EA Verbal Reasoning section
Posted on
23
Dec 2021

EA Verbal Reasoning Section – Everything You Need To Know About It

If you are planning on applying for an MBA or EMBA program, and are a busy professional, you probably had the chance to familiarize yourself with the EA exam. Today, we are going to focus on the EA verbal reasoning section. It includes categories such as sentence correction, reading comprehension, and critical reasoning. The verbal section can seem to be a formidable struggle for non-native English speakers. However, non-native English speakers may actually have a leg-up on the competition.

The verbal reasoning part of the EA is designed to measure your ability to read and comprehend written information, reason and evaluate arguments, and write in standard written English. This can seem intimidating as you may not be used to comprehending and reasoning arguments in languages other than your native language. 

The EA Verbal Section: Layout 

To begin with, you will be given only 30-minutes to answer 14 questions. This gives you approximately 2 minutes for each question. Just like the GMAT, the EA is a computer adaptive exam. This means, by answering a question correctly, the succeeding questions will be harder – and vice versa. The Executive Assessment test is also shorter than the GMAT. As mentioned above, there are three question types on the EA verbal reasoning section:

    • Critical Reasoning
    • Reading Comprehension
    • Sentence Correction

EA Verbal Section – Critical Reasoning 

During critical reasoning, the question will provide you with a textual stimulus, often a brief paragraph of 100 words or less, followed by a question and five answer options. The question will always require you to choose one of the five response options and the correct answer is logically related to the input in some way. 

EA Verbal Section – Reading Comprehension

During the reading comprehension, the question will present you with a short or long passage, as well as two or three related questions. You’ll choose one of five response options for each question relating to a passage. Those will be very similar to what you have already learned from probably the SAT, TOEFL, or other standardized tests. 

In the reading comprehension, the passages and question types include a large range of topics. From science and social science to business. Specific detail and inference questions, just like on the GMAT, are by far the most common. Additional Primary Purpose or Main Idea question types also appear on the test. You will be asked to draw a conclusion based on the argument by detecting the flaws, assumptions, and any discrepancies that might be discernible. 

EA Verbal Section – Sentence Correction

The last part is sentence correction. These questions test your knowledge of English grammar and overall written English. A sentence will be partially or completely underlined in response to a question. You must state which version of the statement is the most logical, straightforward, and free of grammar faults by selecting the proper version of the underlined section from a list of five options. There can be idioms, comparisons, parallelisms, subject-line agreement, etc. Even for native English speakers with a good understanding of syntax, these sentences are typically fairly long with a lot of extra description, which can be perplexing. 

EA Verbal Section – Tips

Now that you have some basic understanding of the EA verbal section and what it consists of, it is time to gain some tips and tricks that will definitely aid you during the preparation process and the exam as well. 

1. Try to nail down your thoughts in English

First, we start off by mentioning that you should train your brain to read and grasp the English language. Try to nail down your thoughts in English. When reading a passage try to understand what the writer is trying to convey and focus on the main idea, try to find out whether the author is presenting a point, argument, telling, or criticizing someone. Even though the EA verbal section is not something that you may encounter every day, you can still find daily sources of practice: like an academic journal or podcast produced by major news outlets such as the New York Times or Wall Street Journal.  

Another approach is to surround yourself with a lot of different words, whether that means doing a daily crossword puzzle or watching English news. Even when you have some leisure time, immerse yourself in English literature. Those can include fiction, magazines, or just stories. You might think that the process can be overwhelming and time-consuming, however, these skills will stick with you throughout your professional and academic careers. It is true that mastering the language comes naturally rather than learning words and idioms by heart, but remember that you are not learning the language from scratch, you are adapting to the format and academic English. Before preparing for the Executive Assessment you should already know the language and be able to recognize all common question types with focused attention and analysis. 

2. Work on your memorization skills

Besides being a good reader and being able to absorb information, work on your memorization skills. Navigate through the words quickly and effectively. Even if you do not understand a certain word or a phrase, being able to navigate through it will strengthen your abilities to feel the language and comprehension skills. When you first start studying, concentrate on one idea at a time. For example, first, focus on your vocabulary and reading, then focus on the grammar and sentence correction. For sentence correction, you can begin with your basic high school materials and some simple rules. 

If English is not the language you frequently use, then take the time to practice EA-related questions. Stick to one concept for a few days before moving to another subject.  Be sure to REVIEW, REVIEW, and REVIEW! No matter what you are planning to study at this point make sure to get back to it and review. Be realistic in the time you are setting aside to study, but never forget to return and fill in the gaps again time after time.

3. Learn how to skim

Learn how to skim. Rapid eye movement during the EA verbal reasoning section is vital. Skimming will help you detect the crucial keywords and get a general idea of the text. Another tip is to look at the answer choices before skimming through the passage so that you know what to be on the lookout for while reading the text. In the beginning, go at your own pace, then start skimming, keeping the time constraints in mind, with this technique the overall experience will be more easily adaptable and accessible for you. 

4. Try to understand something in your own words

The last piece of advice that we are going to give for your EA verbal preparation, is to try to understand something in your own words. If there is a passage or question that you cannot get through just try to put things in your own words and figure out what the answer is in your words and then transform it to an academic language. You are maybe in a word labyrinth, but there is always a way out. The EA verbal section can be baffling with convoluted questions, however, you are able to rephrase everything according to your own convenience and get out of the labyrinth easily. 

 

Final Thoughts 

In this article, we covered the EA verbal reasoning basics. Be sure to develop a study regimen with appropriate time allocation based on your lifestyle. For most people, the Executive Assessment requires an average of about 80-100 hours for most people to adequately prepare for a top score of 155 or above. Remember that by familiarizing yourself with the most fundamental content areas you will expedite the process of acing the verbal section. You secure a good score on the EA verbal portion by putting in hours of focused, targeted practice. Do whatever it takes to truly grasp the subject. Do not be scared of the unfamiliar, make it familiar.

 

Contributor: Ruzanna Mirzoyan

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EA Stress
Posted on
25
Nov 2021

How To Keep Your Sanity While Preparing For The EA

EA Stress

Experiencing too much anxiety over the EA exam might cause a negative impact on your mental health and make it difficult for you to keep your sanity. Moreover, it might even make it more challenging to concentrate when studying and disrupt your sleep schedule. However, with the correct test stress and anxiety-busting tactics, as well as an effective studying schedule, your EA exam preparation may become much simpler.

Here are 7 tips we recommend in order to make your EA exam preparation stress-free and effective.

1. Take an EA Preparation Course

Everyone’s EA experience is different. Some people can get a high score based on everything they already know, without opening an EA book. But, for most students, a preparation course or one-on-one prep time with an EA personal tutor is necessary for two reasons. First, it puts you in the right direction in terms of exam content, strategies, solution paths, and tactics to tackle problems, by helping you structure a concrete and designated studying plan. Secondly, it makes you feel much more confident and emotionally calm, as you work with a trustworthy and experienced professional who knows the ins and outs of the exam and preparation for it and can assist you with anything necessary throughout the process. Apex GMAT, for example, offers complimentary consultation calls for interested individuals, looking for structured and personalized EA preparation. 

2. Create an Effective EA Study Schedule

Don’t wait for the perfect time to take the EA. This moment may never reveal itself! Life will always throw you curveballs and can end up curtailing well-thought-out plans. Situations may arise which could interfere with your EA preparation. During your EA prep, you should take the extra effort to harmonize any unexpected situations with your study schedule.

One effective method you could try is to divide your studying schedule into multiple time frames throughout the day so that you can concentrate in smaller doses rather than studying for 5-7 hours straight and losing your ever so vital focus. Study the materials during the weekdays and devote some part of your weekend to practice tests where necessary. Those, in turn, will help you to assess your progress and help you to understand your main strengths and weaknesses.

3. Control Your Emotions

At some point, the EA will stress you out, making you feel disappointed and frustrated. This is natural! Whether it is an unsatisfactory score on a practice test or the feeling of giving up, the EA can make it easy to have an emotional breakdown. However, it is important to be able to take control of your emotions, and have a “never a failure, always a lesson” attitude. Every time you make a mistake, try to dive deep into that specific concept and figure out why you made that particular mistake, and learn from it. This is exactly how you make progress. Whenever you feel like you can’t go on anymore, remember your goals and aspirations, and that this test is a key to the completion of those. With the proper frame of mind, you will find yourself studying again in no time.

4. Maintain a Connection to Your Support Team

The people you communicate with during your EA preparation process are very important and can hugely affect your frame of mind. Try not to isolate yourself too much from them, spending your whole time in your room cracking all those EA books and practice tests. Instead, spend time with the people whose presence is pleasing to you, who support and believe in you – whether it’s your family, your best friend, or the new acquaintance that has no idea what the EA even is. Constant communication with the people you love will positively affect your overall mentality and help you stay positive when preparing for the test.

5. Get Some Rest and Good Sleep

Another essential thing to remember is to arrange your sleeping schedule. When you need to get up at a certain time, subtract half an hour from the number of hours you wish to sleep. This time becomes the designated moment for turning off the lights. The extra half-hour is crucial, as we frequently overlook the time it takes to get ready for bed, set the alarm clock, and so on. This being said, be cautious as to what you are eating or drinking as an unhealthy diet can negatively affect your sleep schedule. Although the effects of caffeine may differ from person to person, try to avoid all sources of caffeine after 3 p.m. and modify accordingly. Aside from coffee, caffeine is found in a variety of foods and drinks, including tea, chocolate, and carbonated beverages. However, there are benefits to caffeine products when consumed thoughtfully. 

6. Celebrate Your Big and Little Achievements

Your EA preparation process aims to help you reach your goals! Reward yourself a little – take a moment and celebrate your achievements – whether it is seeing progress on practice test scores or a new reading tactic that you finally mastered. It will help you feel more positive and confident about your overall knowledge and skills and be brave enough to challenge yourself with tougher concepts. As you progress down your EA journey, be sure to celebrate your short- and long-term accomplishments. These moments of celebration will undoubtedly assist you in keeping yourself on top of your game.

7. Doing Things You Love

Nothing can ever make you happier than doing what you love. Whether it’s singing, dancing to your new favorite pop song, or watching movies, you should devote some time to distracting yourself from studying by doing the things you enjoy. Not only will this help you not to feel pressured and overwhelmed by all those EA materials, but it will also make you feel much more energetic, full of life, and HAPPY. These are absolutely necessary for you to perform as well as possible on your EA test.

 

Contributor: Nemrout Safarian

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EA Prep Calendar
Posted on
23
Nov 2021

How To Create The Perfect EA Prep Calendar?

Congratulations, you have decided to continue with your education! Deciding to attend business school is a big step. It will open up doors to further opportunities for you, both intellectually and professionally. Having an EMBA under your belt can help you earn that promotion or pay raise in your professional career. Regardless of why you are deciding to attend business school, one large hurdle stands in your way, the Executive Assessment. 

For many, the EA can seem like a daunting task. Especially for those individuals who are returning to school years after completing their undergrad. But the task of successfully studying for and taking the EA is doable. As long as you are driven, determined, and willing to set a strict study schedule, your business school dreams are within your grasp. 

Here at Apex GMAT, we have created the perfect EA prep calendar for future EA test takers. By following the simple steps we have laid out, you can get the most out of your EA preparation and ace your exam! 

Steps to your Perfect EA Prep Calendar

First, grab a calendar, yearly planner, or your phone. You will need to mark the dates and times necessary for studying. 

1. Figure out when you want to take the EA

So, you want to go to business school. Once you have figured out what type of program you want to attend, you need to find the perfect business school program for you. For most business schools an EA entrance exam is required. Some schools offer EA waivers, however, these are rare and are usually offered on a case-by-case basis. Once you have found the programs you are applying to, check out their application deadlines. Based on these deadlines, you can figure out when you need to take the EA.

It would be suggested to take the EA well before the admissions deadlines. Often, your EA scores last at least 5-years, meaning you could technically take the EA a few years before you apply to business school. However, here at Apex, we suggest you take the EA a couple of months before the admissions deadline. This is because, if you happen to get a score lower than expected, you will have time to retake the test and aim for a higher score. 

Count back 3 months from the test date. THIS is the day you will begin your official EA test prep. 

2. Take a free practice test

Before you even begin studying for the EA, you need to take a practice exam. By taking a practice exam, you will know right away where your strengths and weaknesses are. It will also give you a baseline to know how to study and which parts of the exam require the most effort from you. By keeping track of your score, you will also see your progress as you go along your EA prep journey. 

Determine strengths and weaknesses

3. Capitalizing on when you can best prep 

Are you a morning bird? A night owl? Do you find your brain works best during the afternoon? Knowing this about yourself can help you set your daily study schedule. If you find that your brain works best bright and early, then try to carve out an hour or two each morning to study before heading off to work or going to class. If you enjoy studying late at night, then find time after work or after dinner where you can spend two hours preparing. Once you have decided what time of day you want to study, it is important to keep a daily schedule. It is best to find a rhythm that you work best with so that your mind and body are prepared to study each day. 

Are you a Morning Bird? A Night Owl? 

4. Create An EA Study Plan

Great. You have decided on your test date, you have counted backward by 3 months, and you have determined what time of day you wish to study. Pull out your calendar, yearly planner, or phone and write down the content you want to cover during each week.

Week 1 – EA Basics

Put aside 1 or 2 hours each day in either the morning or the night where you study for the EA. During this first week, you will get acquainted with the EA Test Basics. 

    • Become familiar with the EA format and content. Prepare yourself for what you are about to encounter during the next 3 months and on the day of your EA exam. This includes getting comfortable with the EA structure, sections, timing, and scoring.
    • Analyze the results from your EA practice test. As you are in the process of reviewing the results of your practice test, it would be helpful to ask yourself some questions to better understand the difficulties you encountered. When analyzing the solutions of some questions you got wrong or maybe you weren’t totally confident about, take note of any patterns. What section/s did you find most challenging? Which types of questions within each section were you struggling most with? Also, don’t forget to ask yourself questions about the “bigger picture” like: Were you able to finish every section? Did you feel anxious? How did you feel at the end of the test?

Week 2 – EA Integrated Reasoning Section

Great, it’s week two! During your first week, you have overviewed what to expect on the EA overall. Now it is time to get a little bit more specific. Keeping your same daily schedule (whether you study in the AM or PM), change your study content to familiarize yourself with the EA Integrated reasoning section. Read about which types of Integrated Reasoning questions and content that you are most likely to come across during your 3 months of preparation, mock tests, and the EA test.

    • Review EA questions. Before diving deeper into preparing for this section, take some time to read about the types of questions the logical reasoning section asks. Make flashcards with the different EA question types so that you are prepared when you encounter the graphics, tables, and multi-source reasoning associated with the Integrated Reasoning section. If you found that during the practice test the Integrated Reasoning section was easy-breezy, consider studying exceptionally difficult problems.
      The EA is computer adaptive meaning as you answer successive questions correctly, you will be given increasingly harder questions to answer. Additionally, when you encounter a moderate or ‘easy’ question where answering quickly can save you time for a more difficult section.
    • Learn the underlying EA concepts related to each topic. In this section, you will come across information presented in multiple formats. Learning how to pick up on patterns and analyze the data can be fundamental to finding the solution to the problems. In order to not get stuck during the exam and waste your precious time, learning about the most frequently used EA concepts is helpful.

Week 3 – EA Verbal Section

It’s week three! Bearing in mind how you have been studying for the past two weeks, be sure to maintain your same study schedule for this week. During this week it is time to get acquainted with the EA Verbal section. A great way to start working with the Verbal section is to become familiar with the overall structure of this section. This section is 30-minutes long and is broken down into 3 sections. Questions test your ability to analyze arguments and understand, edit and read written English. 

    • Learn how to tackle each type of question. There are three types of questions in the Verbal section (Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and Sentence Correction) and their purpose is to test certain skills. This means that for each of them you have to use particular strategies.
      • Tip. It’s more effective to concentrate on one area at a time. So, while preparing for this section, choose one subsection and stick with it for a couple of days. For example, your third week could look something like this: Monday & Tuesday Reading Comprehension, Wednesday & Thursday Critical Reasoning, and Friday & Saturday Sentence Correction, with Sunday being a rest day. 

Week 4 – EA Quantitative Section and Monthly check-in

    • Review your EA Math. Before diving deeper into preparing for this section, take some time to brush up on some of the formulas, definitions, and topics of the Maths section. Make flashcards with the necessary formulas so you can memorize which formula should be used for which problem(s). If you found that during the practice test the quantitative section was easy-breezy, consider studying exceptionally difficult problems given that the EA is a computer adaptive test.
    • Learn the underlying EA concepts related to each topic (percents, ratios, exponents, statistics, etc). In this section, you will come across some specific wording that can be fundamental to finding the solution to the problems. In order to not get stuck during the exam and waste your precious time, learning about the most frequently used concepts is helpful.

By the end of the week, it will have been a month since you started studying. If you have stuck to your study schedule, you have most definitely made progress. Now it is time to put that progress to the test! 

    • Take your second practice test. As the saying goes “Practice makes perfect.” The more you get yourself exposed to EA  practice exams, the more likely you are to achieve your desired score.
    • Review your results. While looking at the answer explanations, pay attention to the solutions of the questions you got incorrectly.
    • Practice the type of questions you are having difficulties with. Identify the questions where you are spending more time than you should. Read some articles that recommend tips, strategies, and tactics that can assist in solving them faster. 

Week 5 – EA Integrated Reasoning Section Review

It is week five, and you now have two practice tests under your belt. You should be seeing progress in your ability to take the exam. Time to refine your reviewing and fortify your strengths while strengthening your weaknesses in the Integrated Reasoning section. 

    • Practice and enhance your knowledge of tables and graphics, multi-source reasoning, and two-part analyses. Now that you are familiar with these terms it’s a good time to start reading some strategies on how to tackle these EA types of questions. After doing that, practicing what you just learned by solving problems focused particularly on these types of questions is extremely beneficial to your progress. 

Week 6 – EA Verbal Section Review

    • Practice and enhance your knowledge of EA Verbal questions. You can find articles about tips specifically about these types of questions and while practicing you be sure to make use of them. Another practical thing to do is read about articles related to common mistakes and how to avoid them. 

Week 7 – EA Quantitative Section

    • Make yourself acquainted with the EA Quantitative section. This is the step that, as you have seen so far, applies to every EA section. You can’t anticipate doing well on a task without knowing what is expected from you.
    • Review EA Data Sufficiency and Problem-Solving questions. This is something that might come in handy when encountering a tough question on test day. 

When it comes to the EA Quantitative section make sure to practice. practice. practice. Working on answering multiple questions in a day. This will help you master your timing and get used to the structure you may see on the EA. 

Week 8 – Monthly Progress Check

    • Time for another EA practice test! After studying for almost every section, taking some mock tests will assist in keeping track of your progress.
    • Review your results. This time try to identify the topics you are still not comfortable with. Solely taking EA mock tests without analyzing the explanations to questions is not going to be much help.
    • Practice the type of questions you are struggling with. After analyzing these practice tests and understanding the patterns of your weaknesses, working more on the questions you find challenging leads to score improvements.

Week 9 – Review your Weaknesses, Solidify your Strengths

You have been spending a lot of your time preparing for the EA. It is an arduous journey, but you’re not alone! During week 9, it is best to spend time reviewing the parts of the exam that you are most struggling with. Whether it is Verbal or Quantitative, spend a few hours a day reviewing those parts of the exam that you are most worried about. 

At the same time solidify your strengths. If you are a powerhouse on the logical section, that doesn’t mean you should no longer study that portion. Switch between your strengths and weaknesses during this week in both the Verbal and Quantitative sections. If you know of someone else who is taking the EA, get together with them and swap tips and tricks on how they are tackling studying. Finding a study buddy is especially helpful as you can both be emotional support from one another! 

Week 10 – Time and Stress Management

Some other significant factors to consider while working on preparing for the EA  test are time and stress management. A good start is reading a handful of blogs and articles that suggest many tips and strategies that can help you improve your time and stress management skills.

Week 11 – Review and Relax 

During the last week don’t put a lot of pressure on yourself. Instead, try to take care of your mind and body as much as you can. One last brief review focused primarily on the sections or type of questions you struggled most with is going to be enough. Finally, the most important tip, don’t forget to enjoy your EA preparation journey.

 

We at the Apex team hope that you find this EA study plan helpful. If you want to discuss your progress and possibly have some 1 on 1 preparation sessions with us, we would be happy to help, set up a complimentary consultation call with an EA instructor.

 

Contributor: Dana Coggio

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EA procrastination
Posted on
18
Nov 2021

5 EA Study Habits To Incorporate Now To Avoid Procrastination

You have everything prepared. Your desk is neat and tidy, your books are placed perfectly within reach, your computer is on, and your flashcards are written. Perhaps you have brewed a fresh cup of coffee and have just settled in with every intention to study for the next few hours. But lo and behold, 3 hours later, you find yourself glued to your phone, having wandered down the youtube rabbit hole and watching your fifth 20-minute video on how paint dries! 

You can’t help but be frustrated with what just happened. And it happens more often than people would like to think. Whether it is spending hours cleaning your room or gazing wistfully out the window, procrastination is every student’s worst nightmare and biggest foe. When studying for the EA, you will encounter opportunities to procrastinate around every corner.

So how do you overcome these distractions?

We have 5 tips and tricks which you can incorporate into your study schedule to avoid EA procrastination. Whether you are just starting out, or you are already months deep into your study schedule, these habits can be incorporated now and follow you throughout your EA journey and into your professional future. 

1. Acknowledge when you procrastinate

Maybe you are staring out the window because it is a beautiful day, or you are maddeningly vacuuming your home because it’s been needing to get done. Regardless, you’re procrastinating. And the first step in overcoming procrastination is to admit when you are procrastinating. If you find yourself in the middle of a cleaning session, there is no need to stop in the middle of your task. Rather, re-evaluate why you are cleaning. Is it to avoid studying or is it because you’ve been meaning to vacuum for a while. Regardless, finish what you are doing. Finish vacuuming, finish staring out the window, finish cooking or cleaning. While completing your task, however, begin thinking about your study schedule. What will you be studying and for how long? Once you complete your procrastination task, sit down and begin studying. You should have spent the last hour(s) mentally preparing for the studying session, and by the time you are ready to begin your body and mind should be fully primed. 

2. Create a list and a reward system 

Yes, this may sound cliche, but lists (and rewards) help! Before sitting down to study, write out what you are planning on doing during the session. Create a list with high-priority and low-priority tasks. Establish a rewards system. What do you crave most when studying? Do you want to take a walk? Clean? Chat with a friend? After completing a high-priority task, reward yourself with a cleaning session, or a quick walk around the block. This will keep you on your toes and create a rhythm which your body adapts to. 

3. Free yourself of perfectionism 

It’s important to expect the best for and from yourself. However, striving for perfectionism on a daily basis can lead to stress and anxiety. Be realistic in what you can accomplish while studying for the EA. Not every day will be a perfect study day. But studying every day, whether perfect or not, will bring you one step closer to achieving your EA goals. Also, recognize that you may not find the perfect time to study every day. Some days are more full than others. On days where studying is difficult to sit down and accomplish, find time in between the chaos to review old concepts. Whether it is flipping through vocab flashcards or attempting a couple of math problems, any form of studying is worth doing (whether perfect or not). 

4. Improve your surroundings

The age of technology is full of distractions. We suggest putting away unnecessary technology. If necessary, put your phone in another room, set it to silent, and close all unnecessary tabs on your computer. If you study better with music, we suggest listening to music which is calm and without lyrics. Lo-Fi study beats, for example, are opportune for the studying brain to zero in and focus on the task at hand. Additionally, make sure your desk and study center is free of clutter. This removes visual distractions and forces you to focus on the studying materials lying directly in front of you. If you live with multiple people, let them know that you have blocked out a certain number of hours for studying and ask them to not distract you during this time. 

5. Forgive yourself

Shoulda, coulda, woulda. We hear this a lot. But what is in the past is already behind you! So don’t fret about trying to fix what has already passed. Instead, train your focus on the task that lies in front of you, and trust that you will make the best decisions for your study schedule going forward. 

Your EA score and future business school opportunities are dependent on how hard you are willing to work for it. EA procrastination is a normal part of studying. Developing habits now which can help you manage your procrastination will make a world of difference during your EA journey.

 

Contributor: Dana Coggio

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EA Retake
Posted on
16
Nov 2021

How To Study For Your EA Retake

You’ve studied countless hours, canceled plans with numerous friends, and even changed your diet and caffeine consumption to fuel your brain as best as possible. And yet, after all that, your final score result is just a 157. Not bad, but also not perfect. This score can get you into most Business School programs, but can it get you into that elite ‘top’ school you are aiming for? If you have the resume and top-notch essay responses to back up your EA score, then you may feel comfortable applying to your dream Business School with that score.

But what if you are still unsure? Is it worth spending the hundreds of dollars, and continuing the stringent study plan you had just spent months trudging through to try again? Perhaps a second attempt means you will bump up your score to a 165, or maybe your second attempt will land you with a score of equal or – gulp – lesser value! After going through the cost-benefit analysis of such an undertaking, you may have decided on the undertaking of retaking the EA.

But how do you study for the EA the second time to guarantee a higher score?

You are not alone in asking this question, and, unfortunately, there is no ‘one-size-fits-all’ answer or study plan that can guarantee a higher score and make the retake worthwhile financially and timewise. However, there are some things you can begin doing now which can help you embark on your EA retake journey.

1. Book the EA retake sooner rather than later

Deciding on ‘when’ to retake the EA can have a huge effect on your ability to succeed in the test. We suggest booking the retake sooner rather than later. This will help set a definite timeline of how long you must study and how you can expect to structure the coming weeks. Additionally, don’t wait months to retake the EA. Once you have decided that you will retake the exam, be sure to schedule it a couple of weeks after the last test you took. While it may seem to be a time crunch, this is because you are not starting from scratch when studying for your retake. You already have a whole host of wealth stuck in your head! It will hang around for a few weeks, requiring only brief reviews and refreshers to keep the knowledge up to date.

2. Focus on your weaknesses

So, you have taken your first EA test. You now know how you test under time pressure, and you can adjust your studying accordingly. Did you find that you struggled with the time constraints? We suggest focusing on different studying methods which will help you feel more comfortable under the time constraints. During the test you may realize that you did not study enough for certain quantitative-type questions, or your EA vocabulary was lacking. In this case, spend time before your retake focusing on the areas you found most challenging. By no means does this mean ‘ignoring’ your strengths, rather, spend the most time on your weaknesses, being sure to set aside a few hours a week to review and rehash the parts of the exam you feel most comfortable with.

3. Consult with your network

Whether you recognize it or not, the people around you are important to your mental health and wellbeing. Because studying for the EA is a mentally draining venture, relying on your network can help you get through the most difficult aspects of studying for the EA. As you already experienced over the last few months of studying, an effective student may opt for moments of quiet study rather than social events with friends and family. This doesn’t change your second time around taking the test.

However, your friends and family may be disappointed to hear that you are extending your absences from events further to study for your second round. It is important, then, to confer with them. Let them know what you are doing and why. Perhaps someone in your network had a similar experience and they can offer you advice and tips on how to rock your second round. Additionally, do not be shy to let them know how you are feeling and how they can best support you during your studying. This can help alleviate any further stress you may accumulate during the time you sequester away over the books.

4. Get an EA private tutor

It may seem obvious but hiring a private tutor who specializes in the EA can help push you to the next level. Often, your struggles with the EA can be alleviated by the unique perspectives and solution paths a private tutor can give you. Our EA tutors at ApexEA specialize in working with students who want to achieve an elite score and are looking to develop the skills to do just that. We invite all interested potential clients to sign-up for a complimentary consultation call where we can discuss your EA and Business School goals. Our tutors are happy to work with an array of clients. Whether it is their first or fifth time taking the EA and whether they have 6 months to prepare or just a few weeks, we can work within your time frame and skill level to help you achieve your goals.

 

Finally, deciding to retake the EA means countless more hours of hard work. Deciding whether it is worth it is up to you, however, being prepared for the process of retaking the EA can help alleviate the stress of the decision.

 

Contributor: Dana Coggio

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5 Executive Assessment Test Prep Strategies to Help You Prepare Effectively
Posted on
23
Sep 2021

5 EA Test Prep Strategies to Help You Prepare Effectively

By: Apex GMAT 
Contributer: Altea Sulollari
Date: September 23, 2021

Let’s set the scene: you are a working professional looking to get into an Executive MBA program in order to give you a competitive edge to advance your career. That sure seems like a good plan, but there is one step that you’re missing: you need to take an Executive Assessment exam before getting admitted to a top EMBA program.

The executive assessment is similar in structure to the GMAT exam and it aims to test similar skills but also those that you have acquired during your career. As such, there is no need to extensively prepare for the exam, however, there are a few strategies that can help you get the score you’re aiming for, and we are here to tell you all about them.

The Executive Assessment (EA) Exam – Explained

The Executive Assessment exam is an admissions exam designed for working professionals who are aiming to get into different Executive MBA (EMBA) programs. The exam tests on-the-job skills like problem-solving and critical thinking. It is usually done over a shorter period of time as it includes fewer sections than the GMAT exam, and that is why you do not necessarily need to spend an extensive period of time preparing for this exam.

The EA is similar in structure to the GMAT exam. However, it only features 3 main sections (the Verbal section, the Quantitative Reasoning section, and the Integrated Reasoning section), as opposed to the GMAT which also contains an additional AWA section. When it comes to the question difficulty, the Executive Assessment is regarded as an easier exam than the GMAT, as it is not item-adaptive, meaning that it does not get easier or harder depending on the previous question. Rather, the Executive Assessment exam is section-adaptive, thus it changes after a block of questions. 

The Executive Assessment contains a total of 40 questions that are to be completed within a 90-minute time frame. There are 12 questions in the Integrated Reasoning section, and 14 questions on the Quantitative Reasoning and in the Verbal section respectively. The score ranges from 100-200 points. Keep in mind that a 150+ score is considered a good enough score that can get you into a top program.  

This exam has a shorter time duration as it contains fewer sections and it is often regarded as an easier exam compared to the GMAT. 

5+ EA Test Prep Strategies 

Here are the best strategies to help you with your EA test prep:

Provide yourself with enough time to practice and create a schedule!

Refrain from leaving the bulk of your prep to the last 2 weeks. Instead, create a schedule and try to follow it rigorously so you can work a bit every day. It is true that you do not need as much preparation before you take the Executive Assessment exam as you would when taking the GMAT exam. However, it is a good idea to be prepared for everything that will be coming your way so you know what to expect on test day. That is why you need to set time aside for your EA prep. You’d also want to dedicate short periods of time to your prep instead of a full 2-3 hours at a time. That way, you won’t feel overwhelmed and you’ll be able to see progress in a shorter period of time.

Practice a lot!

The more practice you get before you take the actual exam, the more familiar you’ll get with the structure of the exam and the question types. That will make you feel more confident come test day. Practice will also help you get a feel of what the actual Executive Assessment will be like on test day. You won’t know what to expect until you practice with mock tests and see for yourself.

Pro tip: Apart from the books, guides, and mock exams, you can also try to include prep videos into your routine. EA prep videos are a great method that will help you cover more material in a shorter period of time, and you also won’t get bored from reading all the time.

Stay focused!

Try to stay focused on your schedule and avoid distractions that will draw your attention away from the exam prep. Keeping yourself focused will help you get more done and in a shorter period of time. That is why you should refrain from using your phone during your EA prep time. You can also create To-Do lists with small tasks to complete each day. In that way, you’ll know what you have to do each day in order to see progress during your preparation, and you’ll be more focused and motivated to work harder.

Time yourself!

The Executive Assessment is a timed exam. Therefore, the best way to go about preparing for it successfully is to practice under a time constraint. That will help you gauge how well you’ll perform under time pressure and will help you get used to the timing consideration.

Pro tip: ApexGMAT’s tutors suggest practicing without time constraints in the beginning. Once you’re more familiar with the test structure and the question types, you can introduce the concept of time in your test prep. That way, you will be able to focus on mastering the concepts before including the added level of time into the mix.

Try EA tutoring

Hire an EA private tutor to help you with your preparation. A specialized tutor will help you focus on what is important and will help you get the most out of your prep. They will also know how to tailor the experience to your own specific needs so you’ll be able to master the exam and use your time strategically.

If you are interested in hiring a private tutor to help you with your Executive Assessment test prep, you can schedule a time to discuss your goals with a top-scoring EA instructor here!

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How Difficult is the Executive Assessment
Posted on
10
Jun 2021

How Difficult is the Executive Assessment?

By: Dana Coggio
Published:  10th June 2021

How Difficult is the Executive Assessment?

As subjective as that question is, you are not the first person to be asking it. When comparing the Executive Assessment to the GMAT a general conclusion has been reached that this test is easier. As it is geared towards individuals who have already been working in the field of business and management for quite some time, there is an expectation for people taking the exam that they may not have an exorbitant amount of time put towards studying and preparing. At 1.5 hours, the Executive Assessment takes only half as long as the GMAT. Quant questions on the exam are geared towards individuals who have been out of school for quite some time, and thus may not remember basic high school or college math techniques so some of the quantitative sections that you would find on the GMAT are not on the Executive Assessment, such as Geometry.

Even the format of the exams is not as strict as that of the GMAT. During the exam, you will have the ability to jump around from question to question within a section. Unlike the GMAT, where each question is successive without the possibility to review, the EA gives you the possibility to return to questions to redo or review them. Keep in mind, however, that you will not receive any additional time to review your questions.

Taking all this into account, it is quite impossible to give a quantifiable answer on whether or not the EA is difficult. Given its structure and the amount and type of questions, it can be assumed that the Executive Assessment test is easier, if not of the same caliber, as the GMAT test.

Structure of the EA

Simply put, the Executive Assessment test is designed and structured to best cater towards individuals who may be too busy with work, family, or other important priorities to commit to the GMAT. Meant for EMBA programs, the Executive Assessment is similar to the GMAT in that it tests and measures your complex judgement, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills.

The Executive Assessment is a 90-minute exam split up into three sections and scored between 100 and 200 points. The three sections are the Verbal Section, the Quantitative Section, and the Integrated Reasoning Section. (Feel free to click on the links to read more on these sections – as they may appear on the GMAT – and how to study for them). All three sections are 30-minutes in length, with the Verbal and Quantitative sections having a total of 14 questions and the Integrated Reasoning having 12. Similar verbal and quantitative questions can be found on both the Executive Assessment and the GMAT. The Integrated Reasoning Portion, on the other hand, is weighted exactly the same as the other two sections. This is different than on the GMAT where the Integrated Reasoning is weighted less than the other sections.  

Another striking difference between the GMAT and the EA is how it is administered online. Unlike with the GMAT, those who take the EA are given the opportunity to review their answers and change any responses they would like. Another difference is that the EA’s Quantitative and Verbal sections are section adaptive (compare that to the GMAT which is question adaptive. You can read more about the structure of the GMAT HERE.) The sectionality of the EA means that there are two subsections within each portion of the test that consists of 7 questions each. This is an advantage for the test taker as, at the end of each section, you have the possibility to review your answers and change any responses within the subsection. 

Percentiles of the GMAT vs EA

There is little data available on Executive Assessment scores and their impact on school admissions. This is because the Executive Assessment first came out in 2016. The Executive Assessment has published that a score of 150 ranks an individual as being in the 50th percentile, though more percentiles have not been released. That being said, preliminary data show that a score of 168 and above places an individual within the 99th percentile.

As with the majority of admissions processes your score is just one of many factors that is taken into account when you apply for an EMBA program. However, for admission to a top-tier EMBA program, scoring above a 150 is very important. Even better would be to score above a 163 which would set you apart from other applicants. If you are interested in EA prep materials or finding a private tutor to help you in your journey to reach your goal click HERE.  

How the EA is scored

The Executive Assessment score ranges from 100-200. However, according to GMAC, it is not possible to score lower than a 120 or higher than a 174. Thus, scoring above a 160 makes an applicant more competitive. Because the Executive Assessment is designed for individuals who have quite a few years of practical experience under their belt, the questions on the exam are meant to draw upon the knowledge you may have gained during your work experience. That being said, you should still take the time to study for the exam so that you can answer the questions being asked within a narrow timeframe. Just like with the GMAT, study materials for the EA are available as well as tutors who can help you achieve your desired score. More information on various prep materials can be found HERE. If you are interested in learning more about a potential EA tutor, you can set up a complimentary call with an APEX instructor HERE

 

Where the EA is accepted

Many top-tier business schools accept your EA exam results. The following schools are some (but not all) which do accept the EA exam in place of the GMAT for their EMBA Programs:

  1. Chicago Booth   
  2. INSEAD   
  3. Duke Fuqua  Yale School of Management
  4. Emory – Goizueta Business School   
  5. NYU – STERN         
  6. Berkeley Haas          
  7. ESMT Berlin  UNC – Kenan Flagler Business School        
  8. London Business School
  9. University of Oxford Vlerick Business School      
  10. University of Pennsylvania – Wharton 
  11. MIT Management. Sloan School        
  12. IE Business School     
  13. University of Virginia                

 

 

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executive assessment test
Posted on
03
Jun 2021

All You Need To Know About The Executive Assessment Online

by: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Uerda Muça
Date: 3rd June 2021

As a consequence of the Covid-19 pandemic almost every exam has to now be taken online, including the Executive Assessment. Since this was an unprecedented situation, it has taken some time to adjust to these changes. When introducing something new, it is understandable that many questions might arise. So, in this article, you will find all there is to know about the Executive Assessment Online Exam. 

What is the EA Online?

The Executive Assessment Online is an online and remote proctored version of the Executive Assessment. This interim solution was developed to assist both test-takers and schools during the closure of the test centers as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic. The new online format intends to assist those applicants who are working on meeting their upcoming application deadlines. 

What important information should you know about EA Online?

How long is the EA Online?

The timing for the Executive Assessment Online hasn’t changed; it is still 90 minutes, 30 minutes per section. Apart from the 90 minutes, we suggest setting aside 15 minutes before the exam starts for the check-in process. During this process, you will be asked to show a valid government-issued ID that has a recognizable and recent photo (e.g. passport or driver’s license). Also, your identity will be verified via facial recognition technology, meaning that you will have to show your face on the camera of the device you’re using. 

What is the structure of the Online EA?

The format of the Executive Assessment Online has remained the same as the structure of the Executive Assessment exam delivered in test centers. The exam includes 3 main sections: Quantitative Reasoning (14 questions), Verbal (14 questions), and Integrated Reasoning (12 questions). Besides the number of questions per section not changing, the types of questions you should expect in each section haven’t changed either. 

How is the Executive Assessment Online scored?

The scoring algorithm and the scoring scale used in the test center-based version are used for the Section Score and Total Score in the online version of the Executive Assessment. The total scale of the exam ranges from 100 to 200 while the scale for each section varies from 0 to 20. Even though the IR section has fewer questions than the other two sections, they are weighted all the same when determining your total score. 

When is the Executive Assessment Online available?

Since it is an online version of the Executive Assessment, appointments are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. An appointment can be scheduled up to 24 hours before an available testing window. 

Who can take the Executive Assessment Online?

If you’re wondering if there are any requirements you have to fulfill in order to take the Executive Assessment Online, the answer is no; it’s open to all test takers. However, due to regulatory and local data privacy rules, the Executive Assessment Online is NOT available in these locations:

  • Cuba 
  • Iran
  • Mainland China
  • North Korea
  • Sudan

Who will protect the exam’s integrity?

As mentioned, the Executive Assessment Online is a remote proctored exam. Just like in the Executive Assessment taken in a test center, human proctors are going to monitor you (your session and your workspace). The only difference is that the whole process is supported by AI technology. Something else to keep in mind is that your assessment (audio feeds and live video) is going to be recorded. 

Quick tip. Don’t forget to ask proctors for help if you encounter any issues. Just click on the chat link within the OnVUE application or wave your hand to speak to the proctor.

How often can I take the Executive Assessment Online?

You can take the Executive Assessment Online up to two times. However, a really important clarification to make here is that these two attempts provided by the online version of the exam are independent of any attempts completed in a Test Center. Also, if you happen to go through some technical issues and are required to take the test again, it doesn’t count as an extra attempt. 

As per your second online attempt, it can be scheduled before or after your first online test. Keep in mind that there should be at least 16 days between the two appointments, meaning the second appointment has to be scheduled at least 16 days after your first attempt. 

How much does the Executive Assessment online cost?

The registration fee for the Executive Assessment Online is $350 (USD) and you don’t have to worry about costs associated with rescheduling since free unlimited reschedules are included in this price and also you will get your scores without any extra cost. However, if you decide to cancel your appointment, a $100 (USD) cancellation fee applies.

Important!  No appointment changes can be made within 24 hours of a scheduled appointment time.

Since it was first introduced in March 2016, the format of the Executive Assessment has not changed, and adapting to the new online version might take some time. However, now that you know what to expect in terms of the format, scoring, and availability of the exam, the process of adaptation is going to get smoother. 

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5 Takeaways from a Successful EA Journey
Posted on
25
Feb 2021

5 Takeaways from a Successful EA Journey

By: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Uerda Muca
Date: 25th February, 2021

Each client that contacts us is in a different stage of their Executive Assessment prep, but a universal constant is that each is striving for a great 165+ EA score. The threshold difficulty standing in their way is the lack of a proper mindset, which in turn can lead to a poor performance, whether due attitude, inefficient solving mechanisms, misplaced focus, or myriad other issues. No matter what, mindset leads the way to performance.

To adjust one’s way of perceiving problems requires much more intricate work than cramming a bunch of material, facts, and figures. Taking the time to understand this and elevate your approach to the test is challenging but ultimately rewarding come test day. Here are five takeaways that anyone scoring 150 or better on the Executive Assessment comes to realize along their EA journey. These insights that help test takers thrive help top performers continue to excel in their EMBA/grad school programs and in their post-EMBA careers, long after the Executive Assessment is a distant memory. 

It is not what you know… it’s what you do with it. 

The EA is a psychometric exam. It expects you to be knowledgeable in a core group of secondary school concepts. It’s not a knowledge test, but it uses this universe of information as a baseline that everyone reasonably has been exposed to long before they thought about the Executive Assessment. The exam tests not so much your knowledge but your creative application of that knowledge.

In the process of preparing for your EA it is vital to maximize your performance, which necessitates deep understanding of seemingly straightforward concepts so that you can be flexible in how you navigate them. For instance, in the Integrated Reasoning section there is a high chance that you will come across an unfamiliar graph you need to use. In such a case the ability to draw conclusions from known graphs and apply them to the new situation is much more valuable than having seen the specific graph before.

This holds true well beyond the exam. The amount of information you will be exposed to within the 2 years of a top tier EMBA program is staggering. In order to thrive in this demanding environment you must be selective, actively deciding what information you take on to master, and use universal thinking tools (heuristics and mental models) to be adaptable as new concepts and information come your way.

For the Executive Assessment, the core concepts are indeed essential. But it is also important to notice what concepts and information you can derive from fundamental knowledge and how to do so, hence not needing to memorize it. Knowing how to successfully apply your knowledge will result in efficiency which will afford you the ability and time to excel in the EA, explore what your EMBA has to offer, and be a thought leader in your chosen career. 

Prioritization is crucial 

On the Executive Assessment there are harsh penalties for unanswered questions, so it is vital to complete each section in the time allotted. Therefore, proper time and process management is critical when sitting the exam. Essentially, each problem represents a decision where you must weigh the likelihood of obtaining a correct answer, your time commitment to that problem, ancillary considerations like stress and focus management, and how this problem fits into your larger strategy for the section and the exam. Ultimately, you must decide how much time it is worth expending on each problem as part of your core process.

This mental cost benefit analysis must be deeply embedded in your thought process to achieve an elite EA score. With the proper calibration, this sense will certainly be useful in business school and beyond. In the professional world, there will always be time constraints – be it stringent deadlines or time zone differences. Being able to prioritize focus and make decisions quickly and accurately while navigating uncertainty and incomplete information is a huge strength. Similarly, actively choosing to abandon a low value or less important task so that you can fully devote to solving an issue of importance is not a sign of weakness or incapability, but rather an asset in a world that will always ask more of you than you can give. Time is scarce in the workplace, and just like on the Executive Assessment, you should prioritize what adds the most value to your bottom line. 

Every problem has multiple solution paths

 A common theme in our client’s feedback is their fascination with a core principle that we teach; that every EA problem has multiple solution paths and that sensitivity to how you solve the problem is more important than simply arriving at the correct answer. Let’s take a means and averages problem from the Quant section as an example. Many would be tempted to solve this mathematically straightaway, but this problem can be solved more efficiently using a scenario or a graph rather than processing equations, delivering greater clarity and freeing up valuable time for other, more challenging problems.

Wresting yourself away from the paradigm that a problem has a single “correct” solution path is essential to conquering the Executive Assessment but is also valuable in life. Very few things are clear cut and unambiguous, and training yourself to recognize multiple ways to get to the same destination is important, especially if you can recognize them before committing to any specific path. Seeking answers beyond the ordinary and obvious will provide you with innovative ways of overcoming obstacles and drive progress, and make you a thought leader among your peers and in your graduate program and organization.

Focusing on the structure of the EA helps you compare solution paths and choose the best for the current challenge, resulting in not only a correct answer, but a timely one. Moreover, thinking of a problem from multiple perspectives means that you take into consideration unlikely or unnoticed features of a problem, and when applied to a business setting, this added vision can drive great insight into stakeholders interests and uncover innovative solutions to intractable problems.

In order to succeed first know yourself

The Executive Assessment is not an exam where you can get 100% of the problems correct. In fact, your score will not depend on the number of questions that you get correct, but rather by the difficulty level of the ones that you do get correct. Since the EA is computer adaptive, it increases in difficulty until it matches a candidate’s capabilities, and the aim as a test taker is to get to the most difficult problems that you can handle, and then get most of those correct. In this way, the Executive Assessment drives you to perform at your best rather than spending a lot of time testing fundamentals.

Ultimately, this means that you must decide how to allocate your time and energy to produce the best performance. This means understanding your strengths and weaknesses, evaluating each problem in light of those, and then deciding which problems make sense to handle, which make sense to invest extra time in, and which (few) problems you might want to walk away from right off the bat in order to preserve your valuable time for higher value problems. Don’t simply put your head down and try to get everything right – at least not at first.

During your EA preparation you should be conscious of how you perform and how you have progressed from where you began. If you struggle to finish a practice exam in a timely manner, this is a sign that your time management skills require polishing, and that you’re not making timing decisions well. If you perform well on Sentence Correction but not on the Reading Comprehension, then that means that you can spend less time on SC questions and reallocate that time towards Reading Comp, thereby increasing your score and building confidence in your Executive Assessment allocation decisions along the way.

Understanding your strengths and weaknesses, and the workload you handle best will help you excel in your career. Furthermore, knowing your capabilities can aid you when setting work boundaries and defining your professional skill set on the other side of business school. Successful professionals know how to focus on what they do best, and remove those tasks that impinge upon their productivity and value.

In this way, they don’t find themselves taking on too much, and are able to have work life balance, all while placing them in a position to continue to achieve because of that balance. Overworking is counterproductive because it drives burnout and reduces focus and efficiency. In much the same way that athletes require proper rest for peak performance, those working in intellectually rigorous fields requiring creativity need mental breaks for better focus, clarity and job performance. In this sense, being aware of your own limitations will guide you towards a healthy work-life balance and in turn increase productivity. 

5% talent and 95% hard work

Being naturally intuitive with numbers or extremely well-read can provide a great footing for your EA preparation. Without further development, however, natural talent can only take you so far. The Executive Assessment begins testing you the moment you can no longer trust your intuition and talent, and then need to rely upon knowing what you don’t know, and navigating towards deeper insights. The EA tests a range of skills such as critical assessment of data, ability to reason and analytical thinking. This means that being knowledgeable and skillful with fundamentals, or being a strong student only lays the foundation for success. It’s persistence, determination, and having a comprehensive study plan and clear understanding of this exam’s architecture that defines those who score 165 or better.

The good news is that the skills necessary to get a 165+ EA score can be cultivated and enhanced with hard work, perseverance and determination. Moreover, these same skills can help you get the most out of your EMBA program and career and enhance your skill set. For example, in business school you may come across an exceptional mathematician pursuing a concentration in Marketing because she has identified a weak point, and wants to focus on how to conduct research, to write and communicate clearly and effectively and to understand and implement data in the decision making process. Similarly, someone with average mathematical Mathematical ability might excel in Finance courses because of the skills he has developed – analytical thinking, problem solving, and constructing mental models.

Conclusion

The most important thing is to put in the hard work (effortful learning, not just a lot of prep time) to grow those top-level skills, regardless of how naturally gifted you are in a given subject. Marketing isn’t all creativity nor is finance all math, and in this way professional challenges are similar to the Executive Assessment itself, which is neither about Math nor English grammar. Compensating your weaknesses and enhancing your strengths in your chosen concentration will be a vital part of your EMBA experience, and it should start with your EA preparation.

Your Executive Assessment journey can be pleasant and enriching rather than an arduous, distasteful experience that you dread having to go through. With the proper mindset, guidance and support you can grow through your EA experience to acquire valuable skills that will help you for years to come.

Schedule a call with one of our experienced Executive Assessment consultants at +41 41 534 98 78, +44 (0) 79 4361 2406 or +1 (917) 819-5945  and get a head start on the road to achieving your goal.

If you enjoyed this EA journey article, learn more about the EA exam in this overview.

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executive assessment prep for success
Posted on
03
Dec 2020

Can Executive Assessment Tutoring Help You Succeed

By: Apex GMAT
Contributor: Altea Sulollari
Date: 3rd December 2020

As a seasoned professional hoping to gain admission to a respected Executive MBA program, you’ll probably opt to sit for the Executive Assessment exam. The EA is a new exam that tests the skills business professionals have acquired over the course of a career. As such, it’s shorter than the GMAT and contains fewer questions.

Nevertheless, the EA exam has the power to determine your future. It’s important to focus on proper preparation if you want to get into a top EMBA program. Executive Assessment tutoring can help. This article explains the benefits of EA tutoring and helps you decide if  private tutoring is right for you.

The Executive Assessment: Overview

The Executive Assessment exam is similar in content to the GMAT. However, there are a few notable differences.

To begin with, the EA includes 3 main sections: Quantitative Reasoning (14 questions), Verbal (14 questions), and Integrated Reasoning (12 questions). Unlike the GMAT, the EA does not include an Analytical Writing Assessment. 

  • The EA quantitative section is easier than the quantitative section on the GMAT. For one, the EA doesn’t contain as many geometry problems in the Integrated Reasoning section. 
  • The EA is also shorter in duration than the GMAT. It includes a total of 40 questions, with a 90-minute time limit. 

It’s good to keep in mind that the EA exam is section-adaptive, meaning that the difficulty level changes after test-takers complete specific groups of questions. The GMAT, on the other hand, is item-adaptive. The difficulty level changes after every question, making the test more difficult. 

How Can EA Tutoring Help You Succeed?

Let’s discuss the 3 main reasons to consider EA tutoring:

Find the study methods that work for you

An adept instructor will teach you the best strategies to get the score you’re aiming for. Years of experience, both with students and in the field, provides elite instructors with the expertise necessary to customize a preparation approach that maximizes your natural strengths and meets your needs.

Get the most out of your time

Above all, hiring a private tutor can save you time. Your tutor will keep you focused on mastering what’s most important. They’ll tackle your weaknesses head-on with personalized strategies, rather than relying on a “one-size-fits-all” approach to learning. With the help of a high quality private tutor, you can make significant progress without wasting significant time.

A private tutor can help you land a spot in a top EMBA program

An excellent Executive Assessment performance can score you a spot in any of the top EMBA programs out there, opening countless doors along the way. The right instructor will get you there with training that sets you up to achieve your personal best, assuring that your time and effort pay off. Top EA tutors know what these programs are looking for when it comes to scores, skills, and qualifications. Use their expertise to polish your application and resume!

Here are some things to consider if you’re thinking about hiring a quality Executive Assessment instructor: EA Team

Still deciding? Schedule a free consultation with one of Apex EA instructors to discuss your options and career goals today. 

Visit our Executive Assessment tutoring page for more information.

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