EA Score
Posted on
18
May 2022

EA Score: How Is The Executive Assessment Scored?

You have already taken, or are planning on taking your Executive Assessment (EA), but you do not quite understand how your EA score will be calculated or assessed. Knowing how your exam will be evaluated and corrected can help you in dividing your time during your exam more efficiently and can also help in the way you plan to approach the exam. You most likely have quite the number of questions that you would like to get the answers to. Well, in this article, we will be breaking down the EA’s scoring method.

What will be discussed is the following; 

  • The EA exam
  • The EA scores
  • The EA score calculation
  • The EA percentiles
  • A list of some of the B-Schools accepting EA scores

1. Back to the Basics

Back in March 2016, the Executive Assessment was announced by GMAC, the creators of the official GMAT exam. The EA was designed to serve professionals who aim to enroll in Executive MBA programs. The test was built to be finished in only 90 minutes, and unlike the GMAT, requires little to no prepping. 

The EA is an assessment to evaluate a candidate’s readiness. That means that the score received is not a tool used to compare all the applicants, rather it is used to see if the candidates are capable of handling the programs they applied for.

If you are a busy professional looking for a way to showcase your EMBA readiness to the admission officers without the stress of preparing for the GMAT, then the EA is just the exam for you.

The EA is divided into three different sections, which are, Integrated Reasoning, Verbal Reasoning, and Quantitative Reasoning

Each of its sections aims to test different skills hidden in its takers. But to get the bigger picture, the whole exam is there to measure skills that are needed in a fulfilling career, as well as, in the Business Programs. These skills include critical thinking, the ability of deep analysis, problem solving, and higher order reasoning. 

There are a total of 40 questions to finish in exactly 90 minutes, as mentioned prior in this article. For a more detailed distribution about that matter, take a look at this table below:

Sections Number of Questions Timing
Integrated Reasoning 12 30 minutes
Verbal Reasoning 14 30 minutes
Quantitative Reasoning  14 30 minutes

2. EA Score

Starting with the picture as a whole, the Executive Assessment has a total score ranging from 100 to 200, with a minimum score of 126, and a maximum of 174, leaving a score of 150 as the midpoint score. 

The three sections making up the EA exam all have equal distribution when it comes to their scoring. The three sections’ scores range on a scale of 0 to 20. 

Something great about the EA is that there is no “passing” or “good” EA score, what matters is your score and all the other factors in your application that make the admission’s decision. But, of course, the higher your total EA score, the better – especially if you are considering a competitive EMBA program

However, for most EMBA programs, their consideration of a “good’’ or “ideal” score would be one equal to 150 (the midpoint score) or above.

3. EA Score Calculation

Your total EA score is the summation of the scores you got on all three different sections, plus 120. Let’s suppose you scored 15 on each section, your score would be: 15 + 15 + 15 + 120 = 165. So, that is the scores of all the three different sections on your EA plus 120. If that was really the case, then you would have scored within the 98th percentile. 

4. EA Percentiles 

Speaking of percentiles, here is all you need to know when it comes to this subject. Percentiles are like rankings that identify where you stand in comparison to the other EA test takers. The higher your total score, the higher the percentile rate, and vice versa. 

Taking the example from above, if you scored 165 in total, that means you are in the 98th percentile. That also means that you were from the rare 2% of all the test takers that scored that specific score and that 98% of the test takers scored lower than your score. 

Here are the Officially published Executive Assessment Percentiles 2021:

    • 0th Percentile: 126 (the lowest score)
    • 10th Percentile: 141 
    • 25th Percentile: 146
  • 40th Percentile: 148
    • 50th Percentile: 150 (the midpoint score) 
    • 75th Percentile: 153
  • 86th Percentile: 156
  • 99th Percentile: 174 (the highest score) 

5. A List of Some of the Schools Accepting EA Scoring

Schools in America: 

Schools in Europe: 

Schools in Asia:

Moral of the Story

To make a long story short, the EA is known to be the perfect exam for busy professionals that do not have the time needed for all the hassle that comes along with the GMAT prep journey. It is an identification of your readiness and your ability to handle the program you applied to. 

If you are looking for professional help to boost your EA performance, head to our official website and book your 30 minutes complimentary assessment session now!

Contributor: Lilas AL-Sammak

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EA Exam 2022
Posted on
04
May 2022

EA Exam 2022 – Everything You Need To Know In 5 Minutes

Table of Contents

  • About the EA Exam
    • What is EA used for?
  • EA Structure, Sections, Timing, & Scoring
    • EA Scoring & Validity
    • What is a Good Score?
  • How, When, & Where can I take the EA? 
    • EA Exam Day FAQs
  • How Much Does The EA Exam Cost?
    • Rescheduling & Cancellation of your EA appointment
    • Additional Costs Worth Considering 
  • EA History & Background
    • EA Changes Over Years
    • Online EA Test in the face of COVID-19

About The EA Exam

The Executive Assessment (EA) is considered a trusted predictor of business school readiness for busy professionals wishing to earn an MBA or EMBA. The exam is crafted and administered by the General Management Admissions Council (GMAC) to measure a candidate’s higher order reasoning, critical thinking, analysis, and problem solving skills. You can also register for the EA through their official portal or browse through some EA prep sources here and find free EA prep questions here

The EA test is a multiple-choice, computer adaptive test (CAT) – this means that an algorithm selects each following question based on the test taker’s ability level and performance on previous questions. If you are new to this concept, the most important feature to understand is that, when you answer a question correctly, the following question will be even more challenging. Conversely, if you answer a question incorrectly, it will give you an easier one next.

What Is The EA Exam Used For?

The Executive Assessment is primarily used for admissions to nearly 100 institutions, universities, and MBA and EMBA programs worldwide which offer business and management disciplines. Keep in mind that many business schools screen applicants based on a range of criteria, but EA scores are among the most important screening metrics used. Others include undergraduate GPA, work and other relevant experience, application essays, recommendation letters, and personal interviews.

Strong EA results are necessary, but certainly not sufficient to gain admission to the best MBA/EMBA and business-oriented grad schools programs like Masters of Finance (MFin), Masters of Accounting (MAcct), Masters of Business Administration (MBA), Juris Doctor & Masters of Business Administration (JD-MBA) and PhDs in all these disciplines. Remember,  that while the EA is important, it’s certainly not a measure of who you are as a person and is one part of a many-faceted application. 

An investment of time and resources into the right EA preparation program or plan will result in a higher score on the test, which has a direct correlation with your admissions success and will have a positive impact on your business school experience and future professional career.

EA Structure, Sections, Timing, & Scoring

The EA test consists of three sections with categorized problems aiming to assess a different skill set. Each part differs in terms of score range and the number and types of problems:

1. Integrated Reasoning (IR) 12 questions | 30 minutes | scored from 0 to 20
There are four types of questions on the Integrated Reasoning section: 

      • Multi-source reasoning
      • Graphic interpretation 
      • Two-part analysis 
      • Table analysis

2. Quantitative 14 questions | 30 minutes | scored from 0 to 20
There are two types of problems on the Quantitative section: 

      • Data sufficiency   
      • Problem solving

3. Verbal 14 questions | 30 minutes | scored from 0 to 20
There are three types of questions on the Verbal section:

      • Reading comprehension
      • Critical reasoning 
      • Sentence correction

There are several other factors worth mentioning:

  • The Executive Assessment is meant for busy professionals. Many of whom have already been working professionally for around 7 years. 
  • The total score of the EA ranges from 100 to 200 
  • Despite the official scoring guides, the maximum you can score on EA is 174 and the minimum being 126.
  • The total time to take the EA test is 90 minutes.
  • As the total time of the EA is 90 minutes, test takers are not given any breaks. 
  • All three sections are weighted equally towards your overall score. 

EA Scoring & Validity

You’ll get your unofficial score when you complete your exam. You and your designated schools will receive your official EA score within 24 hours of the exam, and it will be valid for the following five years. In order to determine what score will be good for you, you should consider both the average (mean) EA score and the range of scores of applicants admitted to your desired university.

If you find yourself lost in the translation of the EA scores into percentiles, this article explains it in a meticulous way. 

What is a Good EA Score?

What is a good Executive Assessment score, and how can I get one? We are frequently asked this question, but the answer varies depending on who we speak with. Here at Apex, we want to help our clients obtain their goal EA scores because this is where they can truly compete for top programs and be eligible for MBA and EMBA scholarships. However a “good EA score” is determined by the applicant’s MBA program’s requirements; some programs demand a score above 150, while others require a score above 155. Selecting the programs you wish to attend and examining their MBA and EMBA class profile will supply you with this knowledge and equip you with a solid foundation from which to begin your EA preparation.

In case you are wondering what a 155 EA score can do for you, here is all you need to know!

How, When, & Where Can I Take The EA Exam?

How?

We recommend registering two to three months before your desired exam date. The scheduling can be done online (applicant needs to open an account) or through a phone call (applicant needs to call the EA Customer Service in their region). For more information visit gmac.com/executive-assessment.   

Where?

You can take the EA at one of 600+ test centers worldwide or online in the comfort of your own home. You can search for a testing location near you here. The test is administered on a computer, via a platform used worldwide: Pearson VUE. The EA is available only at designated Pearson VUE test centers, thus assuring each candidate the exact same experience as all other test takers around the world.

When?

You can take the EA test almost anytime you want, depending on the availability of dates into the test center(s) you have chosen. However, there are some requirements regarding re-taking the exam. You can retake the exam as soon as you’d like, however you may only take the exam up to two times. 

EA Exam Day FAQs

Here are the top 3 questions that clients ask us about exam day information:

1. What should I do if I fall sick on the exam day?

If you do not feel well come exam day you will have to make the decision as to whether or not you can take the test and perform at your best. Most people will not be able to do this, so it will be best to cancel. If you do so on the day of the exam, you will incur a loss of your full $350 exam fee. If you cancel the exam up to 24 hours in advance you will receive only a $250 refund. However, rescheduling the exam between 24-48 hours will only incur a fee of $75 while rescheduling the appointment more than 48 hours out does not incur a fee. 

2. What can I bring with me to the test center?

You are allowed in the test center with the following:

    • EA approved identification
    • Appointment confirmation letter or email you received from Pearson VUE
    • Prescription eyeglasses
    • Light sweater or light non-outerwear jacket
    • Comfort items only if they were pre-approved as an accommodation received in advance

Any additional personal belongings that you bring with you such as your cell phone, bag, snacks, and earphones will need to be stored in one of the provided lockers. Any cell phone use throughout the test time is prohibited.
The test center will provide you with everything that you need in order to take the test including scratch paper and a pencil.

3. What can I expect at the test center?

A usual test center is typically quite small. Once you arrive you will have to provide the administrator with the relevant documents and while these are being processed you will be asked to wait in the waiting area. In this area, you can still access all your personal belongings up until you are called into the testing room.

Once in the room, you will be allocated an individual exam station where you will find a computer.

Here is the full list of the EA Exam Day FAQs

4. How Much Does The EA Test Cost?

The cost to sit the EA exam is $350. This includes sending your results to up to five schools of your choice. There are no fees for sending your scores to any additional school. 

Rescheduling & Cancellation of your EA appointment
Regular Rescheduling fees:

  • No Fee if requested more than 48 hours prior to appointment
  • $75 if requested 24 to 48 hours prior to appointment (Temporarily waived)
  • $10 to reschedule the assessment by phone 
  • Regular Cancellation fees:
  • $100 to cancel up to 24 hours before the appointment
  • $10 to cancel the assessment by phone. 

Additional Costs Worth Considering
Apart from the test fee, there are other costs that you may want to consider. GMAC advises people preparing for the exam to utilize the EA Official Guide (as do we) alongside other learning aids as additional materials. Please note that the Official Guide is a great resource for problems, but the explanations leave something to be desired, so using only the Official Guide is not recommended.

A large percentage of test takers who wish to score in the 90th percentile or higher (157+) on the EA invest in private EA preparation as a personalized means to achieving long-term career success. Our firm, Apex , specializes in offering private, customized EA preparation and admissions consulting. We focus on individual learning and a holistic coaching environment where we tackle not only the fundamentals but the underlying structure and complexity of the EA.

We do this not just to get you a good score, but to prepare you for your MBA/EMBA program and career beyond by focusing on universal critical thinking skills, cognitive heuristics, emotional and behavioral aspects of learning and high stakes performance, and other learning techniques that can be applied widely over the course of a lifetime. We take pride in exactly this personalized approach as a means for every candidate to utilize their strengths better, focus on their weaknesses, and overcome test anxiety through an exclusively designed EA curriculum.

A lot of people try to save money on the EA preparation process. When you consider that a top EMBA can lead to millions of dollars of extra earnings over the course of a lifetime, it makes sense to invest in EA preparation. Learn more about this subject with our instructors Mike and Jaymes, here: Why is Test Prep so Expensive?

EA History & Background

In March of 2016, the Executive Assessment made its debut in the standardized test world. It was a novel test designed for working professionals who wished to undertake an EMBA. The creators of the EA, the GMAC, wished to create an exam which tested the real-world skills working professionals have gained throughout their careers. 

As the EA is a newish test on the testing market, it is only accepted at a handful of schools. This list, however, is constantly expanding. Because of this, be sure to double check the official EA site to keep up-to-date on which schools accept the EA. 

Online EA Test

The Executive Assessment is available online. However, it is encouraged by the GMAC that those who feel safe to do so, take the EA at a test center.
In terms of content, the EA online has the same structure and content as the test taken at a test center.
Registering for the EA online is the same process as registering to take the exam in person. Just be sure to select the ‘online’ (at home) option when selecting your test location. 
Interested test takers are able to take the EA at any home location so long as they have the necessary technology to do so. However, test takers in Mainland China, Cuba, Iran, North Korea, Sudan, and South Sudan are not able to take the EA online.

 

That’s it! Thanks for sticking with us to the end of this EA test crash course! If you are looking for a more comprehensive version diving deeper into what the EA has in store for you, feel free to check out our website for more information

 

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EA Integrated Reasoning Section - All You Need To Know
Posted on
20
Apr 2022

EA Integrated Reasoning Section – All You Need To Know

The Executive Assessment exam is considered to be a relatively short exam for admission to an EMBA program, but it manages to cover a wide range of topics. That being said, knowing the structure of the exam, as well as what to expect on the test day is a huge part of your EA prep.

The Integrated Reasoning is one of the three sections on the EA exam and it is scored from 0 to 18. It requires a complex preparation that will help you develop verbal and quantitative skills, the ability to read charts and graphs, and actually get insights from those charts. In this article, we are going to share with you everything you need to know about the EA Integrated Reasoning section – from what this section consists of to some important aspects of the preparation that you need to consider.

1. What is the Structure of the EA Integrated Reasoning Section?

The EA Integrated Reasoning section is divided into 4 categories – Graphics Interpretation, Table Analysis, Two-Part Analysis, and Multi-Source Reasoning. Each of the categories contains 12 questions. A test-taker has 30 minutes to answer the 12 questions or about 2.5 minutes per question. The 12 questions are divided into two modules of 6 questions each. Depending on the test-taker’s performance in the first module of questions, the difficulty of the questions in the second module varies. The more complex questions you answer in the first module, the more complex you will get in the second module, and eventually, you can get a higher score.

2. What is the Scoring on the EA Integrated Reasoning Section?

All three sections on the EA exam are scored in the same way. The official score on each section is ranged between 0 and 20. The score from each section has the same weight in the EA total score and the final grade.

3. What are the different types of questions? 

There are the four types of Integrated Reasoning questions included in the EA exam:

  • Two-part Analysis

The questions in this category ask you to select two answers from a set of choices presented in a table. The two answers have to be related to each other somehow, so you need to look for some analogy or connection between them. The questions will be quantitative or verbal, a.k.a. based on a mathematical problem or a scenario. Although the questions in this part may seem relatively easy to test-takers, they can be tricky. Sometimes, in these types of problems, you may have very little information to find the relationship between the two answers.  In such cases, you will need to select the only options available that fit that relationship, which may be rather challenging.

Example:

Consider the sets S, T and U, where

S = {35, 14, 64, 23, 49, 67}
T = {x, 35, 14, 64, 23, 49, 67} and
U = {y, 35, 14, 64, 23, 49, 67}

The mean of T is 5 less than the mean of S. The median of U is 9 less than the median of S.

Select the value of x and the value of y consistent with the statements given. Make two selections, one in each column.Two-Part Analysis

 

  • Graphics Interpretation

The questions in this category ask you to work with some information presented in a graph, chart, or some other form of data-visualization (i.e. bar-graph, stacked-bar graph, x-y scatter plot, etc.). You have to analyze the information and select the right answers based on it. The question addresses math concepts such as statistics, correlation, ratios, etc. In this part, it is important to learn how these concepts look graphically and get used to reading the graphs or charts.

Example:

Graphic Interpretation

Refer to the pictograph of a survey of attendees at the annual meeting of an international hotels group. Each symbol represents 13 companies in a sample of 390. Use the drop-down menus to complete each statement according to the information presented in the diagram. If one company is selected at random from the 390 surveyed, the chance that the company will be located in only one nation or headquartered outside of Europe or both is _____

A: 1 out of 6
B: 1 out of 3
C: 2 out of 3
D: 5 out of 6

If one company is selected at random from the 390 surveyed, the chance that the company will be both located in a single country and headquartered outside of Europe is _____

A: 1 out of 6
B: 1 out of 3
C: 2 out of 3
D: 5 out of 6

 

  • Table Analysis

The questions in this category present data in the form of a table and require you to answer Yes/No or True/False questions about the data in the table. You can sort the columns of the table in different ways to make their reading and understanding easier. That is why being able to sort functions effectively could be an essential skill you need to answer the Table Analysis questions. The first step to the solution of each problem is exactly to decide which “sort” function you are going to use. In terms of the topics, one can expect them to be somehow similar to those covered in the Graphics Interpretation category.

Example: 

For each of the following statements, select Yes if the statement is true based solely on the information in the table; otherwise select No.

Table Analysis Part 1

The table shows circulation data, by non-fiction classification, for books in a certain library system in November 2003. Percentages are given to the nearest 0.1 percent.

Table Analysis Part 2

 

  • Multi-Source Reasoning

The questions in this category present some information in the form of multiple texts as each text will be based on a single subject. You need to answer questions that are based on that specific text. You have to work with multiple texts which will include some sort of data. Being able to understand this data will be very helpful to you because you can go ahead and use the insights from that data to answer the questions. As you might have guessed, this category requires you to mix quantitative, verbal, and data-interpretation skills. You have to try to look beyond the most obvious tab and seek information that could be hidden somewhere in the paragraph.

Example:

Definition of musician: Any person who uses a device created to produce sound through blowing air, vibrating a string, striking a surface, or electronic means, or uses parts of their own body, with the intent of creating sound for the purpose of entertainment, communication, self-improvement, education, or production of an emotional response. This definition of musician fails to capture the standard concept of a musician in that it allows for the inclusion of some things that are not ordinarily thought of as musicians, for example, people who _____,

A: play many instruments
B: perform their music as a paid profession
C: turn on a stereo for their own enjoyment
D: write music for the purpose of others performing it
E: work as piano movers
F: teach the history of music

and excludes some things that are ordinarily thought of as musicians, for example, people who _____.

A: play many instruments
B: perform their music as a paid profession
C: turn on a stereo for their own enjoyment
D: write music for the purpose of others performing it
E: work as piano movers
F: teach the history of music

Conclusion

Understanding the structure, scoring, and different types of questions of the EA Integrated Reasoning section will help you to prepare better for the section as you will know what to expect and work on. It is important to develop a strategy on how to tackle the complex and multi-layered problems included in this section. You need to work on your ability to read and analyze graphs and charts, find and evaluate relationships in data, synthesize information from various texts, etc. We know that this may be a challenging task! At Apex we are more than happy to support you on your EA journey and assist you in every step of the process. You can sign-up for a 30-minute complimentary consultation call with one of our instructors who can help you ace any section on your EA exam!

 

Contributor: Diana Materova

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EA Exam Day FAQs
Posted on
06
Apr 2022

EA Exam Day FAQs – Answered!

Here are some of the most frequently asked EA exam day questions we get from our clients. Our EA FAQs are here to help you prepare for your EA exam day. 

1. When should I arrive at the test center on the test day? 

Short answer: about 30 minutes prior to the exam. This gives you plenty of time to get lost (however we recommend practice getting to the exam center before test day). Please note that if you’re 15 minutes late from the start of the exam, the administrators might not let you in. Be on time!

2. What documents should I bring to the test center?

You should bring your original valid ID which contains your name, your date of birth, a recent photograph, and your signature (a passport, a national ID card, Military ID card, Registration card, or a driving license). You will not be allowed to take the EA if you don’t present that document. Note that these documents are subject to change depending on the country in which you reside. You can take a look here to get more info on country-specific requirements. 

3. What am I allowed to bring into the exam room?

You are not allowed to bring personal items such as phones, tablets, smartwatches, etc. A locker will be provided to you where you can store your belongings. The same rules apply during the online EA, the belongings should not be in your reach, or else your exam will be canceled.  

4. Am I allowed to bring a calculator to the EA?

Yes and No. A calculator is allowed during the Integrated Reasoning Section, but you cannot use it during the Quantitative section.

5. Is there a dress code that I should follow for the EA?

There is no official dress code on the EA test day. However, we recommend wearing comfortable clothes and bringing an extra layer in case the test room is cold.

6. What do I do if my computer stops working while taking the EA?

If you are taking the EA on-ground, don’t try to fix the problem by yourself. The best thing to do in this case is to raise your hand and ask the proctor for help

In case you are sitting for the exam online, inform the proctor about the problem and they will attempt to help you. If the issue can’t be solved, your exam will end. You will be able to register for the exam again at no additional cost. 

7. What is the best way to handle disruptions while taking the EA?

Any disruptive situations during on-ground or online EA exams will be examined on a case-to-case basis. After the decision is made, you might be allowed to resit for the exam at another time without additional charge.

However, be ready for minor disruptions during the exam, such as coughing, fidgeting noises, sneezing, etc. To make sure these noises don’t distract you during the exam, we recommend you spend time doing practice exams in an uncontrolled environment, such as a coffee shop. Studying or practicing in public can help you get used to disruptions that you might face during the exam.

8. Will I be given something to write on during the EA exam?

You will be provided with pens and scratch paper by the test administrators once you are seated. If you are taking the online EA there is an on-screen scratchpad and recently introduced a pre-approved scratch paper option.

9. Do we get breaks during the EA exam?

The EA does NOT have any breaks. In case of an emergency, you can raise your hand and the administrator will help you. Note that the timer does not stop during your emergency. 

10. How many times can I take the EA exam?

You can take the EA exam up to 2 times.

11. How do I send my EA scores to the schools I am applying to?

If you need to send your EA score to a school, you can do so by requesting a score report through the online application system. You will need to provide the name and contact information of the school you are sending your scores to, and the chosen schools will have access to your results. 

In case you want to send the scores to additional programs, you can do so through your account online without any additional cost. 

Final Thoughts

This brief EA FAQ sheet should have answered some of your more pressing questions. Do you still have questions about the EA? We offer extensive EA prep to help with all levels of test-takers. Have a complimentary consultation call with one of our top instructors. You can check out more on our website.

 

Contributor: Sarin Sulahian & Cynthia Addoumieh

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EMBA Programs - Everything You Need To Know
Posted on
31
Mar 2022

EMBA Programs – Everything You Need To Know

The Executive Masters of Business Administration (EMBA) is a version of the MBA that is designed specifically for executives, managers, and high-ranking, highly-experienced business professionals. It is a short experience, usually done part-time, and is specifically designed for those who are working and do not have time to dedicate solely to studying. It is a highly desirable program usually used to help advance an executive’s career, help them as leaders, or even help them transition into other fields.

1. What is the EMBA?

EMBA was first introduced in 1943 at the University of Chicago, 35 years after the first MBA programs. In the midst of World War II, this was a step that helped bolster and further American business. Designed for educating managers with significant work experience, the earliest students were usually in their 40s or 50s with many years of business experience but very little formal business education. Today there are over 300 EMBA programs all across the globe. 

2. Differences From the MBA

The purpose of the EMBA was to further education to those who were either leaders in their companies or those who wanted to climb up the ladder. The average EMBA candidate has about 10 to 15 years of experience, while an MBA candidate has 3 to 5 years. EMBA programs are generally pursued part-time, while an MBA is more often a full-time undertaking. MBAs offer more traditional and immersive student experiences, while EMBAs consist of intensive short-term classes that business professionals who have little to no time can fit into their schedules. Some EMBA programs accept GMAT scores for admission, but for the most part, the GMAT is used for MBA programs. The EA (Executive Assessment) is a specialized version of the GMAT designed specifically for EMBA programs. 

The EA is a short version of the GMAT designed to be a quicker much shorter version of the exam. It is designed for the busy executives who go into EMBA programs and are short of time. Its sections are shorter both in the number of questions and in the time limits. It also lacks an analytical writing assessment (AWA) section.

3. EMBA Courses 

An EMBA course load is broken up into core classes and electives. Core classes usually focus on developing leadership, management, and business skills. They can cover fields like accounting, economics, and business ethics. In comparison, elective courses are in line with one’s own interests. Topics like entrepreneurship and asset management can be covered in these elective courses. The EMBA courses are a fantastic way to gain more in-depth knowledge or remind yourself of your fields of interest. 

4. Different Types of EMBA Programs

There are three types of EMBA programs – a traditional EMBA, an Online EMBA, and a Specialist EMBA. 

  • Traditional EMBA: This is a part-time program in which courses are offered in the evenings or on the weekend, or will have very intensive short-term course periods (about two weeks). Class sizes are usually small and can have a hybrid online and in-person approach. These classes focus on building communication and management skills. 

Top 5 Traditional EMBA Programs

1. HEC Paris
2. University of Chicago Booth School of Business
3. The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania
4. IESE Business School
5. MIT Sloan School of Business

  • Online EMBA: Online EMBAs are hyper-flexible and can be taken by students all over the world – some of them offer hybrid class options. Online EMBAs are a great choice for someone who may not have access to quality in-person classes or does not have enough time to commute.

Top 5 Online EMBA Programs 

1. Duke University Fuqua School of Business
2. University of Virginia Darden School of Business
3. Swiss School of Business and Management Geneva
4. IE Business School
5. UCLA Anderson School of Business 

  • Specialist EMBA: These are EMBA programs that may have a specific concentration on one area. Sustainability, international business, or even STEM concentrated programs are available. 

5. Personal Attention and Global Emphasis 

Something that differs between a normal MBA and an EMBA is that the latter is more personal. There are only so many executives in the world, and with programs being so expensive these programs are small and so each person gets a much higher degree of individual attention. EMBA programs commonly have one-to-one sessions. They also offer catering, travel and lodging packages. 

Some EMBA programs even have global options, in which students can spend time abroad during the program. Or these EMBA programs will bring in professionals from around the world and can provide programs in which EMBA students interact with other EMBA students transnationally. These interactions can serve as networking opportunities.

6. EMBA Return on Investment  

You may be wondering how valuable the EMBA is. Can it really change your career and job outcomes? Yes, it can. The EMBA on average costs about $80,000 dollars a year, with some of the most prestigious EMBA programs costing upwards of $120,000 dollars. Obviously, these programs are extremely expensive, but many companies will sponsor employees to earn an EMBA and, if they don’t, scholarship opportunities for EMBA programs are plentiful. 

The cost may even be worth it as on average EMBA graduates from the top 100 schools saw their salary increase by 57% three years after graduating, with an average 14% increase in salary immediately after graduating. And according to EMBAC (Executive MBA Council) after graduating 39% of EMBA students receive a promotion.

In Review 

The EMBA is a great way to help push your career further. With a variety of courses catering to the interests of business professionals, it can help further one’s own knowledge in a field they may not be familiar with. Though for many EMBA programs either an EA or GMAT score is needed for admission. Here at Apex, we have world-class tutors that can help you get into your desired EMBA program. Learn more now by scheduling a complimentary call with our tutors.

 

Contributor: Lukas Duncan

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How The EA Can Lead To A Fulfilling Career
Posted on
24
Mar 2022

How The EA Can Lead To A Fulfilling Career

The EA (Executive Assessment) is a relatively new exam, meant to specifically test skills related to business leadership and management. Essentially, if we have to sum it up in just a few words, it is a more focused version of the GMAT. The EA and the GMAT are designed by the same company – the GMAC. The EA is designed mainly for EMBA (Executive MBA) applicants and is a shorter, “softer” version of the GMAT. Despite this, taking the EA is a necessary step that can help you take your career to the next level, as getting an EMBA can be a huge boost in your future. 

The EA is a Stepping Stone to the EMBA 

The EMBA is an opportunity for anybody to advance their career opportunities and is designed specifically for those who are trying to move up the ladder. The EA is a short 90-minute test that can be completed during a busy professional’s schedule. The EA is designed for those that don’t have the time to study for hours and hours every day. EMBA students are usually older with more experience and most of them are often around 15 years out of undergraduate school. This means that many candidates are far along in their career path and choose to get an EMBA to help them achieve their career dreams. Thus, taking the EA and subsequently earning an EMBA has the potential to improve your professional and personal life results. 

What Does an EMBA Give You?

The EMBA provides a course curriculum that involves accounting, finance, marketing, and operations, but also focuses on soft skills such as leadership. The EMBA also helps many to see their job from an outside perspective, allowing them to make more calculated and well-reasoned decisions. Another thing the EMBA does is give many an edge in today’s increasingly competitive job market that attracts applicants from across the globe. 

The EMBA, according to the EMBAC (Executive MBA Council), gives students on average a 14.9% salary increase. Moreover, about 39% receive promotions after getting their degree. The EMBA can be very expensive and doesn’t necessarily guarantee success, but according to the GMAC, 94% of EMBA alumni say they would pursue an EMBA again. It is sometimes possible to have employers pay for an EMBA program as well. 

The EA is Accepted for the MBA

Let’s say you may not be interested in becoming an executive – the EA can still help you in furthering your career goals through getting an MBA. The EA is nowadays being accepted more and more often for MBA programs. Part-time, online, Business master’s programs, and even full MBA programs accept the EA. Also, there are great opportunities that come with a good EA score. An MBA gives you ample networking opportunities and top-notch education to really help you in a professional setting, especially with management skills. On top of this, many MBA graduates are among the best paid in any industry. Most companies put a lot of value into an MBA and receiving one can give you a lot of international exposure and even help you move and get a job in a different country. Overall, an MBA is a great way to help bolster your reputation and your resume. 

Top Global Business School Programs Accepting the Executive Assessment

1. American University of Dubai (EMBA Program)
2. University of California Berkeley Haas School of Business (EMBA and Part Time MBA)
3. The University of Chicago Booth School of Business (EMBA and Part-Time MBA)
4. Georgetown University McDonough School of Business (MBA and EMBA)
5. Imperial College Business School (EMBA and Online MBA)
6. Nanyang Business School (Professional MBA)
7. Singapore Management University (EMBA)
8. Stanford Graduate School of Business (MSx)
9. University of Cambridge Cambridge Judge Business School (EMBA)
10. Yale School of Management (EMBA) 

Final Thoughts

The EA is the optimal exam for any professional having trouble balancing the prep time for the GMAT. The EA will gain you admission into an EMBA program which is difficult but extremely rewarding. What the EA can also do, is help you get into other business programs like MBAs. But nevertheless, the EA is a difficult exam and here at Apex GMAT we can help you with world-class tutoring services. The opportunities the EA provides are great, as the exam will give you access to amazing programs without the hassle of the GMAT and will help you towards a brighter career future.

 

Contributor: Lukas Duncan

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Top 5 EA Memorization Techniques
Posted on
17
Mar 2022

Top 5 EA Memorization Techniques

We here at Apex always tell our clients to find what works for them and stick to it. Believe it or not, there is little need to struggle when trying to memorize certain test-taking techniques. Often a simpler solution path is always readily available. Our tutors at Apex are professionals when it comes to helping EA test takers. We teach our clients tips which suit their mental and cognitive abilities. This type of teaching is called Cognitive Empathy. How it works is that we do not force clients into a ‘one-size-fits-all’ box of EA test-prep steps and solution paths. Instead, we work with and support our clients by tailoring our approach so that they have a toolkit of skills which fit their personal needs and capabilities. Here we list four EA memorization techniques which all of our clients learn.  

1. Memorize the answer layout. 

On the EA, some question types have the same responses. On the Data Sufficiency portion, for example, answers are presented in the same way. These are: 

  1. Statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2) alone is not sufficient
  2. Statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (1) alone is not sufficient
  3. Both statements TOGETHER are sufficient, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient
  4. EACH statement ALONE is sufficient
  5. Statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are NOT sufficient

To make the test easier, you can memorize these statements since their order and wording stay the same. We suggest memorizing them in a more simple form. For example: 

  1. Only Statement 1 
  2. Only Statement 2
  3. Only Both Statements together
  4. Each statement alone 

This as a memorization technique will help you cut down on the time you spend on the test. You won’t need to reread the answers each time you encounter them.  

2. Practice vocabulary during the day

This may sound like a fairly simple and obvious trick but trust us. This EA memorization technique helps! The vocabulary section of the EA can be tricky especially if you find your English language skills are subpar. Often people stick to flashcards to help them memorize terms and concepts. While this tactic can be useful, we found that to really engrain the meaning of complex words it is best to use them throughout the day.

We suggest deciding on a handful of words that you consider exceptionally difficult to memorize and commit to using them throughout the day. This will help you learn to structure the word within a sentence while learning how to use the word properly. In addition to using daily vocabulary, we suggest keeping a notebook of the most difficult terms you have come across and reviewing them as your vocabulary grows! 

3. Use Acronyms and Mnemonics

Being out of school for a while means you are likely struggling with remembering math concepts and equations? The EA quantitative portion may appear overwhelming to test-takers. We understand this, which is why we teach our clients how to avoid using math on the EA altogether! But sometimes, the best solution path is the most direct and obvious one. Here are some tricks to remembering some basic math equations and formulas: 

  • Simple Interest Formula
    • Interest = principal x rate x time 
    • I = prt 
    • Remember the equation as: I am Pretty!
  • Distance Formula 
    • Distance = rate x time
    • D = rt
    • This equation can be remembered as the word: dirt 
  • Linear Equation
    • Y = mx + b 
    • B for begin / M for move 
    • To graph a line, begin at the B-value and move according to the m-value (slope) 
  • Multiplying Binomials 
    • (x – a)(x + b) 
    • Remember FOIL for the order: 
      • First
      • Outside
      • Inside
      • Last 
  • Order of Operations
    • When answering an equation which looks something like this: 7 x (4 / 6) + 2 = remember: PEMDAS or Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally 
    • Parentheses 
    • Exponents 
    • Multiplication
    • Division
    • Addition
    • Subtraction 

4. Applying visual meanings to things 

This trick is most useful if you plan on taking the EA online. During your studying, look at what is around you and apply meaning to objects. For example, when working on a certain type of math problem, work out the solution while staring at the radiator in your room. Then, while taking the exam (if you are taking the EA online), look at the radiator if you come in contact with a similar type of problem. This visual trick helps your brain remember since you will be correlating that which you have recently studied with the image of the radiator. If you are taking the EA onsite, consider studying while wearing the same pieces of clothes or jewelry which you will wear during your test. Perhaps play with a bracelet or watch while memorizing words, or wear a comfy sweater which you associate with certain mnemonic devices. We teach our clients this trick and it definitely helps them during the test! 

5. Apply the knowledge you are learning often

Reading things from a textbook and taking notes is one thing. But it is a completely different thing to practically apply the information you are learning. Completing one or two practice questions won’t automatically make you a whiz at that particular type of problem (even if you got the correct answer). Instead, make sure to practice in different locations and use different mediums (such as at a restaurant, while riding the train into work, or while cooking dinner). Doing this will challenge your brain to think strategically in various situations and under different circumstances. You can do this type of learning with the quantitative and qualitative portions of the exam.

Final Thoughts 

However straightforward these EA memorization techniques may seem, they nonetheless require work and dedication. As I am sure you know, hard work does pay off in the long run! The amount of work you put into your studying can dictate where you end up attending school, plus it can help with your future job search. While you are not your EA score, your test score does play a large role in your overall application to your dream school! If you are looking for extra support while preparing for the EA, we here at Apex offer bespoke one-on-one tutoring with high-achieving clients. You can schedule a complimentary, 30-minute consultation call with one of our tutors to learn more! 

 

Contributor: Dana Coggio

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EA as a returning student
Posted on
08
Mar 2022

How To Study For The EA As A Returning Student!

Been a while since you attended university? In regular circumstances, the EA can be a daunting undertaking. But the thought of taking the EA as a returning student can be downright frightening. We here at Apex work often with clients who have spent years outside of an academic setting. Our experts have compiled tips and tricks for returning students to make sure they are on the studying path of ‘least resistance’. Take a look at our 5 suggestions to make your return to high-caliber EA studying as easy and productive as possible. 

1- Take an EA practice test

This may sound straightforward, but we cannot emphasize enough how important it is that you take a practice test before you begin studying for the EA. This test gives you a baseline understanding of where your strengths and where your weaknesses lie. Though you may use math skills on a daily basis, your quantitative knowledge – as it pertains to test-taking – are of a different ilk. By taking a practice test right out of the gate, you can be certain to accurately assess your current skills level and knowledge. From there, you can build your EA study schedule and timeline and figure out which parts of the EA deserve the majority of your dedication. 

2- Find the school and EA score that suits you

What are your goals? It may sound like a perfectly simple question, but unpacking the answer could take time. It is important that you are honest with yourself as to what your goals are and if they are achievable. Achievable being the key term. A mere desire to attend a top B-school and earn an EA score of 165+ is a difficult challenge, especially if your time out of school has been full of non-business-related opportunities. Perhaps your goal is simply to earn an EMBA, and your dream isn’t to attend Harvard or INSEAD. Decide on which schools you want to attend and the EA score needed for admission. Our advice is to find the average EA score of the most recently accepted class and aim for a score of 10+ points over the average. 

3- Get a consistent EA schedule

You are no doubt busy. Working full-time, having a family, living a 9-5 life for a decade or so can truly make you forget the rigors of school. Wanting to earn an EMBA will throw you back into the world of late-night studying and early morning cramming. The EA is your first step into that world. So be sure to create an EA schedule that works with your timeline and personal life. We have created a 3-month timeline template which you can adjust to fit your personal needs. Once you have created a schedule, be sure to Stick. To. It. This may sound like a ‘no-brainer’ but we find our clients have a difficult time with this. We get it, your personal life is always changing, but your EA journey is a short – though intense – one. If your goal is to earn an EMBA, the EA is a necessary stepping stone on that journey. 

4- Learn the EA basics

So you have taken a practice test, have decided on which school(s) you wish to attend, and come up with a consistent EA schedule which works for you. From here, you should unwrap the basics of the EA. Become comfortable with the layout of the test, and the different types of questions you will be confronted with. But the ‘basics’ go beyond a basic understanding of the test structure. You also need to get comfortable with skills you learned during high school, yes, that’s right…HIGHSCHOOL. The quantitative, qualitative, and analytical skills learned during high school play a massive role in your success on the EA. While this may sound astounding, remember how much you have grown intellectually since your time in high school. The skills you gained have just developed and grown since those years, you may just have to unlock your potential. 

5- Utilize the proper resources and Find Help! 

Not all EA prep books are made the same – nor are all EA tutors. You need to look on the market and see which books are structured best for you. With so many on the market, it might be difficult to discern which are best for you. We suggest looking for books which offer numerous solution paths to the same question. This gives you the chance to find the strategies which work for you and your skillset. Additionally, private EA tutors are ideal for students who are taking the EA as returning students. Our Apex tutors are professionals in working with our clients’ strengths and weaknesses. We also have a unique way of teaching the exam where we show our clients how to consider testing questions from a test-maker’s point of view, not a test-taker. 

If you are considering taking the EA as a returning student and are interested in getting help on the EA, we offer 30-minute complimentary consultation calls with one of our top EA scoring instructors. You can learn more about our program by visiting www.apexgmat.com

6- Be proud of yourself! 

If you have decided to return to school and earn an EMBA after years out of academics, you should be incredibly proud of yourself. Such a decision is not an easy one to make, and yet your commitment to achieving your goals is inspiring. During your EA journey, remember to stick with a structured schedule and find help if you need it. Most people don’t go down the EA journey alone, and neither should you!

 

Contributor: Dana Coggio 

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GMAT vs EA
Posted on
01
Mar 2022

GMAT vs EA – The Differences Between These Exams

GMAT vs EA: What are they?

The Executive Assessment (EA) and the GMAT are both admissions exams designed for MBA or EMBA programs. Both are accepted among most MBA programs, with the GMAT being the gold standard of MBA admissions since its release in 1953. In 2016 GMAC, the company that created the GMAT, released the EA. The EA is specifically tailored towards those applying for Executive MBA (EMBA) programs and those who have spent around a decade in the professional business world. Even though the EA is specifically tailored towards EMBA programs it is being more widely used for MBA program admissions. 

Who takes the EA?

The EA is an exam specifically tailored towards experienced professionals. The EA is shorter, with stringent math sections, and is often considered an easier test. It is meant for those who do not have the time to prepare for the standardized tests for MBA programs. In fact, the GMAC specifies that extensive preparation is not meant for the EA and that the EA is meant for those who have acquired skills and knowledge through work experience. This differs from the GMAT in which we recommend a three-month study plan.

GMAT vs EA: Test Structure 

The structure of the EA is simpler than the GMAT, with only three sections instead of four. Both tests have Quantitative, Verbal, and Integrated reasoning sections, but the GMAT has an additional section, the Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA). The EA also only has 40 questions, compared to the GMAT’s 80. But both have drastically different times with the GMAT taking 3 hours and 7 minutes and the EA taking only 90 minutes. 

All three of the EA’s sections take under fifteen minutes, with the GMAT taking over 30 minutes each on both Verbal and Quantitative sections.

Number of Questions: The EA has 40 questions: 12 Integrated Reasoning, 14 Verbal, and 14 Quantitative. On the other hand, the GMAT has 80 questions: 12 Integrated Reasoning, 36 Verbal, 31 Quantitative questions, and 1 question in the AWA section. 

Time of Each Section: The EA has 30 minutes on each section. Whereas the GMAT has 30 minutes on the Integrated Reasoning, 65 on the Verbal, and 62 on the Quantitative. It gives you 30 minutes for the AWA. 

Types of Questions: The two exams have the same types of questions for every section. 

  • IR: Graphics and Table Analysis, Two-Part Analysis, Multi-Source Reasoning
  • V: Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, Sentence Correlation
  • Q: Data Sufficiency, Problem Solving
  • AWA: The GMAT’s AWA tests your argument analysis skills. 

GMAT vs EA: Scoring 

The EA and GMAT score differently. With the GMAT being a more rigorous test, the scoring ranges from 200-800 while the EA ranges from 100 to 200. In the EA you can score up to a 20 on each section, while GMAT scoring is broken down as follows:

GMAT SCORING
Quant: 0-60
Verbal: 0-60
IR: 1-8
AWA: 1-6

When it comes to the scores of the EA and GMAT remember that a good EA score is about 150 or above, while a good GMAT score is 650 or above. In the EA all the sections are weighted equally, while in the GMAT that is not the case. In the GMAT your AWA score is not weighted as heavily as your Quant or Verbal score. So when studying for both tests you must decide your study habits. In the GMAT you may focus on the Integrative Reasoning section less than the Quantitative for example. It is important to keep in mind where your strengths and weaknesses lie. 

To Review

The EA and GMAT are both exams that can help you get into an MBA or EMBA, so it can be difficult to choose between. However, the GMAC designed the two exams differently for a reason. Understanding why they did so is helpful in choosing which one you would like to take. Recognizing your strengths and weaknesses within testing and your goals within admissions can help you determine which one to take.

 

Contributor: Lukas Duncan

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GMAT Myths
Posted on
10
Feb 2022

Top 5 GMAT Myths Debunked

1. It’s harder than the GRE

One of the most common GMAT myths is that it is presumably more difficult than the GRE. 

In their essence, the two exams are different when it comes to their test design, structure, and scoring system. Therefore, their level of difficulty would vary depending on a person’s individual traits. It is only natural that different people will find different things easy. The important question you can ask yourself is which exam would be easier and more suitable for you

The GRE contains three sections – Analytical Writing, Quantitative, and Verbal section. The GMAT, on the other hand, contains four sections – Analytical Writing Assessment, Quantitative Reasoning, Verbal Reasoning, and an Integrated Reasoning section. 

GMAT Verbal vs GRE Verbal

GMAT vs GRE VerbalWhile the GMAT mostly tests people’s grammar and reasoning, the GRE focuses on vocabulary. If you are knowledgeable of complex words, you’ll find the GRE easier. Once again, the level of difficulty is a rather subjective issue. The GMAT Verbal section is 65 minutes while the GRE Verbal section comprises two 30-minute sections.  

GMAT Quantitative vs GRE Quantitative

The two tests contain the same math content: Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry, ‘Real-life’ problems. The difference comes from the way the math is tested. 

The GMAT is not designed to examine your ability to calculate complex mathematical operations but rather your critical thinking and logical approach to problems. To compare, the GRE tests your basic mathematical skills and understanding of concepts. Keep in mind that the GMAT is MBA-program specific. Given the MBA’s quantitative focus, there is more emphasis on that portion of the exam. The GRE, on the other hand, is meant for a plethora of graduate programs, from art history to engineering

2. Expertise in math and English is necessary

Being a proficient English speaker and having great mathematical skills will surely help you score high on the GMAT. Nevertheless, the latter are not requirements. Don’t forget that the GMAT is not designed to test your mastery in these fields but to examine your critical thinking skills. 

Since the exam is entirely in English, you need to have a good understanding of how the grammar of this language works. You should also be fluent enough not to be hindered when trying to understand what you are being asked or what a certain paragraph means. You need to be able to express yourself well when presenting an argument. Other than that, English language proficiency is not required when taking the GMAT.

When it comes to math, it is advisable to have an understanding of basic mathematical concepts like probability, combinatorics, equations, basic statistics, and manipulations with powers and roots. Still, many of the problems are high-school-level math and don’t require expertise. If you have the right approach, you can solve problems with ease

3. You need to spend a year to prepare

Dedicating a whole year to prepare for an exam seems like a daunting task for many. Luckily, it is also not necessary. This is just another misconception related to GMAT preparation. While the time one will need to master their skills is strongly individual, many candidates have achieved good results for a relatively short period of time. 

The Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC), for example, offers an 8-week study timeline for successful performance. According to the GMAC, people who performed well on the exam spent on average 3-6 months to prepare. The results of their 2016 self-reported Prospective Student Survey state that, in general, people who study more, get better results. Candidates who spent 80 hours or more preparing said they scored 600 or higher. 

Spending a long time studying won’t necessarily guarantee you a high score. Numerous factors can affect your performance. Maintaining a healthy sleep schedule, being productive, and effectively managing your time are some of them.

4. Drilling problems is the best way to prepare

Taking a diagnostic test to figure out our strengths and weaknesses and set a baseline for measuring your progress is crucial if you are a beginner. Continuously solving practice test after practice test though, won’t do you any good and is just one of the many GMAT myths for successful preparation among test-solvers. 

By drilling on GMAT problems you will lose hours of your spare time that you can otherwise use more constructively. Attempting problem after problem, without shaking things up, will most likely lead to very little improvement in the long run. 

Instead, spending time identifying strengths and weaknesses should be a part of your study plan. It is a good idea to take a look at answer explanations and eliminate unhelpful or time-consuming approaches and solution pathways. An excellent GMAT preparation also includes establishing a time management strategy and finding the right work-rest balance.

5. A 700 score is required for a top program

Debunking one of the most well-known GMAT myths is crucial for reducing anxiety among applicants. According to the official GMAC Benchmarking Tool, the mean GMAT score is 568.21, and only about 10% of the test-takers score above 700 each year.

Truth to be told, although a 700 score may be helpful for being accepted to top programs worldwide, it is not necessary. Business schools consider a variety of factors when evaluating applicants. 

While the GMAT score is an important part of the admissions procedures for graduate schools, as it allows an objective comparison between individuals, it is certainly not the only important factor to be considered. A strong application can still be reviewed even if the candidate doesn’t have a 700+ GMAT score.

Another aspect of examining GMAT results that should be taken into account is that a given score might be suitable for one business school but unsuitable for another. Thus, depending on your goals, you might need to take a look at the average GMAT scores your dream school accepts.

 

Naturally, this whole process can be much easier if you have someone who can guide you along the way, like a one on one GMAT tutor. Here at Apex, we give every potential client the opportunity of a 30-minute complimentary consultation call with a 770+ scoring instructor.

 

Contributor: Reneta Georgieva

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