?

So we know that the integers 2 and 3 are more meaningful, larger than the square roots because the square roots are components of those integers. So between A and B, a drives the question that is the three drives the root two more than the two drives the root three. We can take a look at the following two and notice that both of them are around root three.

That is if we take apart the ugly part, which is the square root and take a look at the rest of it – four over five, five over four, these numbers are about one and compared to the two root three we have and the three root two which we’ve already decided is even stronger we don’t really need to entertain C and D all that much. Just to understand that oh they’re about a root three and that’s not going to be enough.

Looking At Answer Choice E

Finally, we have E. E is a little funky but we can ask ourselves how many times will root 3, will this 1.7 go into 7 and we get this answer that it’s a bit below 4. Compared with 3 root 2 which is 4.2 (3 times 1.4), we still have a driving the answer. You guys see how this is a marriage of doing a little bit of estimation but also really keeping your framing as is this greater or less than. Now we’ve included a bunch of other different answer choices here for you to take a look at play around with it and see if you can get yourself familiar with comparing these things because the GMAT is only going to come at you with things like square roots that are unfamiliar.

So it’s a fairly defined GMAT problem in that sense. I hope this helps, questions below, like us, subscribe, keep checking in and we’ll see you again real soon.

If you enjoyed this GMAT problem, try these problems next: Probability problem, and the Speed Distance problem.

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Posted on
12
Feb 2019

Profit & Loss Problem Form

The profit and loss problem form that this problem fits into is one that has strong DSM’s into mathematics. Here we are tempted to do the math in part because that’s so easy. It’s so available to us.

This is characteristic of a mid-level arithmetic problem where there’s some shifts and shimmies but overall it’s a fairly straightforward problem that utilizes no more than the four basic operations. So on the one hand this profit and loss problem is pre-algebra or even sort of grade school math. On the other this makes the solution path much more elusive.

Solving the Problem Using Math

So of course we can follow the math. We can add up all the costs, five thousand plus two dollars, times twenty thousand. Then contrast that with the revenue that comes in which is 12×20,000. But then we’re left with the ugly division problem that brings us to the profit per t-shirt. This is where the GMAT sticks us.

Instead of handling this in aggregate it’s strongly preferable to handle it with a higher level solution path. Let’s take a look at a few:

Higher Level Solution Path: Distribution

One way to do this is to distribute the fixed cost over the cost per t-shirt. This is actually a lot easier than it seems. Twenty thousand t-shirts, five thousand dollars, five over twenty is one-quarter.

Therefore, it costs one-quarter per t-shirt in addition to the two dollars in variable cost. So twelve minus two is equal to ten dollars, minus one quarter is equal to nine dollars and seventy-five cents.

Higher Level Solution Path: Graphical Equalization

We can also use a graphic equalization method in order to get to the same conclusion. If the numbers were more complicated, understanding that that shift is one-quarter down. That is the fixed cost is one-quarter down.

Then we know we’re looking for something that ends in a seventy-five cents. That allows us to eliminate all the answer choices that don’t end in 0.75. Then we can use scale to determine that 9.75 is the correct answer.

Practice Problems

There are more complicated versions of this problem form. In particular, I’d encourage you to explore being told that the t-shirt company is breaking even. Then determining the amount of variable costs or fixed cost that’s there or even the production run. Similarly, you can be given a target profit or loss, the break-even just being the zero, so it’s a bit easier and have to reverse engineer the relationships.

Once again, this doesn’t have to be done algebraically. As you begin to appreciate the subtlety of the ratio between costs production run and total P&L all of these problems should be simplified and should be very straightforward.

Continue your GMAT practice with the Wedding Guest GMAT problem.

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