5 GMAT Study Habits To Incorporate Now To Avoid Procrastination

5 GMAT Study Habits To Incorporate Now To Avoid Procrastination

You have everything prepared. Your desk is neat and tidy, your books are placed perfectly within reach, your computer is on, and your flashcards are written. Perhaps you have brewed a fresh cup of coffee and have just settled in with every intention to study for the next few hours. But lo and behold, 3 hours later, you find yourself glued to your phone, having wandered down the youtube rabbit hole and watching your fifth 20-minute video on how paint dries! 

You can’t help but be frustrated with what just happened. And it happens more often than people would like to think. Whether it is spending hours cleaning your room or gazing wistfully out the window, procrastination is every student’s worst nightmare and biggest foe. 

When studying for the GMAT, you will encounter opportunities to procrastinate around every corner. So how do you overcome these distractions? We have 5 tips and tricks which you can incorporate into your study schedule to help you avoid GMAT procrastination. Whether you are just starting out, or you are already months deep into your study schedule, these habits can be incorporated now and follow you throughout your GMAT journey and into your professional future. 

1. Acknowledge when you procrastinate

Maybe you are staring out the window because it is a beautiful day, or you are maddeningly vacuuming your home because it’s been needing to get done. Regardless, you’re procrastinating. And the first step in overcoming procrastination is to admit when you are procrastinating. If you find yourself in the middle of a cleaning session, there is no need to stop in the middle of your task. Rather, re-evaluate why you are cleaning. Is it to avoid studying or is it because you’ve been meaning to vacuum for a while.

Regardless, finish what you are doing. Finish vacuuming, finish staring out the window, finish cooking or cleaning. While completing your task, however, begin thinking about your study schedule. What will you be studying and for how long? Once you complete your GMAT procrastination task, sit down and begin studying. You should have spent the last hour(s) mentally preparing for the studying session, and by the time you are ready to begin your body and mind should be fully primed. 

2. Create a list and a reward system 

Yes, this may sound cliche, but lists (and rewards) help! Before sitting down to study, write out what you are planning on doing during the session. Create a list with high-priority and low-priority tasks. Establish a rewards system. What do you crave most when studying? Do you want to take a walk? Clean? Chat with a friend? After completing a high-priority task, reward yourself with a cleaning session, or a quick walk around the block. This will keep you on your toes and create a rhythm which your body adapts to. 

3. Free yourself of perfectionism 

It’s important to expect the best for and from yourself. However, striving for perfectionism on a daily basis can lead to stress and anxiety. Be realistic in what you can accomplish while studying for the GMAT. Not every day will be a perfect study day. But studying every day, whether perfect or not, will bring you one step closer to achieving your GMAT goals. Also, recognize that you may not find the perfect time to study every day. Some days are more full than others. On days where studying is difficult to sit down and accomplish, find time in between the chaos to review old concepts. Whether it is flipping through vocab flashcards or attempting a couple math problems, any form of studying is worth doing (whether perfect or not). 

4. Improve your surroundings

The age of technology is full of distractions. We suggest putting away unnecessary technology. If necessary, put your phone in another room, set it to silent, and close all unnecessary tabs on your computer. If you study better with music, we suggest listening to music which is calm and without lyrics. Lo-Fi study beats, for example, are opportune for the studying brain to zero in and focus on the task at hand. Additionally, make sure your desk and study center is free of clutter. This removes visual distractions and forces you to focus on the studying materials lying directly in front of you. If you live with multiple people, let them know that you have blocked out a certain number of hours for studying and ask them to not distract you during this time. 

5. Forgive yourself

Shoulda, coulda, woulda. We hear this a lot. But what is in the past is already behind you! So don’t fret about trying to fix what has already passed. Instead, train your focus on the task that lies in front of you, and trust that you will make the best decisions for your study schedule going forward. 

Your GMAT score and future business school opportunities are dependent on how hard you are willing to work for it. GMAT procrastination is a normal part of studying. Developing habits now which can help you manage your procrastination will make a world of difference during your GMAT journey.

Contributor: Dana Coggio

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Important GMAT Online Updates
Posted on
06
Oct 2021

Important GMAT Online Updates – Beginning October 20, 2021!

By: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Dana Coggio
Date: October 6, 2021

The coronavirus pandemic has changed a lot of things, the GMAT™ exam is among them. With the integration of online solutions over the past year and a half, the official Graduate Management Admissions Council has made the decision to make some of these changes permanent. As the GMAT is now permanently available online, the GMAC has decided on implementing important GMAT updates which will offer more cohesion between online and live testing platforms. 

  • Scoring Policy Update 

On October 20th, 2021, online delivered GMAT exams will come with 5 free score reports. Test takers have 48-hours to utilize these score reports. Any additional score reports can be sent for the standard fee. Also, the online platform will continue to offer test takers the flexibility of viewing their score report before deciding to send their scores to the programs of their choice. 

  • More Online GMAT Testing Opportunities! 

The GMAC took test taker feedback to heart. This means they have decided to allow for retesting options across delivery channels. This will help test-takers who may have intended to take the exam at a compromised test center. Additionally, test takers will not have a limited number of online testing options. Rather, their online tests will count towards the total number of GMAT exam attempts – 5 in a rolling 12-month period and a total of 8 in their lifetime

These adjustments offer test-takers:
– Flexibility in their schedule
– More prep and application strategies
– Additional opportunities for performing their best on test day

  • Online Pricing

The last update affects the GMAT Online pricing. Online fees for the GMAT exam (including registration, reschedules, and cancellations) will align with in-person, test center fees located in the same region. 

 

Important to keep in mind is that these GMAT Online Updates take effect on October 20, 2021.

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Why Should You Hire The Most Expensive GMAT Tutor?
Posted on
05
Oct 2021

Why Should You Hire The Most Expensive GMAT Tutor?

By: Apex GMAT  
Date: October 5, 2021

You’ve made up your mind and have decided to hire a GMAT tutor to guide you through the process of preparing for the GMAT exam. Your goal is to get a good enough score to get accepted into your dream MBA program. But how can you decide which GMAT tutor to hire when there are so many different tutors out there? Well, we’ve got the answer for you: hire the most expensive GMAT tutor on the market. Here’s why:

You could argue that “the most expensive,” doesn’t necessarily mean the best, but in our case it actually does. Our clients’ GMAT scores are proof of that. After working with Apex GMAT, Justin managed to go from a 580 to a 710 and landed a place at the University of California’s Haas School of Business. David managed to break through the 700 mark and achieve a score of 750 on the exam, going on to attend Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business for his MBA.

Besides the hundreds of clients that we have worked with to achieve scores within the 700 range, all of our tutors have scored 770 and above on the exam. They have many years of teaching experience both outside of the GMAT and within the GMAT sphere, so they know the test in and out.  With the customized one-on-one tutoring experience that clients get from working with Apex tutors, they are sure to receive a premium service with stellar results. 

In this article, we’ll tell you more about what working with the most expensive GMAT tutors on the market can offer you and 3 reasons why you should hire him/her.

GMAT Tutoring is an Investment!

The first thing to keep in mind is that working with an elite GMAT tutor does not come at an average GMAT tutoring price. Thus, you should not be expecting an average GMAT preparation experience. From the first call with us until your successful GMAT score, admissions to B-school, and beyond, Apex tutors are there to lend a hand. Instead of thinking about your GMAT prep as a stage in the application process,  consider it as an investment in your educational journey.

If you select the correct tutor the first time around, you can actually save money on tutoring, grad school costs through scholarships, and develop relationships with mentors who will be willing to help you at any stage in your academic and professional life. Attending one of the top business schools in the world is a commendable achievement and attaining a great GMAT score can open that door for you. The only thing that will almost guarantee you that awesome score is hiring the best GMAT tutor to help you prepare and we’re here to make that happen for you.

You’ll get a Premium GMAT Tutoring Experience! 

By working with the most expensive tutors you are affording yourself the opportunity to work with experts, whose goal will be to successfully guide you through the process. You’ll also receive a higher level of expertise and personal attention than with a medium-priced service. With the personalized approach that is offered by our tutors, each tutor strives to provide clients with the most efficient and effective preparation for success. By personalizing the service to your strengths and weaknesses, you have the opportunity to improve your skills in a shorter time frame. 

Still not sure why our service is more expensive than others? For a more detailed explanation, watch this video.

How an Expensive GMAT Tutor Can Help you?

Now that you have a better understanding of what the most expensive GMAT tutor offers, here are 3 reasons why you should hire one to help you prepare for the GMAT: 

Overcoming scoring plateaus!

Working with an instructor that has many years of experience means that you are in good hands. They will have a deep understanding of the test and its structure which makes it easy for them to guide their clients to elite 700+ scores, no matter their academic background or starting GMAT score. They have worked with hundreds of clients and they will instantly know what your situation is and how to teach you for success. By using a personalized approach with every single client, they can easily pinpoint your weaknesses and will help you work on improving them. The end results are bound to be better than if you’d study on your own or prepare with a medium-priced service. In this case, the premium service you get definitely justifies the price you pay. 

They will lead the way to the top MBA programs! 

You don’t want a great GMAT score just for the sake of it. The end goal is to land a place at one of the top Business Schools out there, so that’s why nailing the GMAT exam is so essential to your future. That being said, working with instructors that have continuously worked with numerous students towards that same goal is the best way to go about it. These instructors know what each of the top MBA programs is looking for in terms of GMAT scores and how a certain GMAT score can boost your application. They will also have connections to the top programs you’re intending to apply to and will be able to give you advice on how to stand out as an applicant.

A mentor for life!

This experience won’t just provide you with an instructor that will guide you through the GMAT exam. Instead, you’ll get to nurture a relationship with a mentor who will have your back for life, mentoring you through any stage of your academic and professional journey. Use your mentors’ experience to advise you about the best business schools, the right path thereafter, job interview and pay negotiation advice, business advice, and networking for success.

Make sure to check out our top 5 GMAT tutors that operate globally and take pride in their expertise before you decide on which one to hire.

Now that you have a better understanding of the importance that the most expensive GMAT tutor has when it comes to your future, you are ready to make that decision.

Make the smart decision and invest in your future!

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How to study for your GMAT retake
Posted on
28
Sep 2021

How To Study For Your GMAT Retake – GMAT Preparation Strategies

By: ApexGMAT
Contributor: Dana Coggio
Date: September 28, 2021

You’ve studied countless hours, canceled plans with numerous friends, and even changed your diet and caffeine consumption to fuel your brain as best as possible. And yet, after all that, your final score result is just a 650. Not bad, but also not perfect. This score can get you into most Business School programs, but can it get you into that elite ‘top’ school you are aiming for? If you have the resume and top-notch essay responses to back up your GMAT score, then you may feel comfortable applying to your dream Business School with that score.

But what if you are still unsure? Is it worth spending the hundreds of dollars, and continuing the stringent study plan you had just spent months trudging through to try again? Perhaps a second attempt means you will bump up your score to a 700+, or maybe your second attempt will land you with a score of equal or – gulp – lesser value! After going through the cost-benefit analysis of such an undertaking, you may have decided on the undertaking of retaking the GMAT.

But how do you study for the GMAT the second time to guarantee a higher score? You are not alone in asking this question, and, unfortunately, there is no ‘one-size-fits-all’ answer or study plan that can guarantee a higher score and make the retake worthwhile financially and timewise. However, there are some things you can begin doing now which can help you embark on your GMAT retake journey.

Book the retake sooner rather than later

Deciding on ‘when’ to retake the GMAT can have a huge effect on your ability to succeed in the test. We suggest booking the retake sooner rather than later. This will help set a definite timeline of how long you must study and how you can expect to structure the coming weeks. Additionally, don’t wait months to retake the GMAT. Once you have decided that you will retake the exam, be sure to schedule it a couple of weeks after the last test you took. While it may seem to be a time crunch, this is because you are not starting from scratch when studying for your retake. You already have a whole host of wealth stuck in your head! It will hang around for a few weeks, requiring only brief reviews and refreshers to keep the knowledge up to date.

Focus on your weaknesses

So, you have taken your first GMAT test. You now know how you test under time pressure, and you can adjust your studying accordingly. Did you find that you struggled with the time constraints? We suggest focusing on different studying methods which will help you feel more comfortable under the time constraints. During the test you may realize that you did not study enough for certain quantitative-type questions, or your GMAT vocabulary was lacking. In this case, spend time before your retake focusing on the areas you found most challenging. By no means does this mean ‘ignoring’ your strengths, rather, spend the most time on your weaknesses, being sure to set aside a few hours a week to review and rehash the parts of the exam you feel most comfortable with.

Consult with your network

Whether you recognize it or not, the people around you are important to your mental health and wellbeing. Because studying for the GMAT is a mentally draining venture, relying on your network can help you get through the most difficult aspects of studying for the GMAT. As you already experienced over the last few months of studying, an effective student may opt for moments of quiet study rather than social events with friends and family. This doesn’t change your second time around taking the test.

However, your friends and family may be disappointed to hear that you are extending your absences from events further to study for your second round. It is important, then, to confer with them. Let them know what you are doing and why. Perhaps someone in your network had a similar experience and they can offer you advice and tips on how to rock your second round. Additionally, do not be shy to let them know how you are feeling and how they can best support you during your studying. This can help alleviate any further stress you may accumulate during the time you sequester away over the books.

Get a private tutor

It may seem obvious but hiring a private tutor who specializes in the GMAT can help push you to the next level. Often, your struggles with the GMAT can be alleviated by the unique perspectives and solution paths a private tutor can give you. Our GMAT tutors at ApexGMAT specialize in working with students who want to achieve an elite score and are looking to develop the skills to do just that. We invite all interested potential clients to sign-up HERE for a complimentary consultation call where we can discuss your GMAT and Business School goals. Our tutors are happy to work with an array of clients. Whether it is their first or fifth time taking the GMAT and whether they have 6 months to prepare or just a few weeks, we can work within your time frame and skill level to help you achieve your goals.

 

Finally, deciding to retake the GMAT means countless more hours of hard work. Deciding whether it is worth it is up to you. However, being prepared for the process of retaking the GMAT can help alleviate the stress of the decision.

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How-to GMAT: No Calculator? Use These Mental Math Tips Instead
Posted on
07
Sep 2021

How-to GMAT: No Calculator? Use These Mental Math Tips Instead

The GMAT is an exam largely focused on numbers and numerical data. And while doing math on the GMAT should be avoided sometimes it is inevitable. True, the test-taker is given a calculator for the duration of the Integrated Reasoning section but the same cannot be said for the Quantitative Reasoning Section. 

This article is going to provide some smart calculation shortcuts and mental math tips to help you go through some arithmetical questions without losing too much time and help you get a higher score on the GMAT Quant.

The Basics

Before explaining any methods for dividing and multiplying with ease, let’s make sure we have revised a few simple rules:

  • Numbers with an even last digit are divisible by 2 – 576 is and 943 is not;
  • Numbers with a sum of digits divisible by 3 are also divisible by 3 – 3,465 for example (3+4+6+5=18);
  • If the last 2 digits of a number a divisible by 4, the number itself is divisible by 4 – 5,624 for example (because 24/4=6);
  • Numbers with last digit 0 or 5 are divisible by 5;
  • Numbers that can be divided by both 2 and 3 can be divided by 6;
  • Similar to numbers divisible by 3, numbers divisible by 9 must have a sum of digits divisible by 9 – 6,453 for example;
  • If the last digit of a number is 0 it is divisible by 10;

With that out of the way, we can move onto some more advanced mental math techniques.

Avoid division at all costs

Don’t divide unless there is no other option. And that is especially true with long division. The reason why long division is so perilous is that it is very easy to make a careless mistake as there are usually several steps included in the calculation, it takes too much time, and to be honest, few people are comfortable doing it.

Fortunately, the GMAT doesn’t test the candidates’ human-calculator skills but rather their capacity to think outside the box and show creativity in their solution paths, especially when under pressure – exactly what business schools look for.

However, sometimes you cannot avoid division, and when that is the case remember: Factoring is your best friend. Always simplify fractions especially if you’ll need to turn them into decimals. For example, if you have 234/26 don’t start immediately trying to calculate the result. Instead, factor them little by little until you receive something like 18/2 which is a lot easier to calculate.

A tip for factoring is to always start with smaller numbers as they are easier to use (2 is easier to use compared to 4, 6, or 8) and also look for nearby round numbers. 

If you have to calculate 256/4 it would be far less tedious and time-consuming to represent 256 as 240+16 and calculate 240/4+16/4=60+4=64. Another example is 441/3. If we express it like 450-9 it is far easier to calculate 450/3-9/3=150-3=147.

Dividing and Multiplying by 5

Sometimes when you have to divide and multiply by 5 (you’ll have to do it a lot) it would be easier to substitute the number with 10/2. It might not always be suitable for your situation but more often than not it can be utilized in order to save some time.

Using 9s

With most problems, you could safely substitute 9 with 10-1. For example, if you have to calculate 46(9) you can express it as 46(10 – 1) which is a lot more straightforward to compute as 46(10) – 46(1) = 460 – 46 = 414

You can also use the same method for other numbers such as 11, 8, 15, 100, etc:

18(11) = 18(10 + 1) = 180 + 18 = 198

28(8) = 28(10 – 2) = 280 – 56 = 224

22(15) = 22(10 + 5) = 220 + 110 = 330

26(99) = 26(100 – 1) = 2600 – 26 = 2574

Dividing by 7

The easiest way to check if a number is divisible by 7 is to find the nearest number you know is divisible by 7. For instance, if you want to check if you can divide 98 by 7 you should look for the nearest multiple of 7. In this instance either 70, 77, or 84. Start adding 7 until you reach the number: 70 + 7 = 77 + 7 = 84 + 7 = 91 + 7 = 98. The answer is yes, 98 is divisible by 7 and it equals 14

Squaring

When you have to find the square of a double-digit number it might be easier to break the number into components. For example, 22^2 would be calculated like this:

22^2
= (20 + 2)(20 + 2)
= 400 + 40 + 40 + 4
= 484

Similarly, if you have to find the square of 39 instead of calculating (30 + 9)(30 +9) you could express it like this:

39^2
= (40 – 1)(40 – 1)
= 1600 – 40 – 40 + 1
= 1521

You can use the same approach when multiplying almost any double-digit numbers, not only squaring. For example 37 times 73:

(40 – 3)(70 + 3)
= 2800 + 120 – 210 – 9
= 2701

Conclusion

This ends the list of mental math tips and tricks you can utilize to make the Quant section a bit less laborious. Keep in mind that no strategy or shortcut would be able to compensate for the lack of proper prep so it all comes down not only to practicing but doing so the right way.

For more information regarding the GMAT Calculator, GMAT Calculator & Mental Math – All You Need To Know, is a very insightful article to read.

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At-Home GMAT Prep: A Handy Guide
Posted on
02
Sep 2021

At-Home GMAT Prep: A Handy Guide

Ready to take the next step in your academic career and select an MBA program that will open new doors for you? Well first, you need to take one of the most important exams of your life – the GMAT. This is not something you can take easily as it can potentially score you some scholarships that will help fund your education and it’s one of those things that employers will want to take a look at. That’s why people spend months preparing for the GMAT. That being said, Apex tutors suggest a prep time period of 90 to 120 days.

So, to make the process easier for you, we came up with a guide full of the best tips and tricks that will help you prepare for the GMAT at home, along with some common mistakes to avoid when prepping.

The 2 Main Benefits of At-Home GMAT Prep

It essentially comes down to you to work hard and follow some best practices. Here’s how at-home self-prep will help you succeed:

  • You’ll be able to study in a familiar place. That will make you more comfortable and having a designated GMAT prep space will keep you more focused on your progress.
  • This is a good opportunity for you to study at your own pace and at a schedule that best suits you and your needs. This is definitely a much more convenient alternative than any GMAT prep class that you can take to help you prep.

Top 5 Tips To Follow for a Successful At-Home GMAT Prep

Here are the top 5 best practices to follow when preparing for the GMAT at home:

Find a Good Location

What you want to do is have a designated space where you sit down every day and work on the GMAT. You’d want to pick a place where there are no distractions and where you’ll be able to get work done without being bothered. One thing to keep in mind is that you don’t want to get too comfortable as you actually want to get some work done and not just end up laying down and napping every time you decide to study for the GMAT.

Give Yourself Enough Time

Make sure to start early with your GMAT preparation as the more time you have to work on improving, the higher your chances of succeeding and getting a higher score. That’s why you’d want to give yourself a minimum of 3 months to prepare depending on your prior knowledge and the level of preparation that you’ll need to succeed.

Follow a Structured Schedule

As soon as you decide to start preparing for the GMAT, you’re going to have to come up with a personalized schedule that you have to follow until the exam day. Following a schedule where you have to practice a bit every day instead of cramming everything on the last week, will keep you more focused. It will also not overwork you and you’ll have just enough time to go through every section in detail and also some extra time to take some mock tests to practice your knowledge.

Practice, Practice, Practice!

You know what they say: practice makes perfect. Well, they’re not wrong! The more practice you get before taking the actual exam, the better, especially because mock tests help you point out the areas that you need to work harder on. Mock exams also help you get used to the exam’s format and scoring system so you won’t have trouble navigating the exam in the future.

To make things easier, here are a few alternatives where you can get practice tests and official materials to practice on:

Learn to Manage Your Time!

The test-takers’ #1 pitfall is not focusing on the time when preparing for the GMAT, being well-aware that GMAT is a timed exam. We suggest practicing without a time constraint at first, just so you can get used to the format and the concepts. After you get a better understanding of what to expect, you can start timing yourself. You’d want to practice with a timer in order to actually see how well you’d perform in the real GMAT exam. Time pressure is a real thing, and what you don’t want to do is show up and not be able to finish your test on time.

Top 3 Mistakes To Avoid When Preparing for the GMAT

Now that we went over some of the best tips, let’s talk about some common mistakes that students make that you definitely need to avoid:

Procrastinating

Deciding that you need to start prepping for the GMAT in advance is one thing, but what most people end up doing is doing a little bit in the beginning and then procrastinating until it’s too late to go back. You don’t want to cram everything in the last 2 weeks: that’s not time-efficient and it won’t help you master the exam. Instead, you’ll just get more stressed and overwhelmed. In other words, try to keep the same pace throughout the whole 3-4 month period of your at-home GMAT prep in order to get the score you’re aiming for.

Stressing Way Too Much On Exam Day

It’s normal to worry about your scores as this exam can very well determine your future. However, worrying way too much can affect your performance on exam day. Instead, take your time to prepare and do your best when the time comes for you to take the GMAT, and you’ll be just fine. One extra step that you can take to help you manage the stress is visiting the test center before the exam. That way, you’ll get used to the journey and the place and you’ll also feel more relaxed if you know what to expect.  

Studying Instead Of Practicing

Another mistake students make is studying study guides instead of practicing extensively. Study guides can help you so much, but practicing on real exams is what will essentially put all that textbook knowledge into practice. So make sure to spend most of your time on actual practice, rather than focusing on learning concepts by heart.

Pro tip: Another way to help you accelerate learning is by working with a one-on-one GMAT instructor. The help of an expert can be beneficial, especially when you find that you are not making any progress with your prep or if you find yourself falling victim to any of the at-home prep mistakes listed above. These instructors know their way around the exam and will bring some structure to your at-home GMAT prep as they work around your schedule and will keep you focused on what’s important.

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GMAT Prep Best Practices
Posted on
26
Aug 2021

How Top Scorers Study for The GMAT

By: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Narek Petrosyan
Date: 26 August 2021

GMAT Prep Best Practices 

Whether you are still preparing to take your first GMAT exam or aiming to get a higher score than on your previous one, you need a certain routine or a study plan and a determination to invest your full capacity into diligent and dedicated hard work. The top MBA programs usually require a GMAT score of 650 or above. Spending your time and energy inefficiently or not investing in proper preparation, may significantly, if not completely, reduce the chances of pursuing your MBA aspirations. In this article, we will explore some of the effective methods you can integrate into your prep to get a GMAT 650 score or above.

The Fundamentals

Firstly, let’s settle the most fundamental requirements that you need to make sure are inherently engraved into your approach. Those are unshakable dedication, efficient time management, wise prioritization, hard work, and diligence. While some of these can be considered common sense, in the long run, many students usually get distracted and forget about those. More commonly, the accumulated stress from the GMAT prep can shatter the pillars that these students have once so proudly built to hold the weight. 

Figure Out Your Learning Style and Find a Fitting Resource

After you’ve set your MBA goals and feel determined to start preparing for the GMAT, it’s now time to figure out your learning style and find a resource that fits. Nowadays, there are far more resources available than ever before. As such, it can be quite overwhelming to make a detailed choice. One of the first questions you need to ask yourself is what is your current or potential score? If you haven’t taken a GMAT test yet, maybe you should first find resources that start with the basics. Alternatively, if you’re aiming to get your current score to the top, you may also consider taking a one on one GMAT tutoring course. There are a myriad of companies that offer private GMAT tutoring services both online and in-person. ApexGMAT, for example, is more focused on increasing your current score to a 700+. Once you’ve set your current level you can then start working on that and find the best method for your preparation, given the abundance of resources available.

Manage Your Time Efficiently

Another, not less of an important aspect you should consider is time management. How much time can you dedicate to your prep daily? Many Top MBA schools prefer a 700+ GMAT score, which, in turn, requires a minimum of 100 hours of productive study in total. The word productive is essential here, as it is sometimes rather easy to mistake your activity for achievement. It’s not the matter of how many hours you can sit in front of your desk with an open book, but how much of it you can absorb, understand, and actually prepare for during that time. Too little time devoted will never be enough, while too much study can cause severe stress, and in fact, the next day you may not remember half of what you’ve learned. So, be realistic and honest with yourself, find that sweet daily time slot when you can prepare for the GMAT having enough energy and no external distractions, be consistent, strategic, and habitual, and, overall, manage your time efficiently during the day, prioritizing your studies.

Focus on Weak Areas and Improving Your Strengths

Start with a diagnostic test to figure out areas that need improvement first. It would be especially helpful if you’re just starting, as it may let you understand your weaknesses and strengths, and therefore what route you should take further. It will also give you a picture of how the actual exam will look like quite early in your preparation creed. After you’ve identified your weak points, it’s time to address those. If you seem weak, for example, in the quantitative section, then it’s a good indicator that you should put much more focus on that. That being said, you should not neglect the sections and types of problems that you do well on. One of the reasons the GMAT is challenging is its time pressure. The more you can nourish your strengths, the better you’ll be able to deal with the time pressure. Not only that, the GMAT test is adaptive, so the further you go with the streak, the harder the questions will get.

Get Plenty of Sleep and Try to Reduce Stress

Lack of sufficient and healthy sleep is probably the number one obstacle standing in most students’ way of effective GMAT preparations and, consequently, top GMAT performance. Your sleep hygiene plays a key role in allowing the brain to absorb what’s been learned during the day, as well as preparing it for the prep of the arriving day. As such, one of the best practices the top scorers integrate into their preparation is a good 8 hours of sleep every night. In turn, not only will this benefit your GMAT prep, but also your overall and mental health. Even if it will take you away from GMAT exam studies, it’s still worth it. You can learn more about how sleep helps you improve your GMAT prep time in this youtube video.

Start and Plan Early

As for the final tips, there are a few things you can do to eliminate a huge portion of stress from your test preparation studies and, in fact, significantly contribute to your preparations. Firstly, make sure you start as early as possible. Just as soon as you decide on your MBA goals, if possible, start figuring out your study plan immediately. Even if it may seem that there’s no need to rush just yet, in the long run, it will prove worthy and will increasingly boost your confidence before your exam day. Secondly, plan on the date early. Test centers may just have very limited spaces, and if you won’t be able to reserve your desired date, it may become a heavy burden. And lastly, make sure you don’t overwhelm yourself the day before your GMAT exam. Grant yourself a good resting day in a calm, positive, and stressless environment.

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GMAT score use in employment
Posted on
05
Aug 2021

Why is your GMAT Score Important for Prospective Jobs?

By: Apex GMAT
Date: 5th August 2021

Taking the GMAT and getting a 700+ score is not only going to help you pursue your MBA career, it will also facilitate additional professional benefits. Indeed, the GMAT requires far more skills than just the math or verbal skills that are tested, and success can be evidence of an array of capabilities. Read on to find out what GMAT score use in employment is and why more employers are taking candidates’ GMAT scores into account in hiring decisions.

Of course, a high GMAT score primarily makes one stand out from other job applicants. Moreover, it is also a clear and objective indicator of your integrated reasoning abilities, as well as your analytical, verbal, and quantitative reasoning skills. Particularly for those interested in applying for finance, investment, or business-related employment, an excellent GMAT score can be proof of expertise in the aforementioned categories. 

At the surface level, a high score in the quant section demonstrates that a candidate can solve and interpret numerical problems. More significantly, it also implies that the applicant can be trusted with complex calculations, extensive financial reports, and other major related tasks. Furthermore, a candidate’s integrated reasoning skills will be seen to be of great professional value, especially when working with a large amount of data from multiple sources. Extrapolating the right takeaways and decision-making points from this wide array of data is a skill highly sought after by employers.  

The GMAT’s testing of analytical writing and verbal reasoning skills have implications for a candidate’s professional capabilities. Scores in these sections speak to the applicant’s capacity for critical thinking as well as how clearly and precisely they can express their ideas in written form.

Ultimately, the GMAT score helps employers select their hires based on information gleaned from standardized testing, and not just personal characteristics or experience. This allows for a selection process that is much more comprehensive. 

Since the GMAT is a requirement for MBA admission, a high score also indicates that the candidate has been admitted to a prestigious and academically rigorous university. Potential employers perceive such individuals as having a high-quality education from top-notch professors. Many of whom have worked in their industry. 

Finally, a candidate with a high GMAT score is also better placed to perform well during a job interview than someone who has never prepared for such a test. By putting his/her critical thinking and verbal reasoning skills into practice, a job candidate with a 700+ score is more likely to excel at answering questions that require the application of analytical and logical skills. Moreover, having taken the GMAT, prospective hires enjoy minimal interview anxiety or stress, because they were trained to manage such issues while preparing for the test. Additionally, they may be exempt from taking company interview tasks due to their performance on the GMAT. 

For all these reasons, employers will always value individuals with high GMAT scores, giving them preference over the job seekers with low or no GMAT scores. For more information regarding the GMAT Scoring, GMAT Scoring Demystified is a very insightful article to read.  

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How To Keep Your Sanity While Preparing For The GMAT
Posted on
03
Aug 2021

How To Keep Your Sanity While Preparing For The GMAT

By: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Nemrout Safarian
Date: 3rd August, 2021

The Hows:
– Taking a GMAT Preparation Course
– Creating an Effective Study Schedule
– Controlling Your Emotions
– Maintaining Connection to Your Support Team
– Resting and Getting Good Sleep
– Celebrating Your Big and Little Achievements

 

Experiencing too much anxiety over the GMAT Exam might cause a negative impact on your mental health and make it difficult for you to keep your sanity. Moreover, it might even make it more challenging to concentrate when studying and disrupt your sleep schedule. However, with the correct test stress and anxiety busting tactics, as well as an effective studying schedule, your GMAT exam preparation can become much less stressful.

Here are 6 tips that we recommend to make your GMAT exam preparation stress-free and effective.

  • Take a GMAT Preparation Course

Everyone’s GMAT story is different. Some people can get a 700 score based on everything they already know, without opening a GMAT book. But, for most students, a preparation course or one on one prep time with a personal GMAT  tutor is necessary for two reasons. First: it puts you in the right direction in terms of exam content, strategies, solution paths, and tactics to tackle problems, by helping you structure a concrete and designated studying plan.

Secondly: it makes you feel much more confident and emotionally calm, as you work with a trustworthy and an experienced professional who knows the ins and outs of the exam and preparation insights. Furthermore, a GMAT tutor can assist you with anything necessary throughout the preparation and testing process. Apex GMAT, for example, offers a complimentary consultation call for interested individuals, looking for structured personalized GMAT preparation. 

 

  • Create an Effective Study Schedule

Don’t wait for the perfect time to take the GMAT. This moment may never reveal itself! Life will always throw you curveballs and can end up curtailing your plans. Situations may arise which may interfere with your GMAT preparation as well. During your GMAT prep, you should take the extra effort to harmonize any unexpected situations with your study schedule.

One effective method you could try is to divide your studying schedule into multiple time frames throughout the day so that you can concentrate on preparing in smaller doses rather than studying for 5-7 hours straight and losing your ever so vital focus.

Study the materials during the weekdays and devote some time to practice tests where necessary. Practice test will help you to assess your progress and to understand your main strengths and weaknesses. Beware: don’t overuse practice tests. 

  • Control Your Emotions

At some point, the GMAT will stress you out, making you feel disappointed and frustrated. This is natural! Whether it is an unsatisfactory score on a practice test or the feeling of giving up, the GMAT can make it easy to have an emotional breakdown. However, it is important to be able to take control of your emotions, and have a “never a failure, always a lesson” attitude.

Every time you make a mistake, try to dive deep into that specific concept and figure out why you made that particular mistake. And learn from it. This is exactly how you make progress! Whenever you feel like you can’t go on anymore, remember your goals and aspirations, and that this test is a key to the completion of those. Also keep in mind that taking a break is a good thing, practicing in short timeframes will allow you to improve your skills without feeling overwhelmed.  With the proper frame of mind, you will find yourself studying again in no time.

  • Maintain a Connection to Your Support Team

The people you communicate with during your GMAT preparation process are very important and can hugely affect your frame of mind. Try not to isolate yourself too much from them. Spending your whole time in your room focusing on all that GMAT content can lead to burnouts.

Instead, spend time with the people whose presence is pleasing to you, who support and believe in you. This can be your family, your best friends, or the new acquaintance that has no idea what the GMAT even is. Constant communication with the people that you love will positively affect your overall mentality and help you stay engaged and happy when preparing for the test.

  • Get Some Rest and Good Sleep

Another essential thing to remember is paying attention to your sleep schedule. Add an extra half an hour to your sleep schedule so that you can give your brain time to wind down for the night. This extra half-hour is crucial, as we frequently overlook the time it takes to get ready for bed, set the alarm clock, and so on. Getting 8 hours of sleep a night while preparing for the GMAT is vital. 

Additionally, be cautious about what you are eating or drinking as an unhealthy diet can negatively affect your sleep schedule. Although the effects of caffeine may differ from person to person, try to avoid all sources of caffeine after 3 p.m. and modify accordingly. Aside from coffee, caffeine is found in a variety of foods and drinks, including tea, chocolate, and carbonated beverages. However, there are GMAT test prep benefits to caffeine products when consumed thoughtfully. 

  • Celebrate Your Big and Little Achievements

Your GMAT preparation process aims to help you reach your goals! Reward yourself a little – take a moment and celebrate little achievements. Whether it is progress in practice test scores or a complicated Math concept that you have finally mastered. It will help you feel more positive and confident about your overall knowledge and skills.

Be brave enough to challenge yourself with tougher concepts after. As you progress down your GMAT journey, be sure to celebrate  your short- and long-term accomplishments. These moments of celebration will undoubtedly assist you in keeping yourself at the top of your game and stress free.

Good luck studying and remember to believe in yourself! 

 

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GMAT Calculator & Mental Math - All You Need To Know
Posted on
27
Jul 2021

GMAT Calculator & Mental Math – All You Need To Know

Author: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Ilia Dobrev
Date: 27 July, 2021

Are you allowed to use a calculator on the GMAT? While this may seem as a pretty straightforward question to answer, it does deserve a separate blog post as it hides details that are vital for achieving a top GMAT score not only on the quantitative section, but on the exam as a whole.

Well, the answer is both Yes and No. This article aims to examine the different scenarios where you are allowed to use such a device and how you can make full use of its potential. But, if you are used to doing math with a calculator, do not worry as we have compiled a list of some mental math techniques that you can use to your advantage and even save much important time while still being spot-on with your answers.

Calculator on the GMAT | Explained

  • You are not allowed to bring your own calculator to the GMAT exam.
    According to the GMAC, no personal items are allowed in the exam room of any of the certified test centers.
  • You cannot use a calculator on the Quantitative section of the GMAT.
    Despite the fact that we are so used to using calculators to help us with arithmetic operations, you should not feel intimidated that you are not allowed to use any type of calculator on the GMAT Quantitative section. However, you will be provided with a blank canvas by the proctor of the exam where you will have plenty of space to practice to manually compute any calculations, if needed.

You should not worry as the GMAT exam is not designed to test you on complicated mathematical operations or complex calculations. Instead, the quant section draws from secondary-level math skills like basic algebra and geometry, which are mastered in high school, to test other kinds of abilities like critical thinking, logical reasoning, and problem-solving. In fact, the majority of the Quant questions can (and should) be answered without any calculations beyond estimation. A typical example of how you can use mental math to get to the right answer while saving precious time on the GMAT is the Movie Night combinatorics problem. Another type of common GMAT quant questions are data sufficiency problems, which are also more about reasoning than  calculations. You’ll only need to do basic calculations and can rely on estimation for anything more complicated. If you have to do the math, the GMAC usually keeps the numbers simple and avoids decimals. When you see large numbers or complex fractions, then it’s a good bet that there’s an easier solution path to embark on other than calculating.

Surprisingly or not, a calculator will be provided for use during the GMAT Integrated Reasoning section of the test. This GMAT calculator has the standard basic functions, CE (clear entry) button, C (clear) button, an sqrt function, a % (percentage) button, and a 1/x button that calculates the reciprocal of the entry currently on the screen. Also, there is a row with the standard memory functions

  • MS (memory store) stores the current entry in the calculator’s memory for subsequent use.
  • MR (memory recall) displays the latest number stored in the calculator’s memory so that it can be used for the next calculations.
  • M+ (memory addition) adds the current entry to the value that is currently stored in the calculator’s memory. This button is helpful when you need to add a long series of numbers and don’t want to retype each one.
  • MC (memory clear) erases whatever is in the current memory. You should click this button before every new calculation scenario.

Improve your Mental Math and reduce your Calculator Dependency

Survival Tips & Tricks

Do not overuse the IR calculator.

While you are provided with a basic GMAT calculator during the Integrated Reasoning section, you might not want to use it too often as you’ll waste more time than you’ll save. You can also apply the solution paths you are using in the Quant section to some problems in the Integrated Reasoning section.

Constantly practice Mental Math operations.

A huge morale boost is that mental math operations are easy to learn with some practice. You can add, multiply, subtract, and divide when you pay bills, check out at the grocery store, calculate a tip, etc. without using a calculator.

Make accurate estimations

The key to saving a considerable amount of time on the GMAT exam is efficiency in estimations. Transform numbers to less unwieldy figures like 0 or 5 for the purpose of calculations. You can then browse the answer choices to see which is closest to your preliminary estimate.

Do not use a calculator when you are prepping for the GMAT quant section.

This is a great way to practice mental math operations outside the daily life operations. The test setting and quant context will let you get used to this environment so that you know what to expect on test day.

Familiarize yourself with a basic GMAT calculator and do use its Memory functions.

As this will be your only technical aid during the GMAT Integrated Reasoning section, you’d better spend some time making the most out of it. Especially when you are pressed by time, memorizing calculated values for further operations in the calculator’s memory can be crucial for staying on track with a healthy exam pace.

Guide yourself by looking at the answer choices.

Looking at the answer choices can immediately permit you to eliminate a couple of options. Even if you are pushed by time, you can easily make a more educated decision depending on your reasoning that will boost the chances of picking the correct answer.

Do not freak out if you see large numbers.

Remember that the people who stand behind the GMAT are aware that they are designing questions that are supposed to be answered without using a calculator. This also keeps the arithmetic from being too difficult and gives you the opportunity to apply a more straightforward approach.

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